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  1. tukong is offline

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    Nov 2006
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    Posted On:
    11/17/2006 1:29am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Tukong Moosul:History Part 1

    I see so much negative posting on this site. Everyone seems to know so much more than the other guy and has to insult the guy, his master, his style, his school, his knowledge, his ability, his honesty or something. To be fair, there are a few members who are very polite in skepticism or even, RARELY, praise. But I find, generally, so many guys here, have to PROVE they are better or know more or have the 'real answer' or have a better background, etc... ad nauseum, by ripping on the other guy.

    Okay, so I present myself as a target to the impolite and rude. I am here to present facts and dates and names that can be verified by most willing to do their due diligence on the complete and sordid history of the style called TUKONG MOOSUL.

    I am Jimmy Higgins. I was there. Ask me to answer any question, but could we please be a little courteous to each other? Is it possible to have a serious discussion to find the truth, without dropping into insults and stating opinions as facts without merit? I hope so.

    So here goes nothing. I will take you through, why I went to the first school, my introduction to the style, my relationship with the Master Won Ik Yi and my white belt training/testing so that you can understand my viewpoint and experiences. Then you will understand why I know the history and beginning so well of TUKONG MOOSUL. Then I will go through what I did and what I found out about the historical Korean roots of TUKONG MOOSUL and it's American History. I ask that the moderators give me some slack here since I want to be as accurate as possible and I do get wordy in my recollections.

    My first contact with martial arts was in 1982 with a local TKD school. I trained for 3 days and the instructor told me I learned fast and that I could test that week for my Yellow belt. I did my form, my kicks, answered questions on school address and history of TKD, broke my board and was passed to Yellow belt. One week later, I had a severe and embarrassing accident, that shattered my wrist in 9 places, hyper extended my elbow, dislocated my shoulder and bruising my pelvic bone, all on my left side.

    I could not walk, the bone surgeon wanted to fuse my wrist bones since he said they would never heal and I would have serious pain if I tried to have them heal without fusing them. I was given two operations to place several pins and clips in my wrist and left index knuckle to reset the bones and hold them in place since I declined the fusion idea and accepted I would have pain for the rest of my life and a weak left wrist and hand. I had a full arm cast that I held above my head all the time and propped up with a foam cutout as I slept.

    My wrist bones healed quickly as I was 22 at the time and in good health. I had another operation to remove all the pins and clips a couple months later and was told to go into physical therapy in a couple weeks.

    My elbow had shortened tendons that did not allow any movement outside of the angle my cast had set my arm into for 3 months. I shoulder was weak and atrophied as was my left chest, bicep, forearm, and hand muscles. I never went to physical therapy after the first visit, that was way to easy. I started using small weights and tried to make my elbow bend through holding a weight that pulled it down. I joined a Gym and read everything I could on rehabilitation, muscle development, weight training, nutrition for growth, and I was Biology major at the University of Texas at Austin.

    My friend from high school, Paul Gmitter, said I should come to his martial arts school that was near my house and talk with the Master there that did Acupuncture on his students and see if he could help me. I said I would later.

    After a month of self-rehab, the bone surgeon x-rayed me and said everything was looking very good and my recovery was faster than almost anyone he had operated on. I asked who had a better recovery rate than me and he told me about one patient that was a very promising athlete at UT before he was in a car accident and broke way to many bones. I later contacted that guy through the surgeon's office to ask how he had rehabbed to see if I could use some of his experience to help me. The surgeon said that my wrist and elbow were healing far better than he thought they would and my range of motion would probably get a little better in my wrist but not much. He was wrong. My wrist has 95% range of motion of my right one.


    I decided TKD was not what I wanted, so I visited the martial arts school of my friend to see if the Master there would work on my wrist and elbow with anything that might help. That day I went to a school called "Master Yi's Shaolin Martial Arts" that had a big Yellow and Black sign with a Ninja on it in shadow under the name.

    I watched the noon class and talked with the Master, Won Ik Yi about what I thought was the most awesome class I had ever seen. He was about 26 and in his prime. His Kung Fu skills were pretty and powerful and FAST! He knew all the traditional weapons with incredible ability and balance. He was like a real life Ninja Hollywood Super Hero. I swear his kicking and forms and weapons abilities were incredible and amazing that to this day I have not seen any other martial artist in real life or on screen with his abilities in speed, power and balance. His techniques were flawless and his presence was magnetic. The only person I have met that is better at actual fighting and not sparring is In Ki Kim. I am sure there are many others, but I have not met them or seen them.

    I joined the school in April of 1982. There were 65 students enrolled in the small school without air-conditioning in a warehouse complex in Austin, Texas. He had only recently rented the sapce after he had been teaching at UT as an intermural class for $25/month for UT students. He charged me $40 a month for training when I signed up in the Master Yi's Shaolin Martial Arts school. You can check any 1982 phone book in Austin and see the name and address and phone number. It is there and verifiable.

    There was no mention of Tuek Gong (Korean spelling). The only brochure at the school had a picture of Won Ik Yi and a short run down of his history and skills and what he taught in the school. It was in a very strange and hard to read font and copied onto pastel green paper that looked bad, instead of being printed on good paper. Money was an issue. But the school was better than anything I had ever seen and there was a sort of CULT mentality because of his very affable nature and great personality that was very genuine and magnetic. He was a young man with awesome skill and knowledge.

    I became his Philosophy student after the first week after he interviewed me. He asked why I wanted to join his school? I said to find questions. He looked at me sideways and corrected me, "you mean to find answers?" "No, sir. To find questions. I can find the answers myself, if I can ask the right questions." (I was raised in Texas to say Yes/No Sir/Ma’am to anyone older than me. It was not a suck up or a martial arts discipline thing.) He smiled and said that I was to be his first Philosophy student. And so it went.

