228388 Bullies, 4118 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 17
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. blackbrujo is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    96

    Posted On:
    10/02/2006 2:04am


     Style: Jiu Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Necessary Flexibility

    I'm about to start at a BJJ school soon and some advice on flexibility would help me a lot.
    I've read a little of Kurz' book on flexibility but am no expert by any standards. Basically, what kinds of flexibility are absolutely necessary and/or facilitate the techniques?
  2. fanatical is offline
    fanatical's Avatar

    Hi, guys

    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Oslo, Norway
    Posts
    1,291

    Posted On:
    10/02/2006 2:59am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The ones you get through regular training.
    More human than human is our motto.
  3. PoleFighter is offline

    Professional Swede

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    1,155

    Posted On:
    10/02/2006 8:48am


     Style: Sandbagged BJJ white belt

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Just do the stretches that you are shown regularly after every class and you'll be fine. I would say that the most important flexibility is the one in you waist, though, as it helps a lot in guardwork, especially when big guys decide to double you up and crush you.
    I pointed at him [the panhandler], bringing my rear hand up in a subtle approximation of the double Wu Sau guard that is the default hand position in Wing Chun Kung Fu.

    "Step away," I hissed.
    -Phil Elmore
  4. RoninPimp is offline
    RoninPimp's Avatar

    BJJ Black Belt

    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    1,141

    Posted On:
    10/02/2006 9:24am

    supporting member
     Style: Rex Kwon Do

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hip flexibility. The more the better.
  5. Blue Negation is offline

    Woke up in the mortuary

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    1,228

    Posted On:
    10/02/2006 9:31am


     Style: Judo, Sub wrestling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You may have heard of a man named BJ Penn, or have seen his recent match with one Matthew Hughes. Shoot for that.

    Just kidding. Do hip and spine stretches regularly - controlled splits, bridges & rollouts, that yoga hip stretch where you fold your leg in front of you and shoot your other leg straight back & lower yourself, stuff like that. You don't need that much, this isn't taekwondo.
  6. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    10/02/2006 11:09am

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You are going to get flexibility through your training... eventually. I really hate when people say that. It's like saying "squats and milk" to someone prone to a ACL injury.

    If you want to play it smart and avoid (or at least minimize) potential injures, I'd advise you concentrate on glute flexibility first, then hip flexibility and lastly on hamstring flexibility. You do those in that order (don't deviate from that!!!)

    One quick-n-easy test on hip, glutes AND hamstring flexibility is sit on the floor with your legs opened (more or less around a 45 degree angle, and grab one of you feet with the hand on the opposite side (.ie. right hand to left foot) WITH your hand pronated (thumbs down) around the outside of the foot. If you feel you are inflexible, DO IT SLOWLY AND WITHOUT FORCING YOUR BACK OR NECK FOR CHRIST'S SAKE. :biblethum

    Grabbing one of your feet that way requires a minimum of flexibility in the aforementioned areas (as opposed to grabbing one of your feet with the hand on the same side). If you can do that without much problem, I wouldn't worry if I were you.

    A quick, safe, tried-and-true way to get you up to speed is by doing the following stretches IN THE GIVEN ORDER after a light warmup (this is assuming you are inflexible enough to require that routine. If not, just disregard.)

    1. Do these in the order given: Glute stretch , Abductor Magnus stretches and Hip Flexor stretch.

    2. Then do this, this, this, and this for your hip aductors... so that you don't risk a groin pull.

    3. Then, do your regular hamstring stretch. Bend your knees if you need to. Again, the key is not to force your back. Specially, if you feel any pain on your shoulder blades, STOP.

    4. Lightly move your neck up and down, left and right. Do a few of those. Then, rotate your head clock and counterclock wise for a few sets. Then, move your chin down until it touches your chest. If you can't, don't force it - just hold the back of your neck and apply light pressure. Eventually you'll get it. NEVER FORCE IT.

    That set of stretches target parts in your body. Flexibility for everything else (neck, shoulders, upper and lower back, abdominals) depends on hamstring, glute and hip flexibility. Without that, everything else is a house made out of poker cards.

    Later you can try the following yoga poses (go easy and don't force them... specially if you feel any discomfort in your knees)... also in the given order, and only after you do the stretches mentioned above:

    1. Ardha Matsyendrasana (Half Lord of the Fishes Pose)

    2. Salabhasana (Locust Pose)

    3. My favorite, Pasasana (Noose Pose)

    LAST:

    This is a yoga pose I've been experimenting lately before and after doing neck push ups (front and back), Halasana (Plow Pose). I'd advise to be careful with it. However, this is a sure way to develop a flexible and strong neck.

    Hope it helps.

    ps... if you have access to a leg extension machine, use it, whore it. But do leg extensions with one leg only. That's the way to work your vastus medialis, the one muscle that keeps your kneecap in place. Squats and the like work your leg as a whole, but they don't do **** to remedy or prevent a muscular imbalance in the vastus medialis.
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  7. PoleFighter is offline

    Professional Swede

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Stockholm, Sweden
    Posts
    1,155

    Posted On:
    10/02/2006 11:38am


     Style: Sandbagged BJJ white belt

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Wow, great post, el macho.
    I pointed at him [the panhandler], bringing my rear hand up in a subtle approximation of the double Wu Sau guard that is the default hand position in Wing Chun Kung Fu.

