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  1. kracker is offline

    Registered Member

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    Jul 2006
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    Posted On:
    10/20/2006 5:00pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    will my stressbuster kill me?

    Hey there again. I have another question. I am a university student with a fair amount of time between classes and I work out (we have a great gym) 5 times a week simply because university life is stressful and I really dont like using drinking or drugs (especially the legal kind ex paxil, prozac). No I am not a devout Christian "you gonna go to hell" fuckwit it just doesnt make me feel good. Working out is the only real way I can effectively unload stress and it works great for me despite still being only 145 lbs. I have insane recovery time and I am never tired for more than 10 minutes after a workout. However I am constantly told 5x/week isn't good and I should only be training one, two or at very most three times a week (yeah screw you lazy bastards is what I think) but seriously I was just wondering, is there actually even any solid scientiffic proof training 5x week is ineffective/dangerous?
  2. Andrew L. is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/20/2006 5:46pm


     Style: Still searching...

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It all depends on what exactly your doing when you work out. As far as making gains working out 5 days a week will be significantly different than a normal workout scheme (i.e. 2-3 fullbody days a week). As long as you are doing all your excercises in good form and not overtraining (getting weaker and weaker day, feeling abnormally tired) it should not harm you. However if you expect to get stronger like you would on a normal (fullbody) workout program you wont. You have to think of working out at a stimulas, working out alot tells your body it needs more energy so your muscles will store more glycogen and your endurance will improve over time. Working out with heavy weight (80% or greater of your 1rm), but infrequently will tell your body it needs to be stronger and you will adapt accordingly. Working out to often just tells your body it needs to be more efficient and store more energy; but could also result in overtraining. If your goal is just effeciency, endurance, or muscle memory then 5 days a week isnt bad, as long as your not overtraining.
  3. pauli is offline

    i keep tryin to spar, but nothin happens!

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    Posted On:
    10/20/2006 6:35pm

    supporting member
     Style: karate / bjj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    if you enjoy working out a lot (and if that's why you're doing it in the first place), and you aren't getting injured, **** it and keep going.

    it's *likely* that if you aren't exhausted at the end of your workouts and sore for the next couple days, you aren't doing them right, but that's a different matter.
  4. rush2024 is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/27/2006 1:03pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A. Go to bodybuilding.com and read, or pick up any copy of Muscle & Fitness, Flex, Iron Man, etc ever published and read. All of your questions will be answered.

    Directly on topic though, you have not mentioned whether you are working out with weights, treadmills, bikes, whatever. Cardio can go every day - jogging, biking, swimming, etc. However, even folks whose main bag is endurance activities, like marathoners and triathletes, even gymnasts, taking time off between sessions.

    The issue is intensity - how hard are you pushing yourself. With weights, a general rule of thumb is that you should have at least one day of rest in between working a bodypart again. If you lift legs on Monday, you should not lift legs until at least Wednesday. However, it would be perfectly acceptable to lift arms on Tuesday, etc.

    Powerlifters often use a split with deadlifts on one day, squats another, and benches another (with appropriate assistance exercises if necessary), with a week or more rest between a repeat of a type of session. Rest is key if you are working with intensity.

    If your just doing lightweights, more akin to endurance training, then the rest factor is clearly less.

    Finally, the idea of systemic response requiring a workout to be full body is crap. There is no real data to support this theory, which likely evolved out of the general stimulus argument applied to squats.

    PS: Do squats. If you're not squatting, your not working out. Leg presses do not count unless you have a spinal problem.
  5. Gringo Grande is offline
    Gringo Grande's Avatar

    Ninjer Pile on Me! Hurr!

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    The Warsaw Ghettos/Gainesville, FL
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    Posted On:
    10/27/2006 1:20pm

    supporting member
     Style: Bad KB, Worse MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If you were doing a real workout, you'd be tired and sore the next day. Excuse me for not buying this.

    GG
    MMA Record vs Llamas 0-1-0
    (The Llama bit my junk but the ref didn't see it).
  6. Andrew L. is offline

    Registered Member

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    Posted On:
    10/27/2006 8:58pm


     Style: Still searching...

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by rush2024
    A. Go to bodybuilding.com and read, or pick up any copy of Muscle & Fitness, Flex, Iron Man, etc ever published and read. All of your questions will be answered.

    Directly on topic though, you have not mentioned whether you are working out with weights, treadmills, bikes, whatever. Cardio can go every day - jogging, biking, swimming, etc. However, even folks whose main bag is endurance activities, like marathoners and triathletes, even gymnasts, taking time off between sessions.

    The issue is intensity - how hard are you pushing yourself. With weights, a general rule of thumb is that you should have at least one day of rest in between working a bodypart again. If you lift legs on Monday, you should not lift legs until at least Wednesday. However, it would be perfectly acceptable to lift arms on Tuesday, etc.

    Powerlifters often use a split with deadlifts on one day, squats another, and benches another (with appropriate assistance exercises if necessary), with a week or more rest between a repeat of a type of session. Rest is key if you are working with intensity.

    If your just doing lightweights, more akin to endurance training, then the rest factor is clearly less.

    Finally, the idea of systemic response requiring a workout to be full body is crap. There is no real data to support this theory, which likely evolved out of the general stimulus argument applied to squats.

    PS: Do squats. If you're not squatting, your not working out. Leg presses do not count unless you have a spinal problem.
    If your referring to my post your definitely misunderstanding what i said. What i meant was the intensity you lift weights with determines how your body adapts. I didnt say anything about fullbody workouts having to do anything with a systemic response. I was just using fullbody workouts as an example of a workout scheme.
  7. Torakaka is offline
    Torakaka's Avatar

    Do you eat breakfast?

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    Posted On:
    10/27/2006 9:11pm

    supporting member
     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I sometimes go periods of working out 6 days a week, 3 hours a day and it hasn't killed me so far (though I've recently not been training much at all)
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  8. colonelpong2 is offline

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    10/30/2006 11:45pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Kickboxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Unles you have injuries, I would mention suggest a minimum of 20 hours a week to be a good, healthy regime.
  9. Res Judicata is offline

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    11/02/2006 3:11pm


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by rush2024
    A. Go to bodybuilding.com and read, or pick up any copy of Muscle & Fitness, Flex, Iron Man, etc ever published and read. All of your questions will be answered.
    For the love of God, do not do that. BB.com and the newstand rags are the strength and conditioning equivalent of bullshido. So much cluelessness and misinformation there . . . Read t-nation.com if you must read anything.

    You can train 5x a week, as long as you do the appropriate kinds of splits. Now, whether that is the most productive thing for you or not is a different story. Personally, I like 3x week full body, but I am old fashioned.

    Whether or not you are tired after your workout is partially a function of your set rep scheme and how hard you work -- if you are working very high percentages of your 1RM with olympic lifts, for example (i.e. hitting CNS) your body wont feel as tired. But that doesnt seem like what you are doing.

    I bet you are doing high rep (8+) isolation work, arent you? And steady state cardio (e.g. jogging for 30 minutes)

    Do 20 rep breathing squats and tell you are not tired; hit heavy deadlifts and tell me are not tired.

    Also, at 145 (depending on height) you area skinny bitch. EAT. You need to do heavy compound exercises and eat. If your recovery time is really that good, you pack on some mass and strength pretty fast.

    Come back here with your routine and diet and maybe someone can help you with it.

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