    I came to every class and trained at the noon class and my evening class. I scheduled all my UT classes for the Morning except one Tuesday/Thursday Chemistry Lab class so that I could train and stay at the school and train between the break of noon class and evening classes. Usually, there was always someone there duirng those hours that would allow a white belt the chance to stay and practice. If I was not a high enough belt rank to attend classes, I watched those upper belt classes as I studied and did assignments for Biology degree. After classes were over, I would run the 3 miles home to my house every day 6 days a week with my backpack of books and notebooks.

    I never signed up for promotion test since I thought I sucked too much to test and I did not want to be like the TKD school where I promoted after one week. I saw many students pass me up as I stayed a white belt and practiced for hours my basic punches, stances, forms, kicks and weapons. Sometimes, I would have philosophy classes with Won Ik Yi when he would get lunch and eat at the school. I could ask him anything about anything and he could answer almost everything I asked. He would tell me stories to teach philosophy lessons and ask me Zen stuff like what is the purpose of a tree? I would give him the scientific explanation of the eco-system and he would just laugh and tell me about energy and Ki.


    Finally, he wanted to know why I never tested? He saw me train for hours on simple things and told me I was the first and ONLY person who had ever do 1,000 kicks in a day of any of his students. I said that I had watched his upper belts and saw that they did not have the exactly correct stances or form or technique and I did not want to be like them, so I was happy to just practice punches, blocks and stances until I could do them correctly. He said I would never be prefect in anything and I should test since he was the Master and it was up to him. He then made a new rule that every student must ask permission to be tested no matter who you were. He would tell each student if they were ready or not to test.

    That is how I started to know Won Ik Yi in Master Yi's Shaolin Martial Arts school. I tried to be the best student there and practiced 6 - 8 hours every day for a year. If not practicing the exact lessons I was taught, I would train on my physical conditioning and rehabbing my atrophied left side and my range of motion for my elbow and wrist. My bone surgeon was surprised to see the progress after 3 months when I almost had fully covered my full range of motion and balanced my muscular development. I never went back again to him.

    My first test, was a "make up" test for those students who had missed the actual test for whatever reason. There were 9 of us testing and 3 of us were White belts, testing for Yellow. One of our requirements was to roll in a martial arts style (NOT a gymnastics style). I had been in gymnastics for a couple years and had trouble changing how I rolled. So I practiced rolling out in the parking lot between cars. If I did not roll straight, I hit a car and it hurt. There was no padding on the hot Texas asphalt so it hurt every time anyway. I learned to roll straight, correctly and not hit my hip or shoulder when I did it.

    When it came time to test rolling, Won ik Yi ordered us all outside onto the hot asphalt on that sunny Saturday Texas morning. Being barefoot was painful on the loose gravel and sloping lot.

    The white belts lined up, as did the other belts and I was the first in line. Won Ik Yi told me to roll 5 times down the sloping parking lot from a standing start. Usually only Yellow belts and above started rolls and dive rolls from standing and always inside the school on the mats. Oh well, this was a test, so I did it. After 5 rolls down the slope over losse gravel and small pieces of glass you find in a warehouse complex parking lot, I stood up, went to attention and KIAPed ready.

    Won IkYi then told me to turn around and roll back 5 times up the sloping parking lot. That was harder, but I did it and saw the faces of the other testers as I did. They were freaking out thinking they had to do this too. Once I finished. stood and KIAPed Ready,
    Won IkYi told everyone to go back inside and he finished testing us inside the school on the mats or the unpadded carpet over concrete.

    Almost everyone passed, but the next week, everyone talked about how I was tested on my rolls. The upper belts from blue up started practicing their rolls and dive rolls outside on the asphalt. Many hurt themsleves trying to roll between cars and on asphalt for the first time. That was the first time people did not like me, when I did nothing to deserve their bad feelings except train as hard as I could to be the best I could. I tell you this as part of the history, because this and several more accasions like it actually causes the American
    TUKONG group to split into two groups later.

    End of Part ONE.
    Last edited by tukong; 11/17/2006 2:18am at .
  2. tukong is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/17/2006 2:27am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Tukong Moosul:History Part 2

    This next Part 2 is copied from a letter I wrote to an attorny that was hired by Won Ik Yi to threaten me for using the word, TUKONG. There is some overlap, but I took out as much overlap as I thought was good without making the history unclear.
    =====================================

    In 1982, I joined a school called, “Master Yi’s, Shaolin Martial Arts.” In this school, there was a program called “Inja” training. The curriculum was Chinese Kung Fu based, i.e. the Chinese Shaolin reference. However, the marketing reflected pictures of Ninja, which is of Japanese origin. So it was a mix of the David Carredine, “Kung Fu” Shaolin temple monk series with the invincible and invisible Ninja assassin theme. There was no mention of Special Forces or Won Ik Yi’s military service in the Headquarters unit, which was NOT the “Special Combat” unit. (Check military hierarchy design of the South Korean military in the late 1970s for more information).

    I did not speak Korean and Won Ik Yi did not speak English very well. Paul Gmitter was my friend from Lanier high school who brought me to the school after I had been in Tae Kwon Do for a short time. I liked the school and I joined. Later, Won Ik Yi was desperate for money and offered me a Black Belt program only for $600 for lifetime membership. I of course paid in a heartbeat, but I knew that was a VERY bad business practice that did not created a budgeted cash flow for the school. That was the first indication that not only did Won Ik Yi not know English or Americans very well, he was not much of a business man either at the time.

    There were about 60-70 active students paying an average of $25 - $35 per month IF they paid at all. Won Ik Yi had trouble with the IRS and his cash flow. He later said that he worked at night cleaning buildings and stocking shelves at the local grocery store to pay the lease and utilities of the school since it was not profitable.

    I trained very hard and became a green belt student by 1983. By that time, I had beaten all upper belts in sparring except Jay Davisand Greg Steiner and who did not spar me. I also had been the only philosophy student with Won Ik Yi and become ingratiated to the Yi family and Won Ik Yi’s former girlfriend Lynn.

    One day after noon class, while I was a green belt, Won Ik Yi came to me and told me that he was going to close the school at the end of the month. He told me the IRS problems (my mother worked for the IRS at the time) and the problems of very few students paying tuition. He said he could not keep working so many hours and pay for the school’s bills anymore. So at the end of the month he would not pay the landlord and simply close the school.

