224714 Bullies, 3948 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 5 of 5
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. patfromlogan is offline
    patfromlogan's Avatar

    Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hilo Island of Hawaii
    Posts
    8,850

    Posted On:
    7/24/2006 11:46pm

    supporting member
     Style: Kyokushinkai / Kajukenbo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Henry Okazaki in challenge match.

    The Danzan Ryu thread (http://www.bullshido.net/forums/showthread.php?t=10924) got me looking for the picture of Henry Okazaki giving FDR a massage that had dissapeared and I found this info about old Henry getting into a fight. The style may not be known for hard sparring/live training these days, but it sounds like it may have gone the all- too-familiar bs way through the years.

    From http://www.highsierrajujitsu.com/history/

    The years in Hilo were busy ones. Jujitsu workouts with Tanaka-sensei were daily. When he wasn't at Shinyu-Kai, he was working. He tried a number of different jobs but Jui-Jitsu was his life. As he learned Yoshin-ryu from Tanaka-sensei he began to study other forms as well. He studied Hawaiian Lua, Okinawan karate, Philippine knife play and, from Master Wo Chong, Kung Fu. However, his main proficiency was in Yoshin-ryu, the style taught by Tanaka-sensei.

    The recovery of his health and his expertise in Yoshin-ryu made Okazaki a bit cocky. In the early twenties, he began going around the island, fighting exhibition bouts where and when he could find takers. His greatest moments came in May of 1922. In April of that year, a friend of Okazaki's, a martial artist named "Speed" Takahashi challenged a boxer, named Carl "Kayo" Morris to a bout. It was to be a confrontation between a boxer and a Jujitsu expert. Takahashi was fast and extremely proficient, but he wore glasses and couldn't see well without them. Morris took advantage of his handicap and knocked Takahashi out in the first round.

    Okazaki immediately challenged Morris to a bout. For the next month and a half, he trained. He watched other boxers to try to find weaknesses. A friend who worked at the Chevrolet dealership suggested that he should try to stay very low, out of the reach of Morris' punches. He used this advice. On May 19, 1922 the two men met. The fight was scheduled for six, three-minute rounds. It lasted only two. In the first round, Okazaki stalked his man, staying down in a low crouch. Theory is always less hazardous than practice. Okazaki misjudged both Morris' reach and power and had his nose broken halfway through the first round.

    In the next round, Okazaki watched for an opening. Morris, who had been jabbing, keeping Okazaki away, left his arm out a bit too long. Okazaki moved, driving under the boxer's arm and throwing the man. The throw and the fall injured Morris' arm and he was unable to continue. Okazaki's fame was immediate and the newspapers carried the story all the way back to Japan.




    The Hilo Daily Tribune, while not lavish with its praise, was nonetheless enthusiastic. The story made the front page of the Saturday morning edition with the headlines, "Morris Has No Chance Against Jujitsu Expert":

    "Five minutes after the start of the mixed bout and during which time Okazaki threw Morris and himself over the ropes into the audience upon two occasions. (sic) Okazaki threw his opponent to the mat and with an arm lock which wrenched the muscles of Morris' right arm and forced him to (figuratively speaking) throw up the sponge.

    At first sight, it looked as if Morris' arm was broken, but after an examination by Dr. S. R. Brown, who was present in the audience, it was found that the muscles were merely badly wrenched. "

    After the bout, Okazaki is supposed to have visited Morris in the hospital and massaged the boxer's arm, and the two are even said to have become friends. Whatever the epitaph to the bout, the win must have certainly bolstered Okazaki's already healthy ego.

    --------------------------------------------
    Old style training:
    Last edited by patfromlogan; 7/24/2006 11:56pm at .
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez
  2. WhiteShark is offline
    WhiteShark's Avatar

    1% Shark is better than you.

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Atlanta GA
    Posts
    9,179

    Posted On:
    7/25/2006 3:50pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: BJJ/Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What are they doing to his neck?
  3. patfromlogan is offline
    patfromlogan's Avatar

    Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hilo Island of Hawaii
    Posts
    8,850

    Posted On:
    8/02/2006 11:43am

    supporting member
     Style: Kyokushinkai / Kajukenbo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Who knows? Choke defense? Some obscure toughening I'd imagine.
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez
  4. CanucKyokushin is offline

    He'll flip ya!

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    ?????????
    Posts
    2,736

    Posted On:
    8/02/2006 12:06pm

    supporting member
     Style: Not.....working

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The man has an interesting history.But I read a lot of 'too deadly' in that.How much of it is true you imagine?

    Do you know if this Morris guy really existed and was a pro-boxer?
  5. patfromlogan is offline
    patfromlogan's Avatar

    Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Location
    Hilo Island of Hawaii
    Posts
    8,850

    Posted On:
    10/09/2006 10:37am

    supporting member
     Style: Kyokushinkai / Kajukenbo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think it's all true. I just found this: http://www.e-budo.com/forum/showthread.php?t=1075 that gets into more details and note that the Hilo paper said, "This paper is of the opinion that a mixed match ... between a Japanese jiu jitsu expert and a white boxer is not a good thing for this community. It serves no good purpose and merely arouses useless race prejudices. A Japanese and a white man could box together and no hard feeling would arise. If the Japanese won, even the white fans would credit him with being good to win in a game that is practically new to the Japanese, and if he lost, the Japanese would not suffer any hurt of pride. The same would be both true of a jiu jitsu match. But on the other hand, jiu jitsu is something that the Japanese think undefeatable, while the Anglo-Saxon thinks the same of boxing, and both methods are practically rooted in each classes's national pride. When either meets defeat at the other's hands, age-old pride of caste and country is aroused and good sportsmanship is bound to suffer."
    "Preparing mentally, the most important thing is, if you aren't doing it for the love of it, then don't do it." - Benny Urquidez

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.