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  1. Aesopian is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/09/2006 11:31pm

    Business Class Supporting Member
     Aesopian.com 

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Heel Drag Side Control Escape

    This is another move I made up through necessity and by accident.

    Now I'm sure I'll get people telling me that their judo sensei totally taught it to them and no way dude I've totally seen some guy do this before and there are only so many ways to move the body and there is nothing new under the sun and pankration did this move first you thief.

    But I'm the one putting up the technique so I'll say whatever I want about it.

    Actually, if I owe anyone for this escape, it's probably Roy Harris. My first good mount escape (and still my favorite) is the heel drag, which he showed on his website as a drill to improve hip movement. Somehow, I mutated this move and applied it to escaping side control and the end result is a knee crank that ends with me in half guard.

    Sounds fun, huh? Then let's get to it.



    I have been caught under side control. They are clasping their hands around my upper body and head. I have my right foot on my left knee to close the space around my stomach so they have less room to take mount.



    Most important of all, despite being under side control, I have good posture. My arms are between his chest and mine, with my elbows in and my hands by my face. My left forearm is across his neck and my right hand is by my cheek, defending the crossface. My left elbow is inside his arm, since he will be trying to underhook it to lock down the position.

    Regardless of what escape I want to do, having correct posture is extremely important. If he's underhooking my arms or trapping them with his knees, I'll have trouble with any escape. If I'm spazzing out and hugging him or grabbing over his back or headlocking him, I'm just preventing myself from escaping. And I must have reverted back to being a gotarded white belt or something.

    If you take anything away from this, it should be the importance of proper posture. This escape and most others won't mean much without it.



    To begin the heel drag escape, I straighten my right leg (the one nearest to their knee) as I use the other one to turn my hips on their side.



    I step over with my left leg over and hunt for their leg, trying to hook my heel on the far side of it.

    Someone with a good top game will hide their foot so you can't hook it this easily, so don't get your heart too set on this escape if you can't hook their leg after 2-3 tries. Give up on it for the moment and just go back to the normal elbow-escapes and such.

    But while you're doing your standard escapes, you may find that you're forcing them to scramble to keep you down, and they'll often leave their leg out by accident, giving you just what you need to nail this escape.

    So like all moves, use this in combination with others, not as a one-shotter.



    I catch their ankle and drag my heel back, lifting their foot as their knee gets blocked by my thigh.



    I bend my leg, trying to bring my heel to my butt, so their foot slides up behind the back of my knee. This adjustment is what traps their leg (so they can't drive up and pull their foot out) and is what really makes the move work.



    I scissors my legs, stepping on the floor with my left foot as I try to bring my right leg under their knee. I also hip into them like I want to roll them to my left (which will actually happen sometimes). This creates a knee cranking pressure that can hurt pretty bad, and they will usually try to relieve it by lifting their knee and straightening their leg, making it easier for you to pass your right leg under it.



    From above, you can see how harshly I have twisted their leg. I am still cranking their leg back with their ankle trapped behind my bent knee. My right leg has now passed to the other side, giving me half guard. I am bending my leg and using it to block their knee from trying to drive back out to side control.



    To relieve the pressure on their knee, they will drive it to their right, which firmly lands them in my half guard. My escape is now complete. Next begins the half guard game, but we'll go over that another day.

    Huzzah.
    Last edited by Aesopian; 10/09/2006 11:44pm at .
  2. Shuma-Gorath is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/09/2006 11:40pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ - Homeland Security

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I use this all the time. Anyone having a hard time under sidemount should love this.
    Quote Originally Posted by The Wastrel
    I think the forum's traditionally light-handed approach to moderation has become untenable.
  3. Cassius is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 12:00am

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Once again, a technique pretty much everyone is taught, but with some of the intricacies of what kind of pressure to apply that few seem to know. Before I pick out the things that I found most important, a little newb warning: If you suck, don't keep your close leg up like Aeso has it in the first picture. Just because Aeso has enough sense to straighten his leg to counter the inevitable leg and hip smashing attempt from your opponent doesn't mean you do.