    I understood his business problems. I had wondered how the school was financially ever since I took the $600 Black Belt deal (which he never completed). He had no systems in place for tracking attendance, or tuition payments other than an old Lotus 123 spreadsheet that was not up to date or accurate. His advertising consisted of a big sign with a NINJA archer with the words Shaolin Martial Arts in black letters on a yellow background and not much else. His informational and pricing materials were printed on an old dot matrix printer in a strange, hard to read font and there was NO mention of his military background, which I had learned of by then.

    An Ex-Marine, Craig Patterson, a much older student than myself, was a blue belt and who I talked with about the school problems. Craig told me that if he could help in anyway, to let him know. That gave me an idea.

    I talked with Won Ik Yi again and made a deal with him. He would give me one week to turn things around before the end of the month. I told him to turn the school over to me for one week with Craig Patterson as his spokesman to tell everyone I was in charge and in control of the school. He was skeptical at first. I told Won Ik Yii to leave and come back in one week and I would change everything so that the school could survive and be financially successful. Maybe he did not trust that I could do this, but he had nothing to lose, so he agreed.

    Won Ik Yi did not understand Americans and did not know how to market the school or how American business practices worked including taxes with the IRS. The IRS contended that he had signed up many students but kept no records and was hiding cash payments from them and they were ready to seize all assets and freeze the bank accounts.

    I gave him my word that I could take care of everything if he gave me control and carte blanche to do whatever I needed. Won Ik Yi agreed since he had nothing to lose. He talked with Craig Patterson and Craig agreed with my plan. Craig also agreed that Won Ik Yi must NOT be there while I did all the changes so that students could not come to him and confuse the issues and plan. Won Ik Yi agreed to this plan. He left for one week and gave me control of the “Master Yi’s, Shaolin Martial Arts” school. (Check old Austin phone book records of 1983, and you will see what the school was listed as BEFORE I was put in charge.)

    That week, Craig Patterson and I went to every class and Craig would tell everyone what was going on about closing the school and why I was now in charge. The older students and black belts did not like this since they had been there longer, but I had the skills and the trust of Won Ik Yi and he was gone, so they could not offer alternative of fight over getting control. He gave me control of the school and left. Since he was NOT there and I and Craig were, nobody could really object. Craig would then turn the class over to me, a green belt.

    In that week, I changed the school from Master Yi's Shaolin Martial Arts with Inja training to the Tukong Moosul school. TUKONG Moosul was my incorrect English pronunciation of a Korean phrase that I could not pronounce properly. ALL Koreans pronounce it and spell it, Teuk Gong (Moo Sool/Musul). Check the following websites for accuracy of how Koreans spell the same thing that I spelled wrong as one word, “TUKONG.”

    http://tkms.or.kr/

    Story of highest black belt in Korea..
    http://usataekwondocenter.tripod.com/id7.html

    Globally it is spelled how Koreans spell it even in France.
    http://www.hanmudo-france.org/index....Representation

    Even when not associated with the fighting style, the Koreans still spell the phrase different from my version. Look at the TGT means.
    http://hwarangdo.uchicago.edu/instructors.htm

    A Korean Guide to Korean Martial Arts.
    http://www.concentric.net/~sdseong/kmar.nls.htm

    See how Koreans spell “Special Force” in English
    http://www.hwarangdomn.com/default.php?p=SUQ0NQ==


    The Korean WORLD TEUK GONG FEDERATION in Seoul, South Korea. (Which has a BIG problem with Won Ik Yi using that term) also pronounces and writes the word as all Koreans do, on their websites and literature, Teuk Gong. The reason the spelling “T U K O N G” happened is simple.

    During the week that I was in charge of the “Master Yi's Shaolin Martial Arts” school, I changed all the brochures and marketing using my Texas pronunciation and spelling of the Korean phrase for “Special Combat” without the help of a KOREAN speaker and I spelled it the best I could and printed up new marketing, brochures, attendance sheets, contracts (more on those later), Calendars for birthdays, class schedules and anything else I could create to change the school from “Master Yi's Shaolin Martial Arts” and Inja to my spelling of the Korean phrase, “TUKONG.” Also, instead of making it two words as all Koreans do, Teuk Gong, I wrote it as one word, Tukong, since, to me, that is how it sounded. This was a very risky strategy on my part, but I figured, since the school was going to close anyway, there had to be a BIG difference on everything to turn it around.

    Won Ik Yii was fresh off the boat, so to speak, in 1982, when I joined his school and he could not speak English very well at all, over 23 years ago. He would NEVER have said TUKONG or written it the way a young Texan, me, who did not speak Korean, did as a single word written as, TUKONG. Won Ik Yi, like all other Koreans, did write the phrase “Special Combat” as two words, spelled in the English alphabet by Koreans, Teuk Gong. Check any Korean website that wants to say Special Force or Special Combat and you will see the truth of the matter.

    But, to me, that was too hard for Americans to figure out how to say if they read it. But Americans all new King Kong and I did not want to use a word like TO or TOO or TWO for the first sound. So I just wrote it so that most AMERICANS could sound it out close to the Korean phrase. I wrote it as, TUKONG.

    It was I, and I alone, that created the non-English word for the Korean phrase “Special Combat” as a single word, TUKONG, AFTER I had started training in “Master Yi’s, Shaolin Martial Arts” school. I have MANY witnesses that can prove this. So your statement about him using it before I ever started training is inaccurate at best and shows your ignorance of the situation since you were not there. Please get the facts before you start making statements as if they are true.

    I made the radical change from a Chinese-based reference to a Korean-based reference for very good reasons financially, tax wise and mostly from a marketing standpoint, since Won Ik Yi was Korean. Won Ik Yi did not understand or have the business skills to do this himself when he started to have trouble financially with the school in 1983. His business skills have improved with experience as has his English over 23 years, but at that time he was a novice at both.

