221942 Bullies, 4151 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 21 to 30 of 63
Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 123 4567 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Punisher is offline
    Punisher's Avatar

    Seeker of Truth

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    2,943

    Posted On:
    7/11/2003 9:45pm

    supporting member
     Style: Five Animal Fighting

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "How'bout "CIMA" or "ICMA"?"

    I still don't know what they are. I really don't know what makes an art "internal" or "external".

    And gong sau and Fisting Kittens,

    Maybe I can't think "outside the box either" but, when you are kicking with the one leg you have 100% weight on your other. There has to be some weight transfer.

    Just because you are efficent at weight transfer, doesn't mean it doesn't happen.

    You can't tell me the master in FK's story started with 85% of his weight on his front foot and kicked keeping only 15% of his weight on his support leg with magical ki engergy shouldering the rest.



    <marquee>Dragon , Snake , Tiger , Leopard , Crane. R.M.F.A.F.T.A.T.! </marquee>
  2. IndoChinese is offline

    AKAKTK

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    angola, ny
    Posts
    2,047

    Posted On:
    7/11/2003 10:27pm


     Style: Liu Seong Gung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "You can't tell me the master in FK's story started with 85% of his weight on his front foot and kicked keeping only 15% of his weight on his support leg with magical ki engergy shouldering the rest."

    strong legs, fast kick: pop and reset.

    gongsau is most correct.

    "Trying to define a specific weighting in which one should fight is moronic. Defining weighting according to the desired result, taking into account the technique being performed is the only thing that makes sense, and it is generally more complex than anything that can be defined in a single post."

    Big Rod,

    "Wrong answer. You may not start off with your body weight on the back leg, but in order to pick up that front leg and get in the air, your weight MUST be transfered to you back (supporting) leg."

    in addition to involving a delay because of the weight shifting, which will of course delay the kick, this method described here is not advisable. to throw this kick, you shift your weight BACK to kick FORWARD, this means your hips and c.o.g. is moving backwards as you kick forward. this will have a few disadvantages.

    So, you are moving away from your target. this increases distance which decreases speed.(your kick has to travel farther to make impact, due to your rearward weight shift) normally increased working distance increases power, but unfortunately, moving the hips back removes any potential power increase because your are splitting your power vectors( the whole body is supposed to move together and down the same line....striking forward? then all movement is forward, no part of the body moves backwards in any way)

    you could manage to stop moving backwards then kick, but this doesnt involve whole body momentum in the kick, thus it is going to be weaker. since you moved back to initiate, you need a strong kick to stop your opponent from advancing on your retreat. if he moves in quickly, you could be caught moving back, before you can 'settle'. essentially you could be overrun.

    Jamoke,

    various 'stances' exist as focal points in a pattern of movement.

    if i had to specify, for whatever reason it goes like this (basically)

    seventy thirty weight distribution(basic running/front posture), oblique facing( one shoulder to enemy), no leg on centerline( lotta guys put one leg forward on the centerline, this is asking for trouble, like horse stance fighters who put that leg out front), stepping and engagement pattern is angular(circular) until a 'gate' is opened, the very direct and linear attacks(like bagua+hsingyi: bow and arrow theory)

    hands-one high and one low, guarding the centerline. always change together to maintain center guard. yang sides out, cover all organs.

    waiting and reading is used, as well as continuous movement to initiate. when still, dont even blink, when moving,never stop.


    the dynamics of stepping and movement is incredibly hard to define or categorize, because it is a 'moving' event. any description is essentially static and must fall short.

    take 50/50 for instance. it can good or bad, it all depends on the circumstance.

    in any event, bad 50/50 is the type of 'stance' in which it is difficult or slow to move from(or through). this is called double weighting.

    good 50/50 movement is very mobile, yet has the leverage strength called for at that time. this is called single weighting.

    the abililty to generate a 'moving root' is paramount.

    peace.

