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  1. 9chambers

    Guest

    Posted On:
    6/01/2003 4:02am


     

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    There is an argument about how long it takes someone to get choked out on another thread. I was looking for any articles on the subject that I could post and I found this article on the dangers of applying a naked choke wrong. I thought I better post it. This could be the reason a certain bouncer we were talking about killed someone.

    - - -

    * Watch Your Technique for the Rear Naked Choke

    One of the most effective self-defense techniques Iíve encountered is the rear naked choke. It renders the attackers unconscious in seconds with no injury to either party. It can be effectively used by women and small boned people just as easily (often times more easily) as guys with big muscular arms. Gene LaBell says, "In my opinion, this is the best naked choke that you can attempt. It is the quickest and the safest." (I even have some anecdotal evidence of a intended rape victim who successfully used this technique to choke her would-be attacker unconscious after she talked her way around to his back with some sort of backrub ploy.)

    Judo players call it "hadaka juji jime" and many law enforcement agencies call it a "rear carotid neck restraint". The terminology "naked" refers to the fact that the choke does not use any of his clothing, just your arm.

    Itís a great technique that has been upgraded to "near lethal" force in some jurisdictions, yet it has been used safely in judo and jiu-jitsu for more than a century. BUT, thatís because of two reasons. First, martial artists are trained in how to put it on correctly and second, the person being choked usually "taps out" quickly ending the match.

    However, there a couple of things to watch out for when out of the competitive arena and on the street. First, many people do NOT put the choke on correctly and the morons that need to be choked out do not KNOW how to tap out. They continue to struggle, which requires the choke to be put on harder and longer Ė two elements that exacerbate the problems when a choke is done incorrectly.

    A large number of grapplers that Iíve worked out with that are primarily wrestlers and judo players tend to pull their forearm across the opponentís trachea (windpipe). This is extremely painful and results in a QUICK tap. Iíve even been taught the old LAPD technique in a law enforcement class that used the forearm across the throat. In fairness to the instructor he was careful to make sure that part of the technique that was taught required the student to pull the trachea over to one side before the choke went on. (Go ahead and push your trachea over to one side or the other. I know itís a little freaky, but it moves a good distance. EMTís know that a deviated trachea (the patientís windpipe is moved to one side or the other) could indicate a hemopneumothorax.

    The problem here is that if the rear choke is taught incorrectly, the positioning of the hands (yours) can cause you to pull BACK and ACROSS the attackerís trachea resulting in his injury or death. There have been some big-time judgements against cities and corporations for police officers, jailers or security guards who have killed people with an improper technique. Unfortunately, some of the contra-indicators for the use of the rear carotid neck restraint is that the suspect is obese and either high on alcohol or drugs. Those seem to be precisely the guys you HAVE to choke out Ė some gigantic 300-pound guy who is jacked up and swatting everyone and everything out of his path. I rarely have the need to put the technique on small, sober guysÖ

    The key to doing the technique safely is to get your choking arm DEEP in so that the crook of your elbow is directly over his trachea to protect it. Your biceps and your forearm should contact the SIDES of his neck contacting his common carotid arteries, not the front of his neck where his trachea could be involved.

    This requires that the hand of your choking arm come up really high towards your own shoulder. If you use the old and often taught method of resting your non-choking hand on HIS shoulder and clasping your choking hand there, you will most likely pull back across his windpipe.

    http://www.defendu.com/newsletteroct2001.htm

    - - -

    >> Perhaps it was because I had an inherent skill for the science and never deviated from natural principles. - Miyamoto Musashi 1643

    Edited by - 9chambers on June 01 2003 04:03:49
  2. PizDoff is offline

    .

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    18,607

    Posted On:
    6/02/2003 4:50pm

    supporting memberstaff
     Style: Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i have the defendu.com newsletter sent to me...

    judoinfo.com has some stuff as well

    --
    Hard work, Patience, Dedication.

    When or where the way is free - strike.
    If the way is not free make it free and - Strike.
    Stick with what comes and when the way is free - Strike.
    As they retreat follow through and - Strike.
    Surfing Facebook at work? Spread the good word by adding us on Facebook today! https://www.facebook.com/Bullshido
  3. Omega Supreme is offline

    Administrator

    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    West Coast
    Posts
    22,961

    Posted On:
    6/02/2003 5:23pm

    staff
     Style: Chinese Boxing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well that was educational. Seriously

    Go away I'm talking to myself
  4. MMA_Phil is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    Pacific
    Posts
    780

    Posted On:
    6/02/2003 6:05pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Good post m8.
    I think the key factor is just to get as much pressure on as possible. If you can't sink it then you can always switch it to a neck crank :)

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