    I also, created legal and binding contracts for all students. The school to that point had not had such a thing and used a signed receipt on a price list prior to my changes. I bluffed the current students into paying back fees to collect money for immediate cash by saying I knew who was behind and by how much, which was untrue since there were no accurate records or contracts before this week.

    I hit them with guilt and their honor code and put the schools financial trouble square on their shoulders. I spoke about Won Ik Yi’s commitment to them and how they had not been true or honorable in their commitment. I spoke about how we adults did not need a school to train, but the little 7 year old crippled kid who had a walker, Pete, that JAY DAVIS worked with, could not train in the parking lot.

    People were in tears after my speeches and ready to do whatever was needed to keep the school open. They all signed the contracts and I collected enough money from current students and raised the new school’s image and I raised tuition fees as well from $40/mo. to $65/mo. I was able to collect enough money in back dues and new down payments to pay off most of the bills and have money left over.

    I wanted to create a new image and distance it from the old Shaolin Kung Fu version of the school for several reasons. The first being, if the IRS shut the school called “Master Yi’s, Shaolin Martial Arts”, we could open under a new name I created, “Tukong.” Also, the marketing from Shaolin Martial Arts was ineffective and I wanted people to think it was a different school when they saw our advertising instead of having a preconceived idea of what Tukong was. I also wanted to tie the marketing to Korea since Won Ik Yi was Korean and NOT Chinese, but to do that and make the school unique I brought in the military connection even though the curriculum had nothing to do with the curriculum taught in the Special Combat units in South Korea. It was just marketing after all.

    At that time, did not know what the actual, real training program for the Special Forces in South Korea, but I did know it was not Kung Fu based. I called the Kung Fu we trained in, “Tukong” ONLY for marketing purposes. Ask any person who was in the Special Forces if they ever trained the curriculum taught in the Austin school and they would laugh at you like you were an idiot. This actually happened to one of Won Ik Yi’s Korean students from New Jersey who returned to South Korea and met Special Force soldiers.

    The curriculum in the Special Forces did not then and does not now have ANY of the forms taught in Austin. NONE of the promotion requirement forms or any weapons forms or weapons taught in the Austin school were ever taught in the Special Forces of South Korea except knife fighting. Even the knife fighting of the South Korean Special Forces is NOT what was or is taught in the Austin school. Simply, NONE the classes, techniques, weapons or philosophies, of the Austin school are actually what is taught in the South Korean Special Forces units. That is why Won Ik Yi called his school Shaolin Martial Arts originally.

    I created and used “Tukong” as a marketing gimmick ONLY, even though I knew it was all Kung Fu based training. But I only had a week to turn everything around, so I stretched the truth a lot. To say ANY of the forms or weapons other than knife which are taught by Won Ik Yi in Austin, are taught in the Special Forces either in the early 1980s or now, is a pure and verifiable lie. It is completely untrue.

    I have several former members of the South Korean Special Forces unit including Master Jae Sic Choi who will testify to that fact. Also, I and my Master In Ki Kim (who actually was an Instructor in the Special Force unit, unlike Won Ik Yi), went to Korea in 2002 and 2004 and met with the World Teuk Gong Moo Sool Federation Grand Master who taught at the Blue House. They also verified that there was nothing that Won Ik Yi teaches in Austin that is taught in the Special Force fighting program or in their official Teuk Gong school. Anyone who claims otherwise is a complete liar.

    Brian, as an attorney, you should have been taught in law school, when you get unconfirmed “facts” as word of mouth from one source, your whole argument falls apart when verifiable facts from many sources prove you wrong. Maybe your law school did not teach this basic idea. Have you ever bothered to personally confirm ANY of the “facts” Won Ik Yi has told you or that you read in the literature that I originally created to sell people to join the school? I wrote the original literature that is the foundation and basis for Tukong. Won Ik Yi did not speak English well, so I am the one that wrote everything and modeled it to sell people on the martial arts program I now called, TUKONG to join for $65/mo.(I know there have been price increases since 1983 wink). It sold you, but did you ever bother to verify any of the “facts” that make you go, ”WOW! I want to join!”?

    Anyway, back to the history lesson. During the week I took over the Master Yi's Shaolin Martial Arts school, I made arrangements for payment of all bills. I contacted the IRS and explained what was being done and how letting the school stay open would get them more money and why they were incorrect about Won Ik Yi trying to hide payments. I told them about our new attendance tracking system and the contracts. They agreed to back off.

    I created programs on my Macintosh for financials. After I did all of this, I turned the office management over to a kid named Kent, who I did not like since he would only worked for money while I was doing all this for no fee.

    When Won Ik Yi came back from his week away, Craig Patterson, Greg Steiner, and I explained everything I had done and why it was done. (Greg Steiner was then the second in command and is now a Chiropractor married to my ex-girlfriend who can testify to the validity of these statements). How much of this Won Ik Yi understood then, I do not know.

    But from that point forward I convinced Won Ik Yi into using my spelling of the phrase to create an organization like what the Korean Tae Kwon Do had. He had not done anything like this before I go there. He had not tried to organize or standardize the curriculum into anything except for that one location. I convinced him, for growth, it had to look professional and organized.

    He was so impressed with what I had done in a week and the extra money that he agreed. So, from that week forward, Won Ik Yi AND I, together, started to create the World Tukong Moosul Federation. He and I worked night and day on making a handbook, Patch, Belt rank philosophy, etc… on my Macintosh computer. I would ask him questions and make suggestions and he would give me his thoughts and information, which I would interpret and phrase for instruction, marketing sales and future growth. He did not have the skills or understanding how to do all this by himself. That is why it all started when I took control of the school for one week. Together we worked a couple months developing the initial concept and organization of the WTKMSF using our ideas and my business and marketing skills.

    I dropped out of school at the University of Texas, much to the consternation of my parents, to work on creating this new entity and image with new marketing and financials to make the school successful. Craig Patterson and Greg Steiner were witness to my efforts as were every other student in the school. The school started to grow rapidly using my newly created “TUKONG” image and marketing. Within 2 years, we went from closing the school to over 350 active students with almost 500 students on contract.

