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  1. #11

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
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    Indiana
    Posts
    2,147
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I find it distrubing that you commented your club doesnt' focus on basics now that there are blue belts. Our club has purples and blues and we still spend a TON of time on basics. Position drills, armbar drills, triangle drills, sweeps, etc. Sure it is boring as hell, but you get though it and keep your basics sharp and fresh. It's usually the blue and purple belts who are enjoying it the most. All of us white belts want to learn something 'cool'.

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    San Carlos
    Posts
    253
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by FictionPimp
    I find it distrubing that you commented your club doesnt' focus on basics now that there are blue belts. Our club has purples and blues and we still spend a TON of time on basics. Position drills, armbar drills, triangle drills, sweeps, etc. Sure it is boring as hell, but you get though it and keep your basics sharp and fresh. It's usually the blue and purple belts who are enjoying it the most. All of us white belts want to learn something 'cool'.
    Good point, well taken. I haven't been there long enough to see a definite/consistent pattern, but so far there seems to be a lot of conditioning (up to 30 minutes), some drilling, and a lot of either rolling from a fixed start position, or rolling from knees. When there is drilling, it tends to start with one position and one move from that position, then some variants of that move.

    Keep in mind that I am only going to one class a week right now, the busiest class, and there are about 9 other classes during the week (lunchtime, after work, evening) so for someone making all classes there probably is a lot of drilling, cumulatively, during the wek.

    What I hope to get from the DVD's is an overview of the "most important skills" because right now it's going to take a long time, at one class per week, before I hit all the basics.

    Of course in class they go into a lot more depth than I saw so far on the sampler DVD on any particular technique - variants, alternatives, counters - but I want to start out with at least a basic understanding of body position and basic moves so I have something to build on, and don't struggle to understand what's going on.

    For example, in one class they taught escapes from knee on stomach, and they weren't too hard to follow, but in another class they taught how to reverse someone attacking your back while you were in turtle, and it was so hard to me to follow I had trouble even drilling it.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    616
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by OldDog53
    What I hope to get from the DVD's is an overview of the "most important skills" because right now it's going to take a long time, at one class per week, before I hit all the basics.

    Of course in class they go into a lot more depth than I saw so far on the sampler DVD on any particular technique - variants, alternatives, counters - but I want to start out with at least a basic understanding of body position and basic moves so I have something to build on, and don't struggle to understand what's going on.

    For example, in one class they taught escapes from knee on stomach, and they weren't too hard to follow, but in another class they taught how to reverse someone attacking your back while you were in turtle, and it was so hard to me to follow I had trouble even drilling it.
    finding complex technique confusing at first is just part of the process, at least at most BJJ schools. you're not necessarily expected to absorb it fully the first time you see it (or even the second or third, sometimes)--but eventually you'll get the hang of it. training more than once a week will make a big difference in your progress; if you can fit in even one more class a week, I'd strongly recommend it. keeping a training log & recording the details of each technique while it's still fresh in your mind can also be a big help.

    I haven't seen Simco's DVDs, but given his shady rep, I have a hard time imagining they're any good. I can vouch for Roy Harris' BJJ 101 series; he's the real thing, and if you buy from him you won't be supporting a fraud.

    http://www.royharris.biz/catalog/c1_p1.html

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
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    San Carlos
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by G8
    [part of quote omitted].... I can vouch for Roy Harris' BJJ 101 series; he's the real thing, and if you buy from him you won't be supporting a fraud.

    http://www.royharris.biz/catalog/c1_p1.html
    I just ordered his new BJJ Over 40 DVD. It sounds like just what the doctor ordered. One of his stated goals is to teach us (the old but roll minority) how to reduce the number and fequency of injuries so we can take more classes. Sounds good to me. :5yeah:

    My biggest problem with age in not strength or cardio (I almost have those where I need them). It's healing rate.

  5. #15

    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Posts
    616
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    BJJ Over 40 is mostly focused on ways to conserve energy while rolling. It's well worth the $$ IMO.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    San Carlos
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    253
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by G8
    BJJ Over 40 is mostly focused on ways to conserve energy while rolling. It's well worth the $$ IMO.
    Getting winded is still a major problem for me when rolling. (LOL - big surprise.) So learning to conserve energy, without dogging it, will be interesting to see.

    I didn't pay much attention to BJJ 101 on the Harris site you linked, since it appeared to be available only on tape and I don't even have a VCR hooked up anymore. But then I went back to the website after your post , noticed it is available in DVD (my bad), and looked at the curriculum:

    This 90 min. instructional features a step-by-step introduction to the most critical skill in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu…positional escapes. If you're new to Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, this instructional offers you an excellent way to fast track your ground game. More advanced players will appreciate the detailed analysis of the principles, guidelines and formulas which are the basis for all positional escapes in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

    The training is presented by internationally renowned instructor and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu expert Roy Harris. Roy's patented instructional format, plain English and easy to follow style will have you achieving new levels of performance faster than you ever thought possible.

    The focus of this instructional is on learning the principles, formulas and key techniques that form the core of all positional escapes in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu!

    You'll learn:
    • Escapes from the mount
    • Passing the guard
    • Escaping the side mount
    • Escaping the headlock
    • Escaping the scarf hold
    • Escaping the wrestler's cradle
    Plus:
    • Escape combinations - the ultimate key to success
    • Partner drills - train correctly
    • Exclusive fight footage - see it in action!



    This sounds just like what the doctor ordered; not only from the standpoint of instructional videos, but also it answers my other post on escapes.


    (But now I'll have to wait until next paycheck....)



  7. #17
    UpaLumpa's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Descending into absurdity
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    6,977
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It is unlikely Simco can teach a proper upa.

  8. #18

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    137
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The better you get at BJJ, the worse you will realize Simco is.

    His materials are jam-packed with mistakes.

    He is a fraud on every level.

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