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  1. MEGALEF is offline

    Still digging on James Brown

    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Lund, Sweden
    Posts
    1,333

    Posted On:
    11/09/2006 9:52am


     Style: BJJ & Judo (1k)

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
  2. JohnnyS is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
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    Posted On:
    11/09/2006 5:02pm

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Actually I think Polefighter has hit closest on the solution. You need to have a goal. Whether it be hitting a certain guard pass, going for a certain choke or a sweep etc, if you have a goal then you're the one pushing the buttons and your opponent will be reacting to you.
  3. Charles Choi is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    14

    Posted On:
    11/09/2006 5:03pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by oldman34
    It seems that the problem is two fold.

    1. You are unsure of your skills...hence the hesitation. You dont want to lose but you do want to win. Take chances my friend. It is the only way you will learn.

    2. You seem also to be the type that doesnt want to hurt another player, intentionally or unintentionally. This isnt a bad trait. You are treating someone like you want to be treated.

    Now how to get past that.

    1. Practice. Have some confidence. Instead of concentrating on what you did wrong all the time, look at what you did right and go from there. It is called practice for a reason. Take a chance with a move. If it doesnt work then you learned from it. Have another move ready in case that one fails. Plan ahead. This is how you become sure of your skills.

    2. Becoming more familiar with your training partners helps here. Have a beer/ get something to eat after class with them. (If you dont like their personality, well dont do this.)
    Get to know them, and the level they want to train at. Ask them before you start to roll....Want to go 100%? or 50%? Dont feel bad if you black their eye, or hurt them a little bit, if you dont go around acting like an ass most people will realize you didnt do it on purpose. Be forgiving if someone hurts you. Realize that it was most likely a mistake and **** happens.


    Just my 2 cents.....

    I think this is a good summary of what I was going to post.

    Often, it's a knowledge based thing. If we don't know how to interact in sparring, then we often get caught in things. At that point, we become defensive for fear of it happening again.

    I think that a better word is to utilise your 'offensive' or 'attacking' game. Aggressive can give you a different feel.

    As suggested, and as I do quite often, I ask the senior grades to let me attack more. They happily oblige, and I get a whole heap better for it, and they get better at reversals/counters.

    -Charles
  4. Spyder230 is offline

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Chilliwack, BC, Canada
    Posts
    3

    Posted On:
    11/09/2006 6:18pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Ju Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks

    These suggests are great !!!! And I definetly believe this gives me lots to work on, and

    focus on next randori.
  5. Goju - Joe is offline
    Goju - Joe's Avatar

    I am a Ninja bitches!! Deal with it

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    Nov 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    7,856

    Posted On:
    11/09/2006 11:38pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Improv comedy

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have a similar problem and recently have found a solution. STEROIDS!!!!

    Just kidding

    Seriously though for the last while I have found that I am getting tapped a lot. My bug issue was getting swept and the other person getting side control and just wearing me down.

    So I worked steadily on two things.

    Getting one sure fire sweep and reversal from side control.

    I kept trying and practicing stuff for the last 2 months. I don't care if I get tapped all I am looking for is those 2 things, 1 good sweep and side control reversal.

    So recently I have found that I can now do both fairly well and it has helped me in so many ways. Now I can get mount and work a number of submissions there, the one I have been working the most on from mount is shoulder choke to Americana.

    Anyways the point is "position before submission"

    If you can a "go to sweep" to start a match off with and a reversal from your weakest position the rest of your game will follow.

    my 2 cents
  6. GoldenJonas is offline

    Light Heavyweight

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    Jan 2006
    Location
    Orlando, Florida
    Posts
    3,378

    Posted On:
    11/10/2006 12:10am

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Follow Gojo and Poles advice and Jonnhy's analogy regarding you pushing the buttons more than reacting to having your buttons pushed is priceless and honestly is garnered from years of experience.

    I have found that my pausing between transitions is due largeley to NOT having a plan or a goal like the others have said. My instructor is constantly telling me to "stay active", have an "active guard" whether closed or open, KEEP MOVING!!! Shrimping, transitioning between the different side controls, etc...

    Not being afraid to tap is good because if you pull a bad position you just tap, start over, and don't do it again. Keep at it; if anything your ahead of people who get stuck because they don't work on their escapes enough.
  7. JohnnyS is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
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    1,139

    Posted On:
    11/10/2006 1:06am

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm going to repeat myself here, but it's just so easy to waste time in BJJ by not having a goal.

    Let's say I'm working on my guard: If all I do is move a lot and annoy my opponent but never actually put him in danger, my guard isn't improving. My guard recovery skills *may* improve, but maybe not. I would develop a better guard much faster if I had a goal such as open guard and said to myself "I'm going to get this grip on my opponent straight away, put my foot in his hip and stretch him out" All of sudden, instead of reacting to my opponent, my opponent has to react to me and to work on getting his arm back, and my foot off his hip. As he tries to do these things, he opens himself up to sweeps and submissions. So while all I'm doing is essentially getting my grips, to all appearances I'm being more aggressive and my opponent is being more defensive.
  8. rino86 is offline

    Lightweight

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Dallas Tx
    Posts
    151

    Posted On:
    11/10/2006 1:44pm

    supporting member
     Style: Bjj/Machado/Pittman

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You know, John Machado did a seminar at my school last night and he actually talked a little about this. He was showing guard passes and explained how sometimes he'll play "the old man" game where he moves slowly and gently and reactions to his opponent, then sometimes he'll play the aggressive game and force his opponents to react and use more explosive technique.

    He recommended we play with this idea and practice switching between these two styles, and eventually we would learn when to get aggressive and when to be more passive and methodical.
  9. chingythingy is offline

    Senior Member

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    Feb 2006
    Posts
    1,166

    Posted On:
    11/11/2006 6:28am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I wasn't naturally aggressive to start. I had two things help:

    1. I found if I'm more relaxed at the beginning, I'm more fluid in transitions and more aggressive. If I'm more tense I tend to try and power moves and end up in a defensive or strength game.
    2. I needed to work a series of 3 attacks from the guard and from the top. Try one, flow to another, to a third, back to first. Like in guard, break their posture, get legs up high closer to rubber guard, attack arm bar, triangle, omoplata. If you don't get resistance, finish. If you do, switch to the next attack.

    Pre-planning the series of 3 helped me move away from a defensive game to an offensive game. After playing that for a while, I could add to the list of 3, and it all started flowing more naturally.
    Last edited by chingythingy; 11/11/2006 6:30am at .
  10. GIJoe6186 is offline
    GIJoe6186's Avatar

    An American Hero!

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    Long Island,NY
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    1,974

    Posted On:
    11/11/2006 3:02pm

    Business Class Supporting Membersupporting member
     TryKickboxingNow.com - Free Internet Marketing for Kickboxing Programs! Style: BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    After reading this it just seems your too scared to do anything. So Nike up, just do it. Since you seem to scared or unsure about yourself just go for a sub and follow through no matter what. Say you have gaurd on a guy. Say to yourself "armbar" and go for it. When he starts to counter just keep working on it. Even if you feel your loosing the battle, hang on and deal with it if you get reversed. This may not be a good strategy in a match but for learning to just throw it to the wind and give your all, I think its a good idea. Its all I could think of.
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