    The Famous Joon Rhea from Washington DC came to Austin to see what and who this juggernaut, TUKONG was? He held a seminar in the new schools's facility before it was even open. Won Ik Yi told Joon Rhea that I was the guy that made everything happen. Master Rhea took me on a drive that went from Austin to Waco and back, 6 hours, as he talked and asked me all about TUKONG and Won Ik Yi.

    I handed everything over to Won Ik Yi and the Black Belts and focused on training again. That is when things started to go wrong. The black belts and Won Ik Yi chose and signed a lease on a space without asking me first. They choose a very bad location without any sewage and spent WAY TOO much money on everything. We had no bathrooms or showers and the image of the marketing did not reflect the new locations problems. People joined but the growth slowed to a crawl. I watched it all start to head south as the black belts and Won Ik Yi tried to use their skills to build a business. It failed terribly. And within a short time, the new school was closed and the school moved back near it’s old location to a smaller facility.

    Won Ik Yi’s father quadruple promoted me at the first promotion ceremony of the new location. He later threatened to kill me a few months later as witnessed by Bobby Carter, his Bobby's Mother and John Stapleton over the fact that Won Ik Yi’s sister had fallen in love with me.

    After his father threatened to kill me, I left the school and within less than 1 year, so many students left the school after I left, that it had to close its location. This included Michelle Lepp who was good friends with Lynn, Won Ik Yi’s former girlfriend, who Michelle and I mistakenly helped moved out of Won Ik Yi’s apartment. Michelle was married to Lonnie Lepp of Firefist Martial Arts in Austin. She can also testify to the validity of these statements as can Lonnie.

    I was trained privately by Won Ik Yi during the time after I took over until I left the school. I was titled, Shaolin White Tiger Instructor in charge of the elite students called the White Tigers which replaced the old Inja class after so many people were disappointed that John Stapleton had been promoted to Black Belt when he could not even jump due to ankle problems.

    I discussed this trouble with Won Ik Yi and he told me to try and find a solution. My solution was to create an advanced class with higher standards, called the WHITE TIGERS. All the White Tiger students trained harder and longer than any other students. They double promoted and won many tournaments. They included my good friends Marcello Zamarripa, Buddy Sothstand, Eric Gomez, Troy Harber, Michael Young, Stu Fischbeck and others who all knew who actually changed the school from Master Yi's Shaolin Martial Arts to Tukong Moosul, me, Jimmy Higgins, not Won Ik Yi who was going to close the school and who can testify to the validity of these statements.

    So the bottom-line is, “Tukong” is an incorrect English translation of a Korean phrase spoken by a Texan, me. I spelled it as close phonetically as I could without any Korean help, which is why ALL native Korean speakers do not know what TUKONG is until they see the written Korean symbols. The word is wrong, but it is MY version of the phrase and as close as I could come to it in one word when I changed everything during the week I was in control of Master Yi's Shaolin Martial Arts school.

    Every time I or Master Kim meets a native Korean master, they ask what is Tukong? Master Kim will say it correctly and make it two words, or show them the symbols and then, and only then, do they know what “Tukong” is. It is much the same as a Texan trying to speak Spanish to a Mexican native. The Mexican will look at you weird and try to figure out what you are saying when you just murdered their language.

    I did the same with the Korean phrase. Won Ik Yi had nothing to do with creating either the word or what my marketing alluded to in the Special Combat units since he knew the school curriculum was Kung Fu and had nothing to do with what the Special Forces trained. I have never heard him claim to have created the word until now. I have always let him have the acclaim of creating the WTKMSF out of respect, but only an idiot would not realize why it was created and who did it, considering the events of the time of origin.

    If Won Ik Yi does not remember this or chooses to forget it, I have MANY witnesses that can attest to the facts of this. I have MANY witnesses that do not know the facts well, but do remember when I took over. I have many witnesses that do not have all the facts, but can prove the original name of the school had nothing to do with my word TUKONG before I got there. You can contact a civil attorney in Austin, Troy Harber. He was one of the original White Tiger students as mentioned and knew Craig Patterson as well.

    Additionally, you should know, it is verifiable that Won Ik Yi NEVER served in the Special Force Unit as is claimed in his literature. He was in the Headquarters unit. My Master, In Ki Kim was in the Special Force Unit as a first sergeant when Won Ik Yi came to pick him up from the headquarters unit to help change the Teuk Jong fighting program of the Special Forces. My Master, In Ki Kim is the ONLY Special Combat Unit Master in the United States from the original development team, but there are many Teuk Gong Masters here now that will GLADLY counter the idea that Won Ik Yi created the program. I would say In Ki Kim and I, as cofounders of the Tukong Moosul Association (TKMSA) have more right to file for a trademark on MY incorrectly spelled English version of the Korean translation of Special Combat, than does any Korean in the United States.

    Additionally, Won Ik Yi freely gave all materials and information to be used in any way wanted to not only my Master In Ki Kim, but also to another Master Won Kuk Kim who started Jungyea Moosul in Seattle with my help. Master Won Kuk Kim will GLADLY testify to this….

    http://www.jungyae.com/jungyae_moosul.html
    . Look closely at the year Jung Yea was created. You will see that it started the year AFTER Won Ik Yi, In Ki Kim, Won Kuk Kim and myself, had been living together for 9 months. It is VERY similar to Tukong and at one time used the exact same patch and logo, because Won Ik Yi had given Won Kuk Kim the rights to use any and all of the literature that he and I had created while WE made the World Tukong Moosul Federation

    ==================================

    Since I have been with Master In Ki Kim, he has actually taught me what he taught in the South Korean Special Force unit called the "Teuk Gong" unit. He and I have created a curriculum, NOT based on Kung Fu, but actually based on what they were taught for fighting and killing, when Master In Ki Kim was a Sergeant Instructor there. The classes and techniques we teach in the TKMSA are from real combat special forces training in South Korea.

