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  1. KhorneliusPraxx is offline
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    Baracknophobic

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    Posted On:
    12/21/2006 10:19am

    supporting member
     Style: JackOAllTradesMasterONone

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mungkorn Dam
    I was constantly berated for having my elbow too low when hooking. As Alex said, it should be parallel with the ground. Gumby have you tried hooking with your hand turned 90 degrees?


    Like this:



    I've got seriously fucked wrists and can only hook like this. If I try it the other way I get pain shooting through my wrist and arm on impact.
    I was just going to ask the same thing...
    are you throwing these with a horizontal fist or a verticle fist?

    If you have been doing this with a horizontal fist...try the other as shown in the picture.
    Real Join Date: Nov. 2003

    Quote Originally Posted by Dilbert
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  2. MadeOfOlives is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/21/2006 10:28am


     Style: BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    [QUOTE=Alex]when you throw the hook make sure to get your whole body moving into it. when you are shadowboxing try really exaggerating the movement- your right foot should be up on the ball of the foot and by the end of the punch should be pointing to you right side, almost pointing behind you in fact. QUOTE]

    Is that when throwing a right hook, or left?

    I ask because I have heard of visualizing the power for a LEFT hook as coming from the RIGHT foot, as a means of getting your whole body into the punch. This is in conjunction with the pivot on the left foot.

    Turning the right foot all the way around, however, would probably lead to falling down.
  3. KhorneliusPraxx is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/21/2006 10:40am

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     Style: JackOAllTradesMasterONone

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I assume he is right-handed...and will therefore practice and fight right-handed...thus his lead hook will be with his left hand. He is new and I doubt he is working on rear hooks.

    In Muay Thai, you practice how you fight. I practice both leads equally in Jun Fan but I was told that if went to a Master Chai seminar that he would be upset if I switched leads.
    Real Join Date: Nov. 2003

    Quote Originally Posted by Dilbert
    "Driving without blood is surprisingly difficult."
  4. NoMan is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/27/2006 3:26am


     Style: Boxing, Judo, BJJ, M.T.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Keeping the elbow up during the hook is designed to prevent counterpunching. The hook is already an easy punch to counter against, and if your elbow is low, the chin is exposed. Any punch you throw, the chin should be tucked behind the shoulder to make it harder to counterpunch.

    For the vertical vs. horizontal hook, I haven't felt much difference between the two, and think it's largely a matter of preference. Some boxing experts will tell you that a vertical fist is more effective for hitting a target further away, while a horizontal fist is for nearer targets. I've heard some coaches reverse that, and from my experience, it's a personal preference and doesn't actually make any difference.

    taking a small step angled to the outside, which helps you get coiled up for the strike.

    Telegraph. I would not do this. you shouldn't step at all.
    I often do. I step left and forward whenever I throw the jab, pull the rear foot up on the cross, and then torque on the lead when hooking. I wouldn't recommend stepping right before throwing the hook though, that would be a telegraph.

    The harder part is that you have to walk into the guy's cross, (assuming you both fight with the same foot forward), and need to initiate head movement to avoid the punch. If you step to the left, you load up your left leg with your body weight. The whole point of the pivot is to transfer the bodyweight through the leg and into the opponent. If you 'load' up the leg first, you'll get more power when you do the transfer. This happens anyway after you throw a cross, hence the 1-2-3 combo.

    People sometimes get in the habit of whipping their arm out then tightening it fast because it feels good and powerful, even though it isn't.
    You can spot it by listening to the bag. (Depending on how loud where you train at is.) When people do that, they often like to hear the crisp smacking sound it makes on the bag, making them think they're hitting it harder. If you straighten your arm out while throwing the hook, then flex your bicep in on impact, it'll make a "pop" sound when you hit it. Sounds viscious, but doesn't help.
  5. mrsumo is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/29/2006 2:13am


     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Positioning of the elbow is just as situational as whether your wrist is horizontal or vertical. Distance and scenerio dictate how best to apply the hook. At starting or interview distance the hook can be a great opener, like a lead left hook/right cross combo. Here is where a higher elbow will be more effective. In-fighting or in a clinch the hook becomes more opportunistic. You are looking for what ever opening you can find and the limited range tends to limit your ability to use straight punches. This range is the home of the hook and uppercut. If you limit yourself to throwing the same hook with the same trajectory every time you are cheating yourself. The beauty of the hook is that it can come from anywhere.

    I am no stranger to joint pain and stiffness. The answer here is work through it. I was diagnosed with arthritis at 19. I have had great luck with glucosamine. But unfortunately only conditioning will work out that pain you are feeling. Keep at the heavy bag and strike from different ranges and angles.
  6. Moon Dragon is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/29/2006 1:47pm


     Style: Krav Maga & MACS

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't know much about MT, but I do know something about sports medicine. Is it only when you hook with your left or is it all left handed punches?
  7. Judah Maccabee is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/29/2006 6:37pm

    supporting memberhall of fameBullshido Newbie
     Style: Krav / (Kick)Boxing / BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Regarding a "telegraph" by an outward step for the lead hook, if you slip a cross with a step to the outside, that's a perfect opportunity as it's part of the motion. It's contextual. Obviously, if you step outside right off the bat, they'll watch for it.
  8. Fighting Cephalopod is offline
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    Submitting 1d6 Investigators per round

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    Posted On:
    12/30/2006 2:05am

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     Style: ZHOO ZHITSU

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Judah Maccabee
    Regarding a "telegraph" by an outward step for the lead hook, if you slip a cross with a step to the outside, that's a perfect opportunity as it's part of the motion. It's contextual. Obviously, if you step outside right off the bat, they'll watch for it.
    This is entirely true, but "Only throw hooks after you slip a cross" is not a great combat tactic, so if a step to the outside telegraphs when you're not slipping, you need to figure out how to throw a proper hook without doing so.
    Undisputed KING OF ASSHOLES.
  9. Ecks is offline

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    Posted On:
    1/01/2007 12:02pm


     Style: Boxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Gumby

    My understanding of the hook is that your hand doesnt extend past your elbow, but now where should your shoulder feel when you're throwing it? (i.e. is your hand trailing your shoulder, in line with, or ahead of it) It never feels like I can generate a whole lot of power when Im throwing a hook, certainly not to the extent of my cross.
    Forearm should be about nose or chin level, so you look over your forearm at your opponent. If you're not generating power, make sure you're foot is torqued fully, but don't overextend your fist. It should never go past your opposite shoulder.

    I've always had a better hook than my cross, personally. You should be able to generate almost equal, if not more power, in your hook than your cross.
  10. JohnnyCache is offline
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    All Out of Bubblegum

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    Posted On:
    1/01/2007 10:04pm

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     Style: MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I find using a corkscrew hook keeps my wrist pain down, my impacts heavy, and insures I hit with the right part of the fist.
    There's no choice but to confront you, to engage you, to erase you. I've gone to great lengths to expand my threshold of pain. I will use my mistakes against you. There's no other choice.
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