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  1. Aesopian is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/04/2006 10:42am

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    5 + 1 Stages of Resistance

    Below is an article by Indrek Reiland of Aliveness Gym Estonia (SBG) on the 5+1 stages of resistance he uses to coach his students. He had originally developed these and written about them before learning about the SBG training methods, but he found that his methods matched up nicely with their curriculum and the I-method in particular.

    This articles has been very useful for helping me think of new games and drills when I am coaching, and as a student it has made me think about how to best help my training partner learn.

    How to act as a training partner to help your partner learn

    Stage 1 (Introduction 1)

    This is the stage when you as a training partner help the one learning to learn the technique by not giving any resistance at all. You are as dead as a dummy. Even when he leaves out some details that make the technique work, you do not resist. Using the scissors sweep as an example, despite not pulling your weight on top of himself to do the sweep, you still let yourself be swept.

    This is the first part of the Introduction stage. It´s only needed with complete beginners, and even then only a couple of times with each technique. It´s needed just to get them to understand where the grips should be and where their limbs should be.

    Continuing our scissors sweep example, the left knee goes in across the stomach and the right foot touches the ground. The right hand grabs his left hand and the left hand grabs his collar or back of the head. If a beginner does that for 2-3 times and gets a little feel and understanding of his limbs and the grips, he doesn´t need that stage anymore.

    This stage is not needed for guys who have a basic understanding of the game, but the stage is still helpful for teaching slower people or complete beginners to understand just where the limbs go, the grips and the body mechanics.

    My own experience shows that it´s sometimes useful to let them do the techinque a couple of times like this, so they get an understanding how it works. Otherwise some guys tend to for example switch the grips for the sweep or do it to the wrong side or etc.)

    Stage 2 (Introduction 2)

    This is the Stage 2 of Introduction phase. Now you as a partner still do not give any resistance, but you do not help the other guy do the technique. By this I mean that when he doesn´t do it completely right, you do not let it happen. For instance, when he doesn´t pull your weight on top of him and do a good scissor movement then you will not let him sweep you—instead you correct him by saying “Pull my weight on top of you and then do the movement… Very good… Correct. Now let´s do it again.”

    This should be the way everyone with basic understanding should start learning (or in this case helping your partner to learn) the technique.

    This is the technical reptition stage where the most important thing is to understand the mechanics of the technique and how it works and from what situation to use it, as well getting the body mechanics right.

    Stage 3 (Isolation 1)

    This stage correlates with beginning of the Isolation stage. You as a training partner start to get some Aliveness into the training, such as in the form of a drill.

    In this stage you as a partner do not have your own goals yet, but you are in an alive drill, not letting him just exercise the sweep in a dead manner. You do not let him just pull your weight on top of him, you try to break the grips, get him moving and so on—but you do not have your own goals, e.g. passing the guard.

    This could be called one-sided isolation. The most important thing to understand about this stage as a training partner is that you have to act in accordance to your partners size, technique and experience. You are supposed to help him learn in an alive manner, but not fight back at all cost.

    A better example might be top or bottom game drills. For top drills, the top guy has a goal to dominate and move; the bottom guy (the training partner for this article) is only trying to get his partner to move—not to escape but to get the correct posture and make his partner fight for the top control. In a bottom drill, the bottom guy has the goal to escape, while the other one is just moving and giving alive resistance but not with the goal to dominate or hold the other one down.

    Let´s take double leg takedown drills from some punching or focus mitt drills as another example. In this stage, the one guy has to finish the takedown according to his partners resistance, but the other guys goal is not to sprawl or defend. The only goal is to make his partners life harder with moving and presenting different energy (pressure forward/falling back) for finishing the double leg.

    At this stage drills are tremendously effective for getting the techniques learnt in Introduction to work in an alive manner, yet in a way that allows the one doing the techniques to practice it without being afraid of the partner ruining his training. The partner is not killing the learner’s objectives to learn. This helps everyone and creates better training partners overall.

    Stage 4 (Isolation 2)

    This is an advanced Isolation or two-sided isolation stage. You begin from a position, such as the scissor sweep position with neutral grips, and both have a special goal. In this case, it is to get the scissor sweep and to pass the guard. Both partners go at a selected ratio of technical resistance they choose together from 10-100%. After one side manages to complete his goal they restart again from the specific position. You as a training partner have your own goal and also learn as you’re helping the other to learn to defend your goal and achieve his own by alive training.

    For instance, one can work the double leg (or both can shoot depending on the drill) and the receiving end will give his effort to defend/sprawl and get to a better position. Or one has the goal to dominate from the top (side control, modified scarf hold or mount) and the other tries to escape.

    This is the phase where most of the real training occurs.

    By the way, I believe that differentiating—Isolation 1 and Isolation 2—has tremendously helped my ability to create drills and get the point across.

    Stage 5 (Integration)

    This is basically technical sparring. You can start from an isolated position (making it a sort of Isolation stage step) or on the knees or standing up.

