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  1. rw4th is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/26/2006 2:07am


     Style: BJJ,MT,RBSD (on hiatus)

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Stop breaking into people's yards to peek through the windows.

    Voila, problem avoided.
    Last edited by rw4th; 11/26/2006 2:11am at .
  2. velomaster is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/26/2006 4:48pm


     Style: bjj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by rw4th
    Stop breaking into people's yards to peek through the windows.

    Voila, problem avoided.
    As if was that simple. A lot of dog owners unleash their dogs in public places or they don't tie them up when they are at home also in many cases the dogs turn against their owners or their owner's family particularly children. Plus usually antysocial types tend to own large dogs with the sole purpose of intimidation. If you like the outdoors, cycling, rollerblading or jogging stray dogs are an ever increasing threat.
  3. Cassius is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/26/2006 5:05pm

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    An example of the aforementioned vicious canines:

    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  4. Ajamil is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/26/2006 6:29pm


     Style: Judo newb

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I still have the scar on my neck and puncture wound on my hand from a schizo dog that a friend of mine owned. I was petting the animal as it suddenly decided I was a threat, so it lunged up for my throat. I basically decided to sacrifice my hand/arm into it's jaws, then threw my entire weight upon it's neck. This was a mid-size dog - probably less than 120 lbs., so that definately helped me. If my friend hadn't pulled it away I was intent upon staying there until it suffocated. But enough bravado. That's what I would recommend, but there's serious complications when the dog is charging you and if the dog is any sort of heavyweight like the 200+ rottweiler's I've seen behind fences.

    My advice depends on the situation. If the dog is trying to threaten you, just calmly back away. If they're slowly advancing, scream your lungs out and throw things at them. If they're charging, run and climb something. If all of that fails, find a good weapon.
  5. chaosexmachina is offline
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    Unexpected Elbow

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    Posted On:
    11/26/2006 9:48pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: MMA/Pankration

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Motor
    To protect yourself from a dog attack
    1. Don't stare at them in the eyes. Its considered a threat.
    No wonder that dog gets so pissed when I stare him down. :confused2
    "The depressing thing about tennis is that no matter how good I get, I'll never be as good as a wall." - Mitch Hedberg

    El Guapo says dance!
  6. saturnjunkie is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/27/2006 5:27pm


     Style: FMA & judo-ultra noob

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Humorous answer: Crane kick. Done correctly, there is no defense.

    One thing I heard, which I cannot substantiate is that if you pull down extremely hard on their jaw you will break it. The unfortunate thing is that you are effectively condemning the dog to a slow death as the jaw usually cannot be fixed. Given the amount of muscle in a dog's mandible I'd say this is highly unlikely. Anyone else ever heard this before?

    Side note: My girlfriend's got some pretty bad scars on her collarbone from where she got mauled by a german shep as a kid; A few inches more to the right and she'd have died. I love dogs, but hate their owners, you know?
  7. saturnjunkie is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/27/2006 5:29pm


     Style: FMA & judo-ultra noob

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    One more thing - silliest defense ever I've seen that apparently worked (they demoed it on tv once) was to put up a newspaper between you and the dog. Apparently the dog can't figure out it's just freaking paper and will bark/snarl/etc but as long as you keep it between you it might as well be a brick wall.
  8. money is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/27/2006 5:45pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ, MT, MMA, CQB

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnjunkie
    One more thing - silliest defense ever I've seen that apparently worked (they demoed it on tv once) was to put up a newspaper between you and the dog. Apparently the dog can't figure out it's just freaking paper and will bark/snarl/etc but as long as you keep it between you it might as well be a brick wall.
    Okay, I'd like to see a link of that, lol.
  9. velomaster is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/27/2006 11:30pm


     Style: bjj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There are approximately 4.5 million reported dog bites annually in the United States (nearly 2% of the American population). The majority of dog bites are never reported to local authorities.

    40% of American dog owners acquired pets primarily for protection-including German shepherds, Rottweilers, mastiffs and Doberman pinschers. (Source: New York Times, 2/26/01)

    Nationwide, U.S. Postal Service carriers suffered 3,423 dog attacks and bites in 2003.


    According to the American Medical Association, dog bites are the second leading cause of childhood injury, surpassing playground accidents.

    Dog bites to people of the male gender are approximately two times greater than the incidence involving females.


    Dogs that are licensed with an identifiable owner are implicated in the vast majority of dog bites (compared with strays).


    Dogs not known to the victim account for approximately 10 - 20% of all reported dog bites.


    Dog between one and five years are involved in more dog bite incidences than dogs older than 6 years. Male dogs are more frequently involved when compared with female dogs.

