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  1. TGA-canetoad is offline

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    Oct 2005
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    Posted On:
    10/05/2006 8:02am


     Style: Was TKD->Kickboxing/ Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Pain in Feet During/After kickboxing sparring

    I was wondering if most of you with kickboxing experience get sore (like limping around for several days) feet. This is not my shins, they are fine, but if I roundhouse kick and someone moves out of range and blocks my leg on the top of my feet, after some time my feet tend to get hurt. I don't want to be injured so I am wondering if this is an issue probably with how my foot is positioned or a regular thing which goes away with experience.
    When sparring, I wear shin guards which have a section over the top of the feet, but these are quite soft and honestly I think the problem arises from my foot being stressed at the ankle (or bent, if you take my meaning) rather than through shock impacts. Do you think I should get better protective equipment, or just persevere? Thanks in advance
  2. PPlate is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/05/2006 8:41am


     Style: Muay Thai, Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have a similar problem. Like you said, when the person moves away and you hit him with the tip of your feet, it hurts the feet. Will like to hear what others have to say.
  3. WhiteShark is offline
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    1% Shark is better than you.

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    Posted On:
    10/05/2006 10:12am

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Are you wearing ankle supports?
  4. Draven is offline
    Draven's Avatar

    ('._.)

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    Posted On:
    10/05/2006 11:38am


     Style: Mixed Martial Arts

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Damn ***** noobs always making topics crying about their feets hurting, "waaahhh", if you cant handle it you can always take up Aikido.
  5. Kato is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/05/2006 12:55pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have occasionally caught a toe, stretching the tissues on the top of the foot...catching it again is painful..rest it and it will be right as rain. Or do as I do and dont follow my own advice and train through it.....
  6. TGA-canetoad is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/05/2006 7:05pm


     Style: Was TKD->Kickboxing/ Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    No I don't have ankle supports, and sorry draven, I'll make an effort not to be a ***** in future, just for you. And there's no fucking way I'm doing aikido.
  7. alex is offline
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    STOP POSTING!

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    Posted On:
    10/05/2006 7:14pm

    supporting member
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    basically, its called manning up. learn to aim is also a good option. watch pros fight or spar and they still crack their toes on peoples knees but they dont give a ****
  8. Torakaka is offline
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    Do you eat breakfast?

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    Posted On:
    10/05/2006 7:29pm

    supporting member
     Style: Kitty Pow Pow!!!

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Yeah, I don't recall having any foot ouchies after my first 3 months or so of sparring. Get better at working range and kicking people when you're close to jab range. You'll probably be used to cracking your feet on people during sparring after a while.
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  9. j416to is offline

    Middleweight

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    Posted On:
    10/05/2006 7:29pm

    supporting member
     Style: Muay Thai, Kenjutsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hurting your foot, or your shin, is probably a function of throwing a low roundhouse kick when you shouldn't have, more than anything else.

    If you're getting hurt this way it's probably because your opponent had enough time to see your low roundhouse kick coming, plant himself, and then blocked you, without losing any balance on their part. And you simply followed through with a low roundhouse kick that was hard enough to hurt your foot, or lower shin, when it hit your more solidly grounded opponent.

    Low roundhouse kicks are often best thrown when your opponent is already off balance, or when you're sure that your opponent isn't expecting it. If you're sparring at less than half speed you probably need to throw your low roundhouse kick at the end of a combination, because more than likely, the half speed sparring means that you've already give up the element of surprise.

    Furthermore, people that get hurt throwing a low roundhouse kick, while sparring at half speed, are often using their kicks like jabs. They might be a little hesitant to step up and punch someone, or get punched, so they're trying to lay back and throw a couple of kicks, from distances where they think that they're not going to get punched in the face. As a result their low kicks are blocked, easily, and they end up getting hurt.

    However, if your shins are well conditioned, because you've been kicking a heavy bag, consistently, several hrs a week, for the past couple of years, than you might be able to blast through your opponent's block, provided your kick is being thrown at speed that is fast enough to keep your opponent off balanced.

    But in the end, I think it's still better to throw your roundhouse kicks at the end of a combination of punches, where your opponent is more likely to be off balance.

    Hang in there.

    Good luck!
  10. PPlate is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/05/2006 8:59pm


     Style: Muay Thai, Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by j416to
    Hurting your foot, or your shin, is probably a function of throwing a low roundhouse kick when you shouldn't have, more than anything else.

    If you're getting hurt this way it's probably because your opponent had enough time to see your low roundhouse kick coming, plant himself, and then blocked you, without losing any balance on their part. And you simply followed through with a low roundhouse kick that was hard enough to hurt your foot, or lower shin, when it hit your more solidly grounded opponent.

    Low roundhouse kicks are often best thrown when your opponent is already off balance, or when you're sure that your opponent isn't expecting it. If you're sparring at less than half speed you probably need to throw your low roundhouse kick at the end of a combination, because more than likely, the half speed sparring means that you've already give up the element of surprise.

    Furthermore, people that get hurt throwing a low roundhouse kick, while sparring at half speed, are often using their kicks like jabs. They might be a little hesitant to step up and punch someone, or get punched, so they're trying to lay back and throw a couple of kicks, from distances where they think that they're not going to get punched in the face. As a result their low kicks are blocked, easily, and they end up getting hurt.

    However, if your shins are well conditioned, because you've been kicking a heavy bag, consistently, several hrs a week, for the past couple of years, than you might be able to blast through your opponent's block, provided your kick is being thrown at speed that is fast enough to keep your opponent off balanced.

    But in the end, I think it's still better to throw your roundhouse kicks at the end of a combination of punches, where your opponent is more likely to be off balance.

    Hang in there.

    Good luck!
    Great advice!
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