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  1. #31
    jubei33's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sirc
    You must've not read the article. I've only made a small knife.
    no, I read it. Whats with all the 'geometry of the katana' ---Im not really trying to burn you or anything, I just kinda want to know where you're coming from and where this info is coming from.

  2. #32

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    Erm... I think you forgot to say that a katana is made of San Mai damascus steel.
    Let me explain: while it is not necessary for a sword to be made this way, those that are made so are a lot more flexible and resilient than those made of a single bar of steel.
    Ideally, you should create two kinds of damascus steel (and by this I mean laminated steel of different carbon alloy). You should have a core of tougher, more laminated steel and two lateral parts more flexible and tender: this way you get a decent edge and a good flexibility.
    Sure, things can get more complex: you may come across swords with a "backbone" of higly flexible steel, or some with even four different kind of steel.

    That said, I should add that I am no Yoshihara: I just made a pair of knives and a damascus billet with a forge made from an old BBQ.

  3. #33

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    Quote Originally Posted by bricco
    Erm... I think you forgot to say that a katana is made of San Mai damascus steel.
    Let me explain: while it is not necessary for a sword to be made this way, those that are made so are a lot more flexible and resilient than those made of a single bar of steel.
    Ideally, you should create two kinds of damascus steel (and by this I mean laminated steel of different carbon alloy). You should have a core of tougher, more laminated steel and two lateral parts more flexible and tender: this way you get a decent edge and a good flexibility.
    Sure, things can get more complex: you may come across swords with a "backbone" of higly flexible steel, or some with even four different kind of steel.

    That said, I should add that I am no Yoshihara: I just made a pair of knives and a damascus billet with a forge made from an old BBQ.
    Damascene steel is kind of a misnomer in modern times. No one is really sure how it was made however there are some methods used to replicate it that have good results. What you are talking about is Patern welded steel. A process where different types of steel, or sometimes nickel. This methodology while making a good strong blade is not really the traditional method used by Japanese smiths.

    The method used by Japanese smiths is a folding method where you take a peice of Mild steel heat->lenghten->fold back on itself->forge weld->legthen->Fold back on itself->Forge weld.....You get the idea. This creates a similar state to a pattern weld or modern "Damascus" steel. You also perform a similar series of folds and welds with a Patern billet.

  4. #34

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    I stand corrected; I used the term given most of the time to the pattern welded steel.
    However, the method you described produces a series of layers that are actually alloys of different carbon content: the mild steel used for the initial rod acquires a thin film of higly carbonated steel each time is put back in the forge.
    To avoid the trouble and to do this more quickly it is better to use industrial steel of different kinds and forge solder it.

  5. #35

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    Quote Originally Posted by bricco
    I stand corrected; I used the term given most of the time to the pattern welded steel.
    However, the method you described produces a series of layers that are actually alloys of different carbon content: the mild steel used for the initial rod acquires a thin film of higly carbonated steel each time is put back in the forge.
    To avoid the trouble and to do this more quickly it is better to use industrial steel of different kinds and forge solder it.
    All true. I have made knives this way and the high carbon that forms either chips off or is fused into the blade adding to its strenght durning the process. The best method for stregnth is to legnthen,weld, twist, legnthen weld ect.

    It is easier to use a laminate however making that laminate can be a real bitch do to the difference in melting/weld tempretures.

    Like most things it is easy to write an article on how to do somthing but with out hands on it is really impractical. It was like the earlier statment about "do not hit your blank too hard" Well this all depends, if you are useing the methods you see on television or movies where smiths swing over they head and back down then yeah you will screw it up. However if you swing from the elbow and let the hammer do the work then you are pretty safe.

    Also Bricco you can make a better forge for about $100 if you are looking to do some work.

  6. #36

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    I'm always open for improvement. How can I do it?

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by bricco
    I'm always open for improvement. How can I do it?
    I'll PM you with some diagrams. You may need to upgrade your blower or modify it.

    PT

  8. #38

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    As you can see, I'm a noobie. So I do not know how to use the PMs: whenerver I try to PM someone, it comes out that I am not allowed to, and when I try to read my own messages I simply can't find how.
    Can you help me?

  9. #39

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    Quote Originally Posted by bricco
    As you can see, I'm a noobie. So I do not know how to use the PMs: whenerver I try to PM someone, it comes out that I am not allowed to, and when I try to read my own messages I simply can't find how.
    Can you help me?
    My guess is that it is because you are a noobie tht you cannot send or receive messages yet. I will hit up your zoints account with a link to the diagram and such when i get a chance. Work is killing me right now.

    PT

  10. #40

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    *Sigh* Do I have to get a freaking first dan in Bullshido to use PMs? Oh boy...

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