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  1. #31
    Cassius's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by G8
    inasmuch as you're using the mount demo as a de facto sales pitch, maybe it'd be a good idea to employ someone a bit more advanced than a blue or experienced white, particularly if the new guy is large or athletic. Rorion I'm sure can hold the mount against damn near anyone who comes through the door, but the illustration would lose a lot of its impact if your top guy were to get bucked off.
    If you were to read the entire thread, you would find that de Lima has been doing this for years, so apparently it isn't that bad.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal

  2. #32

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    me read whole thread? that hard, make head tired.

  3. #33

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I love your idea of starting out new guys on Reverse omoplatas and the crucifix Aesopian. For all that is sacred in this world, you should do this as an experiment, and watch his development closely to see if it makes a difference. If you did this, I think I would have to send you $50 bucks in the mail for being so awesome.

  4. #34
    Bustardo's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    At my very first class we did something very similar. I wasn't taught any submissions at all, but learned a lot of positioning.

    Being a BJJ noob it's good to know that I'm doing things that are fairly standard.

  5. #35
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Are you going to really ingrain "Position before Submission"?

  6. #36

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    Are most BJJ schools taught like this? The school I just started at does seem to have alot of structure. Just seems like the guy throws some things out there and your kinda at the mercy of your training partner to give you the fine details. seems very hard for me to feel like i am doing anything but crappling. I really like the "SBGi Coaching model" and I learned more in 15mins reading your post then I have in 5 weeks I have been doing BJJ

  7. #37
    Cassius's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by fitz31
    Are most BJJ schools taught like this? The school I just started at does seem to have alot of structure. Just seems like the guy throws some things out there and your kinda at the mercy of your training partner to give you the fine details. seems very hard for me to feel like i am doing anything but crappling. I really like the "SBGi Coaching model" and I learned more in 15mins reading your post then I have in 5 weeks I have been doing BJJ
    Depends on the instructor. Very few that I've encountered are this organized. My old school had beginners' nights for newbies to combat this sensation of jumping headfirst into a new sport. Old hands were welcome to come, but were more there to help teach and refine techniques (and get some roll time in) than they were to learn.

    Some instructors just start tossing things against the wall, hoping some of it will stick.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal

  8. #38
    UpaLumpa's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Garbanzo Bean
    Depends on the instructor. Very few that I've encountered are this organized. My old school had beginners' nights for newbies to combat this sensation of jumping headfirst into a new sport. Old hands were welcome to come, but were more there to help teach and refine techniques (and get some roll time in) than they were to learn.

    Some instructors just start tossing things against the wall, hoping some of it will stick.
    That's how things are run at my school as well. There is a "fundamentals" class that reviews a basic syllabus of things but normal classes are more eclectic (usually focusing on one area, e.g. gi chokes, for a week) without a lot of the formal background.

    My instructor only recently started teaching full time and I think the pattern of classes is a carry-over from when he learned by doing a private once a month and then driving back to red neck central to teach his buddies.

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