    Recently, a former Captian at the Stafford County Sheriff’s Department, Rod Davis, who holds black belt degrees in other styles asked Master Kim to help him open a Tukong school. Captain Davis has seen every training program offered to police and SWAT teams from Gracie Jujitsu to Combat Hapkido for the last 30 years as a Sheriff’s Deputy.

    He reviewed a DVD that had comprehensive notes of all classes with diagrams and drawing written by 1st DAN Tukong Black Belt, Jeanette Eash who trained 5 years to learn and practice everything she wrote. Captain Davis told In Ki Kim that he could not teach Tukong because it was all about killing, injury and violence, and he did not know or had not learned the information he read about killing people in so many ways with so much detail. He was concerned that Master Kim and I had been teaching this information for years. Master Kim explained that we always do interviews, there is a probation period and we do not accept everyone who wants to train it.

    The American Tukong programs of the WTKMSF and the TKMSA are VASTLY different in content and focus. The split is due to my leaving the Austin version and becoming the student of In Ki Kim.

    Master Kim
    grew up angry after his father died when he was eight and he was a street fighter from a poor side of town that joined TKD so he could hit and kick people and not get in trouble for beating them up. He won the Korean National Teen TKD Championship by beating every other nationally top rated teen at the tournament at age 17, which can be verified. He was the Heavyweight Korean Military Gold medalist before the was recruited to help create the new combat training program of the new Teuk Gong units.

    Those Teuk Gong units had been ordered created by the President of Korea and organized by a couple of Generals before they had their 'gopher' (Go for this, Go for that) working in the headquarters unit, Won Ik Yi, contact In Ki Kim and 5 other champion Korean fighters to upgrade the present Tuk Jong program. That’s how the present American versions of Tukong originated.

    END of Part 2
    Last edited by tukong; 11/17/2006 3:48am at .
  3. babo78 is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/17/2006 12:30pm


     Style: Yudo, Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just two things I'm going to comment on...

    You kept emphasizing on spelling of Tukgong. I can tell you right off the bat that Tuek Gong, Tukgong, Tukkong, whichever you want to spell it in English... it all mean samething so don't be so concerned or bother about it (특공 and I think hanja is 特攻). It's just semantics.

    Quote Originally Posted by tukong
    Those Teuk Gong units had been ordered created by the President of Korea and organized by a couple of Generals before they had their 'gopher' (Go for this, Go for that) working in the headquarters unit, Won Ik Yi, contact In Ki Kim and 5 other champion Korean fighters to upgrade the present Tuk Jong program. That’s how the present American versions of Tukong originated
    Tukgong in South Korea was created in 1978 by Presidential Security Services Unit (initially 606th) after demonstration to Cha Ji Chul (차지철, Head of Presidential Security) and this was reported to President Park Jung Hee (박정희). In 1979, this was demonstrated at Chung Wah Deh (청와대).

    Starting 1981, it was approved and taught throughout the military.

    At this time is when 450ish soldiers (currently serving at the time) were selected to be elite personnel (정예요원). Those chosen were of extensive MA background during civilian life. Won Ik Yi and six others were selected as instructors. The instructors were teaching to add additional instructors.


    Now this is my question...
    This is first time I ever heard of Won Ik Yi or any of original instructors were selected to 'upgrade' Tukgong. My knowledge was that they were chosen to be teachers. Any proof or articles I can read this about that would back your statements?
  4. babo78 is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/17/2006 3:01pm


     Style: Yudo, Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt W.
    Wow. That was a really, really long post about a martial art I’ve never heard about and probably never will again. But thanks… I guess.

    What I found interesting about it, was how it so clearly demonstrated the complete bullshido that is so prevalent in Korean based MA. I mean, here you have a MA school that is forms based (dead training), heavy on etiquette, philosophy and emotion (people crying over “the school”???) to the point of being cult-like and that has a completely fabricated history. There is so much wrong with this story that I don’t even know where to begin.
    Well...post was woven with personal story and history of the MA. I have no idea about Tukgong history in US.

    But Tukgong history in South Korea is actually well documented and quite easy to filter out non-sense.
  5. Matt W. is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/17/2006 3:32pm

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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Wow. That was a really, really long post about a martial art I’ve never heard about and probably never will again. But thanks… I guess.

    What I found interesting about it, was how it so clearly demonstrated the complete bullshido that is so prevalent in Korean based MA. I mean, here you have a MA school that is forms based (dead training), heavy on etiquette, philosophy and emotion (people crying over “the school”???) to the point of being cult-like and that has a completely fabricated history. There is so much wrong with this story that I don’t even know where to begin.
  6. tukong is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/18/2006 2:40am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just two things I'm going to comment on...

    You kept emphasizing on spelling of Tukgong. I can tell you right off the bat that Tuek Gong, Tukgong, Tukkong, whichever you want to spell it in English... it all mean samething so don't be so concerned or bother about it (특공 and I think hanja is 特攻). It's just semantics.

    How true how true... But Won Ik Yi was trying to threaten me through an attorney/student to say that since he inveneted the word, he wanted a portion of any profits I made from teaching classes or selling items while using that specific word. So the second part was to the attorney of why he was not told the whole story of how the WORD TUKONG was created.

    The Part 2 was basically the letter that I sent the attorney to Shut the Hell Up! And he did.. We are still having a small battle the Department of Trademarks to see if he or I can trademark the Word TUKONG here in the USA. I never did worry about it until I got that letter from the attorney.


    Tukgong in South Korea was created in 1978 by Presidential Security Services Unit (initially 606th) after demonstration to Cha Ji Chul (차지철, Head of Presidential Security) and this was reported to President Park Jung Hee (박정희). In 1979, this was demonstrated at Chung Wah Deh (청와대).

    Starting 1981, it was approved and taught throughout the military.

    At this time is when 450ish soldiers (currently serving at the time) were selected to be elite personnel (정예요원). Those chosen were of extensive MA background during civilian life. Won Ik Yi and six others were selected as instructors. The instructors were teaching to add additional instructors.


    Now this is my question...
    This is first time I ever heard of Won Ik Yi or any of original instructors were selected to 'upgrade' Tukgong. My knowledge was that they were chosen to be teachers. Any proof or articles I can read this about that would back your statements?