    "Step away," I hissed.
    -Phil Elmore
  8. Yrkoon9 is offline
    Yrkoon9's Avatar

    Brock Sampson

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Land of the Living
    Posts
    4,590

    Posted On:
    10/02/2006 11:56am

    supporting member
     Style: 5.56

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Being able to touch the instep of your foot to your chest is excellent for replacing guard. Being able to put your foot behind your head allows you to replace your guard almost at will.
  9. OldDog53 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    San Carlos
    Posts
    253

    Posted On:
    10/02/2006 1:44pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by el macho
    ps... if you have access to a leg extension machine, use it, whore it. But do leg extensions with one leg only. That's the way to work your vastus medialis, the one muscle that keeps your kneecap in place. Squats and the like work your leg as a whole, but they don't do **** to remedy or prevent a muscular imbalance in the vastus medialis.
    El Macho, thank you very much for laying out a simple stretching program, especially with the links. I have been using some simple judo stretches and some old hatha yoga stretched in my own conditioning, but I like your "function specific" approach and printed out the links.

    If we DON'T have access to a leg extension machine, are there any substitutes?

    Also, I had one leg torqued sideways in a leg applied leg lock, now I have a lower range of movement in that leg - the knee is a lot higher in the seated glute stretch on one side than the other. Any suggestions?
  10. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    10/02/2006 2:40pm

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by OldDog53
    El Macho, thank you very much for laying out a simple stretching program, especially with the links. I have been using some simple judo stretches and some old hatha yoga stretched in my own conditioning, but I like your "function specific" approach and printed out the links.
    Anytime. Yrkoon's suggestion is also a good one - I don't think the stretch performed by that movement (bringing your foot towards your chest) wasn't include in the list. You should give it a try.

    That list is mostly what I had to go through to regain flexibility - I had a severe problem with my hamstrings and lower back about 2 years ago. I couldn't touch my shins with my hands, that's how bad it was. My sister (she is a PT) put me on that routine, plus my g/f at the time was a yoga practitioner who also helped me correct my problems.

    I still have a bit of a problem with my right leg. When I do squats, my right leg tends to shift out (or my left shoulder drops). It takes a lot of concentration to avoid either.

    Another exercise I completely forgot to mention is Balasana (Child's Pose) - I think it's called "the turtle pose" in other forms of yoga, but it's the same. It can be done right after the first pose I suggested. I do this every morning. The goal is to keep:

    1. your glutes touching the back of your ankles
    2. your forehead on the floor
    3. both of your elbows touching floor if possible.

    This will stretch your glutes, neck and will open up your entire back.

    Quote Originally Posted by OldDog53
    If we DON'T have access to a leg extension machine, are there any substitutes?

    Also, I had one leg torqued sideways in a leg applied leg lock, now I have a lower range of movement in that leg - the knee is a lot higher in the seated glute stretch on one side than the other. Any suggestions?
    Hmmm, in that case, I will strongly suggest NOT to use a leg extension machine at all unless you use a very light weight and high volume (reps).

    Alternatives to leg extensions to strenghten the vastus medialis involve duck walks and lunges. However, in your case, use light weight and high volume. Treat it as if you are recovering from an accident (which you are for all practical purposes.)

    Other people here have had similar sparring accidents, so they may be better able to explain their recovery process.

    For you, IMO, it will better to do lots of reps of squats (bodyweight, not barbell)... LOTS. Massage your knees and apply heat pads as well.

    As for stretching the quads, just be careful. Just do astandard, plain-vanella sitting possition or a standing quad stretch - use towel stretches if your quads are too inflexible or if your knees are giving you problems.

    What I do (stretching my left quads as an example) is that I bring my left instep onto something, like a couch, then flex my right leg until the left knee knee points directly downwards. Then, I begin to bend my back backwards. That's the quad stretch from hell.

    The position of your knee seems like standard hip inflexibility stuff. The stretches I mentioned should help.

    There is another hip/femur rotation exercise that I know of. You may want to try it at the end of your stretching routine... BUT USE CAUTION AND COMMON SENSE. This exercise should never, ever, ever involve any deep pain in the knee. If that occurs stop.

    1. Lay on the floor, flat on your back, legs together, heels of the feet touching
    2. While keeping the heels together, rotate both feet outward as if you were trying to touch the floor with your pinky toes. Go as far as you safely can.

    3. While still flat on the floor, flex your left foot and plant it next to your right knee.
    4. From there, move your left foot to the left. Imagine your right quadriceps point 12'oclock while your left quads point 10'oclock.
    5. Without putting any pressure on your left knee, begin to twist your quads inwards bringing your left knee as close as possible to the floor. Stop if you experience any acute distorsion. (repeat with your right leg.)

    NOTE: this movement is not done by moving your knee down, but by twisting your quads - imagine you are rotating your femur. Never apply pressure on your knee. You won't get this overnight. It will take diligent work. This exercise can make a lot of corrections in your hips.

    There is another advanced pose, Garudasana (Eagle Pose). Forget the arm twisting in the pose for a second. When you are fully warmed up, get in front of a wall, and by putting both hands in the wall, try twisting your legs as in the pose. You can gently help your legs into position by first bending your knees and then using your hands to bring the leg into position... again... GENTLY :biblethum
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.