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  1. hl1978 is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/15/2006 9:59am


     Style: Aunkai

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ImBatman
    In this context, I'm guessing that 'body mechanics' refers to how you body is held upon execution, whereas 'technique' is more directly related to whichever action is being performed. In other words, body mechanics is a more holistic term than technique which can be narrowed to specific properties directly related to an action being performed. Again, this is very context-dependent; I'm sure the terms could be used interchangably elsewhere.

    For example, if I throw a side-kick at an shield, I would describe the 'technique' aspect as all of the actions directly related to the act of extending my leg and angling my foot. The body mechanics, on the other hand, would be more of the orientation of my entire body, the movement of my body mass, and the connections (or lack thereof) throughout.

    In this context, I would keep in mind how many IMA stress the power generation groundpath. That is more of a discussion of body mechanics as it is related to orientation and movement as a whole.

    It's easy to argue the overlap and ambiguities between body mechanics and technique, but it seems like something that is easier felt than explained. Does this help?

    *edit - I evidently didn't read the rest of the thread after your question, but I'll leave my two cents in for discussion's sake.
    Thanks, I think you explained it better than me.

    Also, this stuff is bit easier to explain if you "feel" it, as strange as it sounds. Once you feel it then you can get that "aha" moment, and then try to do it consistantly.
  2. Phrost is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/15/2006 11:01am

    Business Class Supporting Memberstaff
     Guy Who Pays the Bills and Gets the Death Threats Style: MMA (Retired)

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    BJJ and Neji?



    Obviously I have nothing to contribute here that hasn't already been said.
  3. BaguaMonk is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/18/2006 6:11am


     Style: Alien Cosmic Chi Quan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Its obvious the comment about Matt Hughes and Royce Gracie was wrong.

    But he's not too far off about the BJJ and IMA. All he was saying was that just like in IMA, the best way to win is to stay calm, minimize fatigue, and use the best manipulation of force/movement to strike at the right time (ok so thats my own interpretation of it).

    As for technique vs body mechanics debate, I see it similarly. The difference in IMA vs other arts is that you are not focusing on "technique" or trying to rely simply on muscle memory. taiji for example (as most other IMA's) involve keeping contact with the limbs and sensing the momentum, force, and direction of your opponents movement. WIth correct body mechanics, and overall being relaxed, it is very difficult for your opponent to have solid to "grab on to." You don't really think, or have to tell yourself that it is right time to do technique, but you kind of "feel" it and your whole body immediately reacts.

    In striking, there is alot more going on then simply body mechanics, muscles (the internal ones in specific) are twisting, compresseing, releasing, using the whole body as a whip, or a wave etc. The difference is that a karate guy will teach the "technique" and expect you to repeat it over and over so that it becomes natural (which in effect is probably restricting as the ideal situation to apply it probably will never come up). While in XingYi, your physical action should be a direct result of your intention, completely relaxed, but explosive. The purpose of the form (for example Taiji) is not to teach you techniques over and over, but rather to condition your mind and body (in particulra the body mechanics) to be lose and natural, but still strong and explosive. In this way it is much different because proper body mechanics, and efficient use of the whole-body becomes something that is natural, second-nature. And from there you can manifest the "technique" (even make up your own) to whatever situation, or angle of attack might be. It might sound complicated, but in application it really looks simple. And if you apply it realistically to punching, it might not even look that different to Boxing..

    I don't see it as seperate. Train both technique, and serious technical training, as well as "sensitivity" and "flow." Brings out great results. Also I hate how stylized and ritiualized some IMA styles have become, no point in trying to use minimum effort when an opportunity might present itself to simply knock the guy the **** out.
    Last edited by BaguaMonk; 7/18/2006 6:29am at .
  4. MrMcFu is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/18/2006 6:19am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by BaguaMonk
    But he's not too far off about the BJJ and IMA. All he was saying was that just like in IMA, the best way to win is to stay calm, minimize fatigue, and use the best manipulation of force/movement to strike at the right time (ok so thats my own interpretation of it).
    What MA doesn't tell you to do that?
  5. BaguaMonk is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/18/2006 6:23am


     Style: Alien Cosmic Chi Quan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well i kind of stated some of the differences (at least what seperates IMA from alot of different arts) in above post, but I edited it after you posted.

    Your right, thats how it should be in all arts. And this sort of "Zen" approach can be applied and found in all forms of self-defense, even if some guy has no notion of the mystical mumbo jumbo.
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