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  1. NoMan is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    LSU
    Posts
    396

    Posted On:
    8/30/2006 8:00pm


     Style: Boxing, Judo, BJJ, M.T.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Unique Drills

    I have a few drills that I have boxers do that most people have told me are unique. I was wondering if anyone else had unique drills that they hadn't seen elsewhere.

    Heavy bag for uppercuts:

    I found that most boxers prefer the heavy bag, but uppercutting a heavybag can be dangerous unless it's a specially designed bag like the angle bag or an uppercut bag. So, I had one boxer grab the bottom of the bag and pull it upward so that the bag angles on its own. The second boxer would perform a rear uppercut/lead hook combo on it w/ the head to the left, (in the case of an orthodox stance), and then switch his head over to the right whenever working the lead uppercut/rear hook. (*) Works very well and will quickly tire whoever is doing the drill. Thus, I usually make it an interval drill and switch off who holds the bag.

    The rear hook comes alive:

    The classic response against a boxer who paws (**) at his opponent is to use the overhand right to come over the top of the glove to hit the opponent. The problem is that this punch doesn't work well against opponents who have more reach, and it comes from an angle that people expect. The solution that I've found for a person who paws with the lead hand is the 'shuffle hook'.

    I have boxers take a step to the right and throw the rear hook, bypassing the hand that is left out. Then quickly step back. (***) I've seen amateur boxers get popped by this same punch four times in a round.

    Finding your range:

    Some boxers never seem to learn the proper ranges for throwing punches. To compensate, I made a drill involving duct tape. I discovered this one accidentally because the only thing I had from the army originally for the boxing room was a bunch of mats that were excess from the weight room. I tied them together with duct tape so they wouldn't slide on the floor.

    I made the duct tape into a triangle shape that roughly corresponded to the range that my boxer w/o distance would throw punches from. I then broke it down into the outside range and the inside range. The boxer would step up to the outside line and throw jab/cross from there. If he took a step forward, he would be on the inside range and throw hook/uppercut. (Shadow uppercuts due to the danger of hitting the wrist wrong.) If the boxer was inside that range, he would have to use short rhythm, (head movement side to side) and step back. If the boxer went outside of the outside range, long rhythm, (head movement front to back) until he was within range.

    I found out this one wasn't that unique, some coaches use chalk to simulate those lines. :cwm10: So, most people don't know that drill.

    (* Most boxers get whiny here and say, "but I never throw the rear hook in a fight. That's the next drill.)

    (** Pawing is a boxing term for someone who reaches out to catch opponent's hands, or generally keeps his/her hands away from the face.)

    (*** Normally, you would drag the left foot backwards and pivot on the right foot to catch the opponent at an angle. In this case, doing that would detract from the power of the punch since the primary purpose of the punch is to hit the opponent with the hands out, not to create an angle.)
  2. Whispers is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    54

    Posted On:
    9/14/2006 9:26pm


     Style: Judo, Tae Kwon Do, Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm not sure if this is unique, but to train power with my front leg front kick and working on using it to keep people away, My instructor taught me to get a heavy bag swinging back and forth at me and to hit it with my front leg technique as it was coming at me hard enough to send it moving back. When You get good enough to make it swing back with alot fo force, upgrade to a heavier bag.
  3. saku39 is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Tokyo/Atlanta
    Posts
    232

    Posted On:
    9/15/2006 12:02am


     Style: taido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    well written post. But, I dont quite get the triangle routine. Can you post a simple sketch or picture. Baring that, just trying explaining it again. I apologize, im not too good with words right now, all math at georgia tech.
  4. NoMan is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    LSU
    Posts
    396

    Posted On:
    9/15/2006 6:14am


     Style: Boxing, Judo, BJJ, M.T.

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Not a problem, I'll post a few pictures of it. Boxing doesn't start back up 'til Monday though, so you'll wait a bit before you get the pics.
  5. Ecks is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Location
    Places.
    Posts
    336

    Posted On:
    9/15/2006 9:53pm


     Style: Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Whispers
    I'm not sure if this is unique, but to train power with my front leg front kick and working on using it to keep people away, My instructor taught me to get a heavy bag swinging back and forth at me and to hit it with my front leg technique as it was coming at me hard enough to send it moving back. When You get good enough to make it swing back with alot fo force, upgrade to a heavier bag.
    That could be easily simulated using a resisting partner and a stomach pad.
  6. Whispers is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    54

    Posted On:
    9/16/2006 8:28am


     Style: Judo, Tae Kwon Do, Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ecks
    That could be easily simulated using a resisting partner and a stomach pad.
    I agree, but a partner isn't always available.

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