    Anyway, from what I've seen, most people mess up right around pictures 4, 5, and 6. Sometimes it's hard to get the right pressure on your opponent to get his leg up in the air. Here's a little trick I use (hopefully it makes sense): If you think about it in terms of how best to torque the knee instead of worrying about actually getting the foot and shin off the ground, you might have more luck. It works for me, at least.

    Tip numero dos:

    How not to jack up transitioning from picture 5 to picture 6:
    Try to feel out a secure "grip" on your opponent's leg with the pit of your knee while maximizing torque on your opponent's knee. You'll know it when you feel it.

    Feeling the technique out in terms of those two concepts has helped me out a lot.

    That and doing it fairly fast instead of at grandma pace.
    Last edited by Cassius; 10/10/2006 12:06am at .
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  4. Aesopian is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 12:02am

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    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I was actually going to make the analogy that this technique, when done right, has the same feel as doing the kamikaze calf crank from half guard. But then I realized that me and Eddie Bravo seem to the the two people in the universe who actually know how to do the kamizake right and I didn't see any added value in comparing this escape to a move no one can do.
  5. Cassius is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 12:07am

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Aesopian
    I was actually going to make the analogy that this technique, when done right, has the same feel as doing the kamikaze calf crank from half guard. But then I realized that me and Eddie Bravo seem to the the two people in the universe who actually know how to do the kamizake right and I didn't see any added value in comparing this escape to a move no one can do.
    Translation: If you can make the technique hurt, you'll probably regain half guard.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  6. GoldenJonas is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 12:13am

    Join us... or die
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Most important of all, despite being under side control, I have good posture. My arms are between his chest and mine, with my elbows in and my hands by my face. My left forearm is across his neck and my right hand is by my cheek, defending the crossface. My left elbow is inside his arm, since he will be trying to underhook it to lock down the position.

    Regardless of what escape I want to do, having correct posture is extremely important. If he's underhooking my arms or trapping them with his knees, I'll have trouble with any escape. If I'm spazzing out and hugging him or grabbing over his back or headlocking him, I'm just preventing myself from escaping. And I must have reverted back to being a gotarded white belt or something.

    If you take anything away from this, it should be the importance of proper posture. This escape and most others won't mean much without it.
    This is probably the best advise for all new guys and for guys, like me, who tend to focus too much on where I want to go instead of where I am at. The first thing I thought from picture one was "damn, that's a pretty shitty side control." But something has to give for the move to work making posture the most important variable.
  7. Pandinha is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 12:39am

    supporting memberhall of famestaff
     Style: Muay Thai & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The Devil is in the Details!

    Thanks Aeso!
  8. Cassius is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 1:07am

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by GoldenJonas
    The first thing I thought from picture one was "damn, that's a pretty shitty side control."
    Once again . . . sigh . . . this is just a demonstration of technique. You could go through any number of BJJ instructionals and point things like that out.

    It would be silly for Aesopian's demonstration partner to be trying to hold him down in side control while Aeso is taking pictures. One, it would make the pictures unclear. Two, it would take focus off the actual technique. Three, it's irrelevant, as this technique works quite well on non-shitty side control.

    Edit: On a productive note, here's a link to a mount escape that uses somewhat similar concepts.

    http://www.jenbjj.com/NewTechnique/Tech14a.html
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  9. JohnnyS is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 3:03am

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Here's a different side control escape that seems to work really well from the same posiiton:
    The knee that Aesopian has up should stay there.
    Aesopian bridges with his left foot.
    Aesopian now starts trying to turn towards his partner with his right knee.

    If Aeso lifts his hips up it will lift up his partners hips, as well as taking weight off Aeso's chest. By lifting up his partners hips with the bridge, it's easier to get the right knee underneath his partners hip and do his escape.
  10. OldDog53 is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 10:41am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I really appreciate the Stupid Simple Series. Especially the Stupid Simple Basics.

    You've gotta get Green Whale to come down and make a DVD.

    The resolution of the pix in some of the tutorials dropped. :-(
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