    Mixed breeds and not pure bred dogs are the type of dog most often involved in inflicting bites to people. The pure-bred dogs most often involved are German shepherds and Chow chows.



    The list of breeds most involved in both bite injuries and fatalities changes from year to year and from one area of the country to another, depending on the popularity of the breed.



    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention document that a chained dog is 2.8 times more likely to bite than an unchained dog. Click here for a news story about a mauling of a 4 year old child by a chained pit bull



    Canines not spayed or neutered are three times more likely to bite than sterilized ones.



    Of the estimated 4.7 million people who were bitten by dogs in 1994, 800,000 sought medical care. Of these, 332,000 needed treatment in emergency rooms, and 6,000 were hospitalized. The average hospital stay for a dog-bite injury was 3.6 days.


    Emergency room costs for dog bite victims in the United States was about $102 million in 1994, and overall direct medical costs was about $165 million.


    The majority of dog bites to adult humans are inflicted to the lower extremities followed by bites to the upper extremities including the head, face and neck. For children, 77% of dog bite injuries are to facial areas.

    According to the Insurance Information Institute, dog bites accounted for about one-quarter of all claims on homeowner's insurance, costing more than $321 million in 2003. In 2002, the latest year for which numbers are available, the average claim for a dog bite was $16,600.

    Dog attacks account for one-third of all liability claims on homeowners' insurance policies. According to the Western Insurance Information Service, the insurance industry paid out more than $1 billion in dog-bite claims in 1998 alone.



    From 1979 to 1996, dog attacks resulted in more than 300 human dog bite related deaths in the United States. Most of the victims were children.



    Approximately 20 people die every year as a result of a dog attack in the United States. By far, the majority of the victims are children.



    In the two year period from 1997 to 1998, twenty-seven people died as a result of dog bite attacks (18 in 1997, and 9 in 1998).



    Annually in the United States there are approximately 20 human fatalities directly resulting from a dog attack; this number is miniscule compared with human fatalities caused by gunshot (approximately 12,000 annually), accidents (approximately 100,000 annually) or health related disease processes (click here for table) (Click here for commentary on this subject)


    The breeds most often involved in fatal attacks are Rottweilers and Pit bulls.



    In the United States, pit bulls make up one to three per cent of the overall dog population and cause more than 50 per cent of serious attacks.


    Of the 27 people who died as a result of dog bite attacks in 1997 and 1998, 67% involved unrestrained dogs on the owner's property; 19% involved unrestrained dogs off the owner's property; 11% involved restrained dogs on the owner's property; and 4% involved a restrained dog off the owner's property.


    Of the 27 people who died as a result of dog bite attacks during 1997 and 1998, 67% involved an attack by one dog; 19% involved an attack by two dogs; and 15% involved an attack by 3 or more dogs.


    From 1979 to 1998, at least 25 breeds of dogs have been involved in bite related deaths. Pit Bulls and Rottweilers were involved in more than 50 percent of these incidences.



    In a study reported by a retired professor from California State University at Chino, Robert Plum, it was found that one dog in 55 will bite someone seriously during the course of a year. With respect to breed differences in the tendency to inflict serious injury, Plumb estimates that when a pit bull bites a human, one in 16 (e.g. 1/16) will inflict serious injury; this contrasts with a ratio of 1/296 Dobermans, and 1/156 German shepherds.



    Dog Bite Statistics from: Texas, 1997, 1998; Australia (pdf file);

    The Netherlands (pdf file), New Zealand, State of Nevada (USA) (pdf file)





    Return to home page of Dr. Polsky


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------
  10. Permalost is offline
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    pro nonsense self defense

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    Posted On:
    11/28/2006 2:37am

    supporting member
     Style: FMA, dumbek, Indian clubs

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnjunkie
    Humorous answer: Crane kick. Done correctly, there is no defense.

    One thing I heard, which I cannot substantiate is that if you pull down extremely hard on their jaw you will break it. The unfortunate thing is that you are effectively condemning the dog to a slow death as the jaw usually cannot be fixed. Given the amount of muscle in a dog's mandible I'd say this is highly unlikely. Anyone else ever heard this before?

    Side note: My girlfriend's got some pretty bad scars on her collarbone from where she got mauled by a german shep as a kid; A few inches more to the right and she'd have died. I love dogs, but hate their owners, you know?

    I really doubt the jaw thing. In my previous post, I mentioned that my dad tried to pry the jaws of a big dog apart because it was biting his dog's neck. It didn't work, and he cut up his hands pretty good and lost some feeling in his thumb. He also gave it some running soccer kicks, and he's a big dude (over 200lbs) and wears work boots all the time. I get the idea, but what works on paper doesn't always work in reality (basically the premise of this site)
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