    <marquee>REDANTKUNTAO</marquee>
    <marquee> INDONESIAN GUNG FU</marquee>
  3. gong sau is offline

    Welterweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    The Great White North
    Posts
    699

    Posted On:
    7/11/2003 10:33pm

    supporting member
     Style: Brazillian Kung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Not "mystical ki energy," timing. I'm not talking about holding your front leg out while keeping only 15% of your weight on the rear leg, so don't give me that crap. In practice that 85% (or a large part of) is going into the target. It is not on your rear leg. Where do you think the power in a falling step comes from? If all of your weight were on the back leg, then you'd be kicking with nothing but leg. What do you think people mean when they talk about putting more body behind a technique? The main problem here is that you guys seem to be thinking in static terms, which do not exist in a fight. Try thinking about where your COG is (and where it's going).

    Besides that, it is possible to do the same thing statically, it just won't have much power at all.


    Flame on.
    -----------------------------------------------------
    "The difference between us, and other martial arts websites you might be looking for, is that we're not going to feed you, well, bullshit about martial arts."
    -Phrost
  4. Dr_Santo is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    East
    Posts
    81

    Posted On:
    7/12/2003 1:57am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What gong sau and the kittens means, i think, is that "Leaning back to kick, so you can put all the weight in your back leg is wrong". In that i agree.
    Where did that weight go? to your front kick. Because if you that weight well, you can produce a powerful kick. Of course some weight goes to the back leg, but you must avoid leaning back.

    or not?
  5. Punisher is offline
    Punisher's Avatar

    Seeker of Truth

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Location
    Sacramento, CA
    Posts
    2,943

    Posted On:
    7/12/2003 5:46am

    supporting member
     Style: Five Animal Fighting

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    When you kick, unless you are jumping, you are standing on one leg. Until your foot hits the target 100% of your weight is on that one leg. There is nothing you can do to change that.

    Now I can shift my weight to my rear leg, and still kick "forward" by moving my entire body, including my support leg. My COG is moving forward, BUT I had to shift my weight to my rear leg.

    <marquee>Dragon , Snake , Tiger , Leopard , Crane. R.M.F.A.F.T.A.T.! </marquee>
  6. Jamoke is offline

    Shock'n Y'all

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Danvers MA
    Posts
    1,673

    Posted On:
    7/12/2003 7:36am

    supporting member
     Style: Kempo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    GREAT THREAD GUYS.... keep up the great responses, they are all GOOD!
  7. MMA_Phil is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Pacific
    Posts
    780

    Posted On:
    7/12/2003 7:42am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In Muay Thai you often see the fighters lean back for frontal knees or kicks; it gives you more range, lets you put your hips into the kick more, and gives you more protection from catching a punch.

    In general, IMHO a 50/50 stance is best; if you are in the clinch and you get caught with all of your weight on one foot then you can get thrown - heel trap lateral drop for example.
  8. BigRod is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    CST
    Posts
    112

    Posted On:
    7/12/2003 8:03am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "in addition to involving a delay because of the weight shifting, which will of course delay the kick,"

    Weight shifting doesnt cause any delay in anything. All it takes is a slight movement to shift weight from on leg to another.
  9. BigRod is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    CST
    Posts
    112

    Posted On:
    7/12/2003 8:19am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "in any event, bad 50/50 is the type of 'stance' in which it is difficult or slow to move from(or through). this is called double weighting."

    This is insane. There is NOTHING wrong with a 50/50 weight distribution. How is it slow? YOu can move in ANY direction with a 50/50 weight distribution.

    Just to clarify, I'm refering to being in more a boxers stance...One leg forward, one back, feet shoulder width apart.
  10. BigRod is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    CST
    Posts
    112

    Posted On:
    7/12/2003 8:22am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "in addition to involving a delay because of the weight shifting, which will of course delay the kick, this method described here is not advisable. to throw this kick, you shift your weight BACK to kick FORWARD, this means your hips and c.o.g. is moving backwards as you kick forward. this will have a few disadvantages."

    I'm not talking about moving backwards, I'm talking about redistributing your weight. Big difference.
Page 3 of 7 FirstFirst 123 4567 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.