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  1. Sam Browning is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/09/2006 4:55pm

    hall of famestaff
     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Reviews of tapes and DVDs are always welcome.
  2. NoMan is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/09/2006 11:56pm


     Style: Boxing, Judo, BJJ, M.T.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Samuel Browning
    Reviews of tapes and DVDs are always welcome.
    Paul Vunak's Street Safe 3: Vol. 2.

    This is the review for the final portion of the Street Safe Series 3: Brutal Solutions.

    Part I: Actual Techniques Demonstrated and Advice Given

    The final segment of this tape focuses exclusively on biting w/ a minor segment on eyegouging as a complimentary dirty-fighting focus.

    The first thing that Vunak talks about is choke defenses. Vunak shows a BJJ escape from the rear mounted choke, with hooks in. He sticks one arm up, slides backward until his back touches the matt, then turns over into mount after escaping. This is without the first arm successfully pulling up on the neck.

    His next defense is to pretend that the first arm slipped underneath the neck. He reaches up and grabs the second hand which is placed on the attacker's shoulder. Still standard BJJ. He then introduces the bite technique. He says that you should not attempt to get a mouthful bite on this technique. He demonstrates it and shows that if the person pulls back while your mouth is open with his forearm in your mouth, it makes a very painful face crank. He then shows how to trap the arm and shoulder, and "nibble bite" the arm to prevent a face crank and make the other person want to let go of the rear mounted position.

    From here, the scene pans out and it's back to Vunak speaking about fighting, and he states that biting is more difficult than grappling or boxing.

    He next shows a scenario where he gets suckerpunched. Person A holds him down, while Person B runs up and starts kicking him and punching him. He flails about and gets beat. Fight two shows the same scenario, but the bite escape is added into the fray. Person A gets bit and kicked off. Person B gets Vunak's straight blast attack. His point is that it's important to know how to escape from a mounted position.

    His next demonstration is the basic mount. He shows that you should get a high ride in a mount to avoid getting bucked off with a bridge/upa. He continues with a ground-n-pound approach showing how to sit to create space for throwing punches. His next demonstration is to use the grapevine mount, which he states is superior for biting techniques, giving him free hands to attack with. He bites the guy and shows how if the opponent successfully escapes to a guard position, he can still bite the guy. He says it takes him 3 - 8 seconds to make the guy lose his emotional will to fight with the bite.

    His next move shows how to do a rear naked choke the jiu-jitsu way. He actually goes through the full technique and shows how to trap the defending arm with the legs and how to move the hips. He adds onto this the bite technique to help get the move cinched in whenever the opponent defends the choke successfully.

    Next, his opponent attempts to mount him and Vunak pulls guard. Vunak has actually used this move several times before in the series, he's simply never explained it. He starts off by showing various ways to break the posture on a fighter if he's in your guard. He then shows how to lock someone's head in a closed guard so that they cannot bite you, but you can bite them.

    He next discusses eyegouging, which he recommends training by wearing a pair of swim goggles that only cover the eyes and practicing eyegouging your partner. He says you should rake horizontally across the eyes to maximize damage.

    His final drill is to grapple half-speed and look for bites. Only one person looks for the bite, and the other taps when he feels the bite.

    He ends with a demonstration of a bites effects on a person by having them tie a piece of meat to their body and bite it. He then does the same drill solo. He stresses the need for practicing biting.

    Part II: My thoughts on his advice and what he demonstrated. The Griping.

    A.) Some of his escapes are highly dubious or sub-optimal. For example, when the opponent puts both arms in the chest while in guard, the standard jiu-jitsu response is to raise the guard up to the shoulders, cross the feet, cross-grab the hands, and break both arms. If this is "savage solutions", a double armbar is a more effective attack as breaking both arms is more lethal than biting someone.

    B.) His demonstration on raw meat is not very healthy as this can give you diseases resulting from raw meat.

    C.) He does not break down fundamental positions or defenses as well as he should.

    Random Gripes and Complaints:

    * The idea that biting is harder than grappling is humorous because at the end in the segment "putting it all together", he says that he has basically filled the principle of "teach a man to fish and he eats for a lifetime". Knowing these principles, he says, you can find any biting technique on your own, and that "it's not rocket science". He contradicts himself when he says that it's harder than boxing or grappling, as both sports take months to learn and many years to master, while he admits it doesn't take much to learn how to bite properly.

    * When he sees the choke he shrugs his shoulders up and dips his neck, as you should. However, he never tells this to the audience, thus robbing them of one of the easiest defenses from a rear mounted choke.