    Well you have part of the question correct. I went back to Korea twice to research this and for other reasons. You have almost everything that I was told in Korea, so no big differences really that matter. I really could care less. But to answer your question...

    The Tukgong Unit was, as you wrote, the name of the group of men that train in a certain way with a bunch of specialized equipment and tactics. Inside the Tukgong Unit they have several programs for different parts of the mission training.

    In 1979, there was already a program in place to teach hand-to-hand combat called (not sure how to write it) Tuk Jong. I don't know what it means and I am sure I am murdering the phonetics. Well the General in Charge of the unit at the time was supposedly charged with improving the H2H training because of an incident with a captured N. Korean commando. (I have yet to meet anyone with first hand knowledge ot that explanation and Master In Ki Kim has heard it but also never met anyone who knows first hand about the story.)

    Anyway, the General pulls the files of several guys in the unit with MA backgrounds and tells his staff sergeant Won Ik Yi, who also had MA background to go collect these guys and bring them for a briefing. He does and there are 5 besides him in the meeting. The general orders them to upgrade the current program with any technique from any style they know or see. He wants to make sure that no matter who the Tukgong members fight on the battle field they will know the weakness and techniques of that style.

    Up to that point, the politicals had kept any other styles out of the military that were not Korean based. Every General and member of the Parliament had a Master that he was loyal to or had a son who had a Master that they were loyal to and they all want to keep the "Bloodline Pure Korean" when it came to training. So they had a mix of TKD, Hapkido and Udo (Korean Judo) for military training.

    Somebody with vision, saw that the Purity thing was not the best way tohave the best program, and wanted the program revamped ONLY for the most elite troops, Tukgong, and keep the others, regular army, ROK Marines, etc... pure.

    Who was the visionary? I don't know and neither does any one I have met or talked to. I have heard everything from the President to his bodyguards to the general in charge. No way of knowing so far. It seems to have been an idea promoted to a senior official and that was fleshed out and presented to top brass who saw the wisdom and agreed and then the orders were sent down the line to make it happen. Best I been able to glean from personal interviews in the USA and Korea.

    Once the 6 were assembled and given their orders, they basically got a 1 or 2 month (still in contention) pass to go to a remote base and work on changing the traditional TKD, Hapkido, Udo based program to a more focused and detailed program for killing and injury rather than sparring, fitness and self-defense. So they did.

    According to Won Ik Yi, my first master that I trained with for 4 years, he was the man who designed the program and presented it to the generals who then had him teach it to several sergeants that then taught it to the main soldiers.

    According to my current Master In Ki Kim, they went off and drank a lot and messed around all day with Bullshit stuff and finally pulled it together in the last week. Then they all went back and showed the generals. They showed the old and the differences in the new program. They demoed their stuff on several occasions to a few brass who then want to do a very formal presentation to the political and senior military staff for acceptance. Once that was done and the new program was approved, they wrote it up and started training all the other soldiers in large groups after teaching the platoon sergeants. And only to the Tukgong units.

    You can choose who you believe. I have verified what Master Kim has told me to a very good degree. Won Ik Yi's version is unsubstantiated and unverifiable to date. I have tried too.

    My friend, Jae Sic Choi was in the Tukgong Unit about 5 years ago. He has told me what they were doing then and it was not what Won Ik Yi or In Ki Kim taught me. It was advanced Hapkido with Kuk Sul Won and TKD with very little Udo. There were very few of the Killing techniques I have learned and it is much more focused on weaponry and use of the knife for hand to hand fighting. He did not know enough of what I teach to be considered more than a 1st degree Black Belt in my school, but had been in the Tukong Unit for 3 years.

    I went back to Korea to make sense of this with my Master when we were invited to teach the 3rd year Presidential Bodyguard students at Kyounggyi University. I know I spelled that wrong. Korean is not part of my training.

    They has supposedly been trained by a Tukgong instructor, but when they showed us what he taught them, it was just Hapkido that was not very effective for bodyguards. It was self-defense based stuff not aggressor based.

    What they did know was not the best techncially and none of them could put either myself or Master Kim on the ground or in a control technique if we did the least bit of resistance. So their Tukgong training sucked.

    The school administrators and instructors were embarrassed that these two men from America had better training and skills than anyone they knew. They actaully made Master Kim an honorary professor, not just for political reasons. I declined the 'honor' and wanted to know why the Tukgong had changed and degraded so much back to Koreans martial arts stuff?

    Well, the best that Master Kim and I pieced together was that some time around 1990, some general was placed in charge that was very loyal to a Hapkido Master because of blood relations or political debt and he changed the training to have a lot of that Master's signature moves for demos. From there, it seems every Tom Dick and Kim put more moves from his Master or brother or Uncles into the program and it became just a really impressive demo program with little left from the original killing-focused training.

    So When Jae Sic Choi was there, he already had a 3rd Degree in Hapkido and 3rd in TKD. He said his Master's Hapkido was much better than what was taught in the unit training so he actually taught his Master's stuff to his squad. So much for uniformity.

    When Master Kim and I demoed how to kill assailants to the 3rd Years, they were shocked and mortified by some of our techniques. During their shooting range training they had been taught police and military training to double tap a moving target while they were stationary at set shooting stations.

    Even SWAT in the USA makes their guys move and shoot stationary targets. So we made them not only move and shoot protected targets on the range but we also made them have to grab a person by the arm or shoulder and push them through course as if they are pushing their 'principal' who has no clue, out of the kill zone of an ambush.

    They do not get the luxury to use one hand to fire and one hand to steady the other. And they fire while moving instead of while stationary. They must fire with both left and right hands but always keep one hand on the person they are guarding. They had to learn how to fire accurately with only one hand, both left and right side to train.

    They were all freaking out about why they had not trained that way for 3 years already instead of only the last 4 months of their training? Basically, the guys teaching them did not know what they were doing. Duh.

