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  1. #11
    deus ex machina's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2002
    Posts
    3,365
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Sounds like my first day of grade school. *****.

    ~
    danny

    "All this talk about 'newbies' is making me a little nervous. You guys don't have any sort of secret hazing initiation involving wooden paddles and me screaming 'Thank you sir, may I have another?!' do you?"

  2. #12

    Join Date
    Aug 2002
    Posts
    284
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think u Need to train in Aikido for Many years in Order to make it "Affective" Hmmmm....

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Location
    Bolton, Lancashire, UK
    Posts
    2,611
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    To make aikido effective you need to train without any illusions of peace love and harmony, train hard, and learn to punch.
    This will generally result in you being unwelcome at every aikido club you visit as you dont show enough "harmony" for the basket weavers.
    Taking responsibility for my actions since 1989

  4. #14
    Das Moose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Belfast, NI
    Posts
    1,837
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Aikido doesn't work? Bullshit. As I've stated before, I've used aikido techinques in real situations.

    Same techinques as taught in the aikido school i went to, only with slightly more aggression.

    [Das Moose]

    Chum Sut Total Fighting - www.chumsut.com

  5. #15

    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    London
    Posts
    305
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    We recently had a class where we tested out wrist/finger/thumb locks with and without weapons (sticks/kubotan). Against a resisting opponent they are very difficult to apply.

    Like Superhappy7 said, you have to give them some pain first, a few hooks, knees, strikes of your perfrence, then you can put the lock on.

    Resistance combined with sweat will make most locks useless unless some sort of "preparation" for the lock is used.

    They bloody hurt once put on though.

  6. #16

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    18,608
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    hence punching them in the face to stop their resistance

    --
    Hard work, Patience, Dedication.
    http://www.fightauthority.com/
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  7. #17
    Community Corrections Officer supporting member
    Matt W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Posts
    3,621
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I studied a bit of Hapkido in years past. Got a coupla belts up from white. Here's my opinion on joint locks (and I have a sneaking suspicion the same would apply to trapping). They do work! But only in specific situations.

    I actually used a joint lock on a larger, resisting opponent when I was a kid. It worked fantastic. Here's the thing, though. They don't, IMO, work against someone who's trying to smash your face in. They only work in situations where someone is trying to control or intimidate you (grabbing, pushing, putting their hands on you, etc.). In those situations, they do work and work well.

    I think that's because in those situations they are giving you the joint/limb to work with. When someone is simply trying to pound you into pulp, however, they are swinging hard and fast (and not leaving a joint or limb just hanging out there for you to work with), and that makes grabbing a wrist and locking it very difficult to do. Or they are using large body movement grappling (eg. tackling/shooting, etc.) which also makes it difficult to grab an arm or wrist. I would guess that is why they don't work well in the ring (UFC, Pride, etc.).

    But if you're a bouncer, or a cop? If you are only worried about some a-hole with an ego getting in your face at a club? Then I think joint locks work beautifully, and are a great tool to have at your disposal.

    Regards,
    Matt

    "My cat's name is Mittens."
    Ralph Wiggum

  8. #18
    Das Moose's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Location
    Belfast, NI
    Posts
    1,837
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Like every other aspect of hand to hand, you should have the techniques and skills available for if you ever need them..
    Oh yeah - trapping? There are a lot of different examples of trapping, indeed a joint lock can even be considered a type of trap. I've used a trap to defuse a situation (i grabbed the guy's left arm with my right then flipped my elbow up into a bong sau to catch his otehr punch with my elbow then rolled him into an armbar) - it's like anything else, you just need to apply it correctly and in the right situation.

    [Das Moose]

    Chum Sut Total Fighting - www.chumsut.com

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Mar 2003
    Posts
    109
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I am sorry to hear that some of you wasted valuable time learning at an Aikido school that teaches ineffective technique. That must really suck, maybe you should have shopped around a little first. I am glad that my Aikido school does teach Aikido that works.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Oct 2002
    Posts
    8,046
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I actually used a joint lock on a larger, resisting opponent when I was a kid. It worked fantastic. Here's the thing, though. They don't, IMO, work against someone who's trying to smash your face in. They only work in situations where someone is trying to control or intimidate you (grabbing, pushing, putting their hands on you, etc.). In those situations, they do work and work well.
    At my hkd school those are the only situations they're even really taught for.

    .
    .
    .
    My single chopstick is bad at serving soup, cutting steaks and basting roasts and chickens. Besides that it owns.

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