    Part III: The Good Stuff

    This is probably the most solid of his videos in the series. His advice is pretty sound, he does give good demonstrations for escapes, and he places biting within a wider context of martial art skills necessary.

    Part IV: Overall evaluation

    The overall evaluation for this tape and the series is this. Paul Vunak is apparently a skilled martial artist who has cross-trained many styles. Unfortunately, he takes it for granted that his viewing audience has also had the benefit of this training. He doesn't explain enough of the fundamental aspects of positional work and posturing to help anyone who doesn't already know how to wrestle. Since he never advocates learning how to wrestle properly, one is left with the impression he doesn't consider it important outside of "self-perfection" not for "self-defense".

    His advice is pretty solid for the most part. Against multiple attackers, you're screwed without a weapon. Look to run whenever you can. Biting and eyegouging don't work if you don't have positional superiority. Some of the stats he pulls out remind me of the joke that, "60% of statistics are made up on the spot, just like this one."

    Overall, this is one of the better RBSD films I've seen, and it reinforces my opinion about RBSD in general. It's no substitute for a good trainer. Much of what Vunak shows is worthless without the prerequisite knowledge of how to implement the techniques and when to use them. Vunak never states so, because that would obviously ruin the need for the videos and leave him w/o a source of income.

    The video series costs 70 dollars and lasts one hour and thirty minutes. You could spend your money better and buy Bas Rutten's "Lethal Streetfighting DVD" for only $44.95. Or, you could shell out a little more money and buy Bas Rutten's "Big DVDs of Combat" for $114.95, and learn how to kick, punch, trap, grapple, escape, and fight. Still no substitute for a good trainer, even though Bas Rutten is a God Among Men.

    I'd rate the series about a 5 out of 10. The listing of pros and cons overall:

    Production Quality, 8 out of 10: The audio and video is good, but the constant cuts, the words flashing on the screen, and the monochrome to color flashes looks like highschool special effects editing rather than professional supervision.

    Material Presented, 5 out of 10: The advice given is solid, but almost all of the more "meaty" advice given is worthless w/o proper training. But, when you get the proper training, you'll find there are more effective solutions to most of the problems presented.

    Cost to Value, 2 out of 10: For seventy bucks, you can get much better DVDs than this series to help you out. Mainly, most of the stuff shown here simply isn't very drillable. Paul does his best to show ways to drill it, but unless you also know someone who owns a bar and have friends who are willing to LARP with you, you cannot realistically drill most of this stuff.

    Overall: 15 out of 30.

    (* I've seen video series by Frank Shamrock, Mike Swain, Gustavo Dantas, Vladimer Vasiliev {Systema guy, unfortunately}, Paul Vunak, Mark Kerr, Dan Henderson, Randy Couture, and the Gracie Series. Bas Rutten's DVDs are the most applicable to "streetfighting", but not only that, Rutten is funny as hell to listen to and watch. Btw, watching all those videos hasn't helped that much with my game, it's just something I like to do.)
  3. Vulgar42Ox is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 3:56pm


     Style: BJJ, JKD

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i want to see paul vunak get beat up in the most stereotypical street fight in the front of a bar or something. just for irony's sake
  4. sempaiman is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 4:05pm


     Style: Mixed-Up Martial Arts

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Vulgar42Ox
    i want to see paul vunak get beat up in the most stereotypical street fight in the front of a bar or something. just for irony's sake
    I agree. Plus every picture I see of him, he always has his mouth wide open. In a real fight, he will get his jaw busted. :eusa_naug
  5. Sam Browning is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/10/2006 4:57pm

    hall of famestaff
     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Once again, a very good review. *applaudes*
  6. odd_lifter is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/13/2006 7:26pm


     Style: grab & elbow the head

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  7. Vulgar42Ox is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/13/2006 10:31pm


     Style: BJJ, JKD

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    street safe 9: judgement day
  8. Knave is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/13/2006 10:49pm


     Style: bjj

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    Greetings.

    Does he realize that while he's trying to bite the arm of the guy on his back, the guy on his back is elbowing his head into mush?
  9. odd_lifter is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/14/2006 10:24am


     Style: grab & elbow the head

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    i find it ironic a jeet kune do instructor writes a book called "anatomy of a street fight"
  10. unladylikedefns is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/10/2011 12:49pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Jeet Kune Do

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Paul Vunak is usually playing the bongos when there is a demo going on. All of his videos are great, especially The Enigma.
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