223771 Bullies, 3797 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 71 to 80 of 80
Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. ar549 is offline
    ar549's Avatar

    Banned for failing to live up to the standards he expected of others and wasting more time on calling out forum military members' credentials than he spent in his own military career.

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    643

    Posted On:
    12/05/2006 10:31am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Bulldogging

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You guys can go to Daniels website and download a free short movie on forging damascus here.

    http://www.ferrum.cc/en/online/videos.html





  2. bricco is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    199

    Posted On:
    12/05/2006 5:13pm


     Style: Ju-Jitsu, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I can't thank you enough: that's exactly what I was looking for.
    Please, if you ever come across another video like this let us know, thank you.
  3. hangooknamja88 is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    15

    Posted On:
    12/14/2006 2:05am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: TaeKwonDo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    is there a way to forge a blade with only 600-900 temp heat?
  4. Rock Ape is offline
    Rock Ape's Avatar

    Watch and Shoot !

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    10,128

    Posted On:
    12/14/2006 10:58am

    staff
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hey guys..

    As a student of JSA and ownder of a gendai forged and folded toshin, I'd be very pleased to see what results you get.

    Regards

    Dave
    "To sin by silence when one should protest makes cowards out of men".

    ~Ella Wheeler
  5. King Sleepless is offline
    King Sleepless's Avatar

    I am a living legend!

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Cuba
    Posts
    10,048

    Posted On:
    12/14/2006 12:08pm

    supporting member
     Style: Tatsumaki Senpuu Kyaku

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ewwwwwww ar549 posted in my thread that was going places. :(
  6. bricco is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    199

    Posted On:
    12/16/2006 5:33am


     Style: Ju-Jitsu, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here.

  7. JaredB is offline

    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    1

    Posted On:
    8/08/2010 2:36am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Thai Kwan Do and MMA

    -1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    So, this is a really good article for the most part, but you left out a few crucial details.
    First is the fact that most katana are made from steels of multiple strengths. Traditional Japanese smiths would forge their own steels and select from hard and soft steels to include in their blades.
    Usually, katana are forged from as many as four pieces of steel, arranged for their properties during combat.
    The hardest steel is used for the blade, and placed in the center and on the blade side of the Katana before the various pieces are forged together. The softest steel is used for the spine. And two pieces of a mid-level steel are used to form the sides. These varying hardnesses allow the Katana to retain it's edge and absorb impacts that might otherwise cripple the effectiveness of the blade in combat.
    Also, the substance used to coat blades before tempering and quenching the blades wasn't simply clay. It was a mixture of clay, ash, and metal filings. The clay was painted onto the spine of the blade, leaving the edge exposed. The use of clay is also what gives Katana their signature wavy pattern along the edge. This pattern also serves as the signature of the swordsmith and so is very important.
    Something you left out about the sharpening of the blade is also crucial. Unlike in western blades, which use a straight angle bevel, Japanese blades curve to a point. This is what makes them such efficient cutters. Material flows smoothly past the edge of the blade, meaning that less friction is created and cutting becomes easier.
  8. Tamashī no gizō is offline

    Join Date
    May 2013
    Posts
    1

    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 8:19am

    Bullshido Newbie
     

    0
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    they made their own iron by taking black sand aka iron oxide sand, and adding charcoal
    to form a giant chunk of metal, then they break of pieces heat them up and hammer them to purify and stack the pieces together to form a billet. the rest is pretty explainatory. by-the-by i know this tadbit and i'm only 16. :D
  9. jnp is offline
    jnp's Avatar

    Titanium laced beauty

    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    8,226

    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 8:42am

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ, wrestling

    2
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamashī no gizō View Post
    they made their own iron by taking black sand aka iron oxide sand, and adding charcoal
    to form a giant chunk of metal, then they break of pieces heat them up and hammer them to purify and stack the pieces together to form a billet. the rest is pretty explainatory. by-the-by i know this tadbit and i'm only 16. :D
    I will leave this post in the Armory because it is on topic. However, you should know that most teenagers don't last around here, especially the ones with a holier than thou attitude.

    I know this and I'm only 44.

    Read the stickies and take the time to familiarize yourself with the different posting standards in the individual forums. They are all different and some, like this one, the Armory, are strictly moderated.
  10. hungryjoe is offline
    hungryjoe's Avatar

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Oklahoma
    Posts
    3,404

    Posted On:
    5/01/2013 6:57pm

    supporting member
     Style: judo hiatus

    1
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tamashī no gizō View Post
    they made their own iron by taking black sand aka iron oxide sand, and adding charcoal
    to form a giant chunk of metal, then they break of pieces heat them up and hammer them to purify and stack the pieces together to form a billet. the rest is pretty explainatory. by-the-by i know this tadbit and i'm only 16. :D
    The charcoal, in addition to being used as fuel for heat, imparts carbon into the steel. You can't have hardness without the added carbon.

    The poster above you is incorrect as the differences in hardness of various parts of the blade are the result of tempering. Tempering draws back the hardness to a given point needed for a particular application. Too brittle means chips/breaks easily. Too soft and you can't hold an edge.

    The folding of the steel during the forging process, in addition to gaining needed carbon, changes the grain of the steel at the molecular level, leaving a blade less likely to break at a given point if the above mentioned temper is correct for the application.

    I'm 53 and a life long tool and die maker. See what I did there?

    Anyway, thanks for chiming in as this is the first I've seen of this thread.
Page 8 of 8 FirstFirst ... 45678

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.