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  1. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Robot Jesus
    Yes, exactly. What specifically does he like about his kung fu compared to other arts? Or is it just what he started with and their where no serious problems? Would he suggest cross training and if so what would one learn?

    Same question to other CMA artists.

    The generalities of how kung fu can be good have been done to death, but what they have to offer tend to drown in a sea of chi flavored ****.

    And I tried to use the search function but after five pages I gave up

    You should ask Omega that, I just posted that because I know Omega lists his style as Kung-Fu. PM him or something.

  2. #12

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    Don't ask Omega about his kung-fu styles. It doesn't mean anything. What it is was the people I surrounded myself with. Funny story two of my Sifu's came in yesterday to check up how I was. My sifus/sihungs, were always cross training with kickboxers, Judokas, wrestlers etc. They just passed that philosophy on to me. My current kung-fu style is mine alone. It has it's base in Hung-gar, Five Ancestors/Five Fist, Southern Eagle Claw, and Leopard fist. But along with that I trained with Aikidoka, Kickboxers both muay thai and full contact, kenpo karate, boxers, and Judoka. This was in my teenage years. By the time UFC rolled around I had already encountered GJJ, shootfighting/shootwrestling, and SAMBO.


    The only thing that is grounded in tradition for me in kung-fu is work ethic, philosophy and etiquette. I can do all the forms, I can do the weapons but we spar, and we spar hard. All my students learn to spar boxing (poorly, I suck at boxing), san shou, throwing, and ground work. They learn self-defense techniques as idea based techniques. These techniques come from law enforcement, military, body guards, bouncers etc. They learn foo foo weapons Chinese broad sword, spear, long blade, but then they've got to learn to use real practical weapons, sticks, staffs, knives and swords.

    Our motto?

    'Did it work? (Then STFU)'

  3. #13

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    BTW my first blackbelt was in Judo.

  4. #14
    Don Gwinn's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    So, for Omega, the value in Kung Fu was its forward-thinking, progressive, and inclusive training philosophy. Who'da thunk it?
    *********************************************

  5. #15

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    The real Kung-fu?

  6. #16
    Cullion's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I dunno why everybody listens to Omega so much. He's just a JKD instructor who's bitter he doesn't have Bruce Lee's movie contacts.
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  7. #17
    Cullion's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ah well, seriously, if this thread is about the best that CMA has to offer..

    A lot of them have striking, throws and standing locks in their catalogue. If you can find a good school you can spar using a wider range of standup techniques than you might find in a straightforward kickboxing class. Some of the drills and conditioning used to develop this stuff in a free-fighting context look weird, but I've seen some people who have got impressive results from them.
    I'm sure there's more too it than that, but those are the main things I've seen so far.
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  8. #18
    Matt Stone's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't post much anymore, choosing instead to find ways to spend that same time training (a much better, more rewarding endeavor).

    I've been with my teacher and my seniors since 1985. I agree with Omega that "th3 r3al kung fu" is defined by its adherence to the basics - practice, practice, practice, and be sure it damn well works. Anything else is, well, crap.

    My teacher's background is extremely varied. He studied Judo, Kyokushin, and Shito-ryu long before he ever started in Chinese arts. After studying under his teacher, and achieving instructor status in the arts he learned from him, he continued his martial education, becoming certified as a JKD chapter leader, a Pekiti-Tirsia instructor, and learning smatterings of other arts as well (not so much because he wanted to "add" anything, but because he just wanted to learn them for the fun of it).

    I've trained in Yiliquan as my sole base art. But I've also studied two karate styles (both in Japan), some arnis, some judo, some boxing, and I continue to seek out training that interests me... Again, not to "add" necessarily, but to see my base training through different eyes in order to better my understanding. It used to be a requirement in our school years ago that before you could make the equivalent of 3rd degree black belt you had to have at least a black belt level in some other art...

    The "r3al" kung fu is like this... Hell, if you believe even half the bullshit myths about Shaolin's impact on martial arts in China, you are smacked in the face with a brick of history showing that every last government fleeing bastard that holed up at the temple cross-trained with every other refugee hiding out there... That's why all the so-called Shaolin arts look so much alike but have 100s of different "styles." Traditional Japanese and Okinawan arts are the same, too... Different teachers would deliberately send their students to train with other teachers to learn other techniques. The cross-training idea is an old one, and is only forgotten by shitty teachers...

    But whatever.

    :offtheair
    Last edited by Matt Stone; 7/30/2006 3:31pm at .

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Stone
    I don't post much anymore, choosing instead to find ways to spend that same time training (a much better, more rewarding endeavor).

    I've been with my teacher and my seniors since 1985. I agree with Omega that "th3 r3al kung fu" is defined by its adherence to the basics - practice, practice, practice, and be sure it damn well works. Anything else is, well, crap.

    My teacher's background is extremely varied. He studied Judo, Kyokushin, and Shito-ryu long before he ever started in Chinese arts. After studying under his teacher, and achieving instructor status in the arts he learned from him, he continued his martial education, becoming certified as a JKD chapter leader, a Pekiti-Tirsia instructor, and learning smatterings of other arts as well (not so much because he wanted to "add" anything, but because he just wanted to learn them for the fun of it).

    I've trained in Yiliquan as my sole base art. But I've also studied two karate styles (both in Japan), some arnis, some judo, some boxing, and I continue to seek out training that interests me... Again, not to "add" necessarily, but to see my base training through different eyes in order to better my understanding. It used to be a requirement in our school years ago that before you could make the equivalent of 3rd degree black belt you had to have at least a black belt level in some other art...

    The "r3al" kung fu is like this... Hell, if you believe even half the bullshit myths about Shaolin's impact on martial arts in China, you are smacked in the face with a brick of history showing that every last government fleeing bastard that holed up at the temple cross-trained with every other refugee hiding out there... That's why all the so-called Shaolin arts look so much alike but have 100s of different "styles." Traditional Japanese and Okinawan arts are the same, too... Different teachers would deliberately send their students to train with other teachers to learn other techniques. The cross-training idea is an old one, and is only forgotten by shitty teachers...

    But whatever.

    :offtheair

    Yup....

  10. #20

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Two words: Dim Mak

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