    So the Tukgong program now is much different than what was first designed by the original six. As to articles written about that? I got all my info from direct personal interviews. I do not trust written accounts since I have been misquoted and mis-reported so many times. I just don't trust written accounts unless it is written specifically by the guy who was there and doing it. Best I can offer is talk with Anyone you can find that was there.

    You were right. The 6 were instructors. But they were the original instructors because they were the ones that developed the training program. I was told there were only 3 forms taught, one with a knife, one with a shovel they all carried and 1 for a a tree branch or handle (staff). All other weapons were taught as techniques only without forms. The forms were added only as part of a demo for the brass by request.

    I don't know that that will answer your question, but it's all I have learned and how I learned it.

    I am Jimmy Higgins. I was there.
    Last edited by tukong; 11/19/2006 6:12pm at .
  7. tukong is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/18/2006 2:51am


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by babo78
    Well...post was woven with personal story and history of the MA. I have no idea about Tukgong history in US.

    But Tukgong history in South Korea is actually well documented and quite easy to filter out non-sense.
    Yeah, I have seen those 8 different (and still counting) versions of well-documented history of Tuek Gong that don't match and have 8 different guys as the founder.

    Yeah, in Korea they have a very well-docmented version for each man. Very impressive. Keep dreaming. ;)

    Personally, I could care less. I mean really what difference does it make? If the present system is good then taking credit for it has to go to every Martial Arts Master for the last 5000 years that helped advance fighting skills. I think it is really whiny and petty to have a big stinkfest over who started it.

    Sounds like a bunch of little kids.......He started it! No he did. No he did not, I started it! No you did not my Master did. Your Master sucks! Oh yeah well my Master knows more and can beat up your Master.... blah blah blah... Who cares?

    Show me your stuff and let's just learn from each other and then teach what we know to the new guys. I just see so much negative energy and wasted air on stuff that really does not make a difference when somebody is facing a whacko or a trained fighter.

    I am Jimmy Higgins. I was there.
  8. tukong is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/18/2006 3:01am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Matt W.
    Wow. That was a really, really long post about a martial art I’ve never heard about and probably never will again. But thanks… I guess.

    What I found interesting about it, was how it so clearly demonstrated the complete bullshido that is so prevalent in Korean based MA. I mean, here you have a MA school that is forms based (dead training), heavy on etiquette, philosophy and emotion (people crying over “the school”???) to the point of being cult-like and that has a completely fabricated history. There is so much wrong with this story that I don’t even know where to begin.
    Well said brother!

    But not just Korean MA. All of this is just politics that occurs in every organization from Professional Speedskating to Rubic cube championships. There are always people wanting to claim they were first or the original or one of the founders. But you know what? It all seems to come full circle to MONEY in the end.

    I know that I made the marketing with it to make it stand out from the crowd and get more students. That was the total motivation. ANd whether it is a program for retarded gerbils or a new convention hall for special olympics, it usually still come back to money. Did you hear about the United Way scandal?

    Anway, I wrote this because Won Ik Yi's followers keep changing my post in Wikipedia on the History of Tukong. They keep putting up some real creative stuff. Go read Wiki's History of Tukong if you want to have a contrast to my version.

    But I agree with everything you said.

    I am Jimmy Higgins. I was there.
    Last edited by tukong; 11/18/2006 3:04am at .
  9. babo78 is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2006 8:21am


     Style: Yudo, Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by tukong
    Yeah, I have seen those 8 different (and still counting) versions of well-documented history of Tuek Gong that don't match and have 8 different guys as the founder.

    Yeah, in Korea they have a very well-docmented version for each man. Very impressive. Keep dreaming. ;)

    Personally, I could care less. I mean really what difference does it make? If the present system is good then taking credit for it has to go to every Martial Arts Master for the last 5000 years that helped advance fighting skills. I think it is really whiny and petty to have a big stinkfest over who started it.

    Sounds like a bunch of little kids.......He started it! No he did. No he did not, I started it! No you did not my Master did. Your Master sucks! Oh yeah well my Master knows more and can beat up your Master.... blah blah blah... Who cares?

    Show me your stuff and let's just learn from each other and then teach what we know to the new guys. I just see so much negative energy and wasted air on stuff that really does not make a difference when somebody is facing a whacko or a trained fighter.

    I am Jimmy Higgins. I was there.
    I understand what you are saying. The details are quite ugly but it's much better documented and able to be traced back if someone in proper position really decided to do so. Plus 8 varied documentation is probably hella better than say compared to HwaRang or TKD which has so many turns and twists.

    As for level of documentation, it's the overall broad spectrum that's well captured and concise. What purpose it was created for (Anti-Terrorism/Military MA), what year (1978), where the art originated (606th) and not the people taking credit for it. Whatever each of the original instructors stated, the fact remains concise in broad things I spoke above.

    Things in between....like "I or he was instructor who revamped Tukgong to incorporate Headbutt as part of training" (Which I know is claimed by one of the instructors) OR the r3al Tukgong is still only taught to Tuk Jun Sa (and we're the only ones that really know it) are all the noises that clutter it up.
  10. babo78 is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/20/2006 8:27am


     Style: Yudo, Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by tukong
    How true how true... But Won Ik Yi was trying to threaten me through an attorney/student to say that since he inveneted the word, he wanted a portion of any profits I made from teaching classes or selling items while using that specific word. So the second part was to the attorney of why he was not told the whole story of how the WORD TUKONG was created.

    The Part 2 was basically the letter that I sent the attorney to Shut the Hell Up! And he did.. We are still having a small battle the Department of Trademarks to see if he or I can trademark the Word TUKONG here in the USA. I never did worry about it until I got that letter from the attorney.

    I don't know that that will answer your question, but it's all I have learned and how I learned it.
    In context of trademark, yeah you'd have to be carefull with spelling. I'm no legal expert but I don't think you can trademark just TukGong. That's like trying to trademark Spike instead of Spike TV or Lucky instead of Lucky Strikes. Tukgong is too broad of word to be trademarked? Anyway, good luck with that and thanks for insight. Gives some perspective of inside politics.
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