    Partners (or coach) choose the intensity from 10-100%. You can give or have different goals, like passing the guard or getting a submission, but it´s basically sparring with a technical emphasis. The difference between isolated positional training in this stage and the previous Stage 4 isolation training is that partners do not have a single specific goal but rather an overall goal (like tapping the other guy out) or personal goals they set themselves (like working on their escapes) or to integrate newly learned techniques into ones game. In my opinion, this is how most sparring should be done. You as a partner help the other guy learn by technically sparring him; help him learn to defend and attack and so on. This is technical sparring at a choosen intensity level—it´s not a competition or a deathmatch.

    The integration at this stage comes more from a personal mindset like “Today in sparring, I am gonna drill only guard passing and top game.”

    These are the five stages of resistance that you can give to your partner while learning techniques and fighting.

    And the + 1 Stage

    This is the stage when you stop being a training partner. This is all-out sparring, fighting and competing where you use whatever means you can (if in a competition or in the gym then according to the rules; if on the street then by any means and so on). You use strength at this stage also and are probably just trying to get the other guy tap by any reasonable means, which makes this different from the technical sparring phase. You stop being a training partner in the sense that you are supposed to be there to help your partner and yourself learn. Instead you have your own goal that you have to get using any agreed upon means available.

    This type of training is good on some occasions but problems occur when people switch from any previous stage (especially Stage 5) to this stage during training when they should not. There is a higher risk of injury and other problems.

    But of course this type of training must be done too to prepare for competitions or to create an environment similar to self defense situations (in MMA or self defense drills).

    I hope that the article has helped you to assess your training and understand it a little bit better.
  2. eviechu is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/04/2006 1:37pm


     Style: Relson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This is awesome. A few people I train with or used to train with needs to look at this...
  3. Feryk is offline

    Boneheaded Optimist

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    Posted On:
    7/04/2006 3:03pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Good article. Nice find, Aesop.
    Quote Originally Posted by pauli
    i was once told that "do" means wrecking people's **** for your own philosophical betterment.

    Quote Originally Posted by melvin_peebles
    I could be mistaking dumbness for delusion. I'll have to go dig out my DSM IV. It's great to have stumbled upon this site. The rich fauna and flora of mental dysfunction that exists in the martial arts is amazing. It's like the Galapagos.
  4. Aesopian is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/04/2006 9:09pm

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What I found interesting about Indrek's system was how he does more than just break down resistance in a physical sense (like "fight hard, now fighter harder"), but also by how goal-oriented and purpose-driven the partner is, and the scope of the drilling or sparring.

    You start with no goals or purposes beyond letting your partner do repetitions of a technique (Stages 1 and 2).

    You then start adding physical resistance, but are still mostly without a goal (Stage 3). You run interference, move around, mess with grips, etc. but not try to impose your own techniques (e.g. doing a guard pass while they work on a sweep). This can scale up to 100% in terms of physical resistance, but as a partner you never really have your own goal and are not trying to prevent their technique at all costs.

    You build on the last stage by taking up your own specific goals and purposes, but the scope of the drilling/sparring is still isolated to the material being taught (Stage 4). Now is when you would actively try to pass guard while they work for a sweep.

    Once the isolation ends, the training partners enter free sparring and rolling where both sides have their own goals and purposes, which may or may not include the material they learned in the earlier stages (Stage 5).

    I find this system interesting since it addresses once of my main criticisms of how BJJ is taught, which is the jump between instruction and drilling with zero resistance to all out sparring. The fleshing out of the isolation stages bridges this gap and makes it easier for the student to take what they are learning, drill it statically and against progressively increasing resistance (in terms of phsyical and technical difficulty) and finally bring it into their game through sparring.
  5. Oscar Goldman is offline
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    Judo: the anti-trapple

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    Posted On:
    7/04/2006 9:35pm

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     Style: Jujutsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Aesopian
    I find this system interesting since it addresses once of my main criticisms of how BJJ is taught, which is the jump between instruction and drilling with zero resistance to all out sparring. The fleshing out of the isolation stages bridges this gap and makes it easier for the student to take what they are learning, drill it statically and against progressively increasing resistance (in terms of phsyical and technical difficulty) and finally bring it into their game through sparring.
    My instructor has fixed basic and intermediate material that is taught like this. Focus will be one area like basic guard attacks and he will show one technique like a guillotine or kimura, then let each partner drill it three times guided by his vocal cues increasing speed with each repetition. Then we'll do the same with two or three more related techniques, then do some drilling. Primary partner is limited to material from that night's class, secondary partner's job is to not be a bitch and throw the counter at 100% since you know exactly what tools your partner has to use and to make sure to give him an opening to use the attacks. The resistance rule is that your resistance is right when the guy had to fight for it a little but felt like he got it himself.


    The nicest thing is that every new person has to do all 12 Basic curriculum classes before getting a stripe and getting permission to free roll / spar. This cuts down so much new guy spaz out bullshit and I'm guessing prevents some injuries. You know for sure that by the time someone hits the mat they know the names of all the positions and basic subs and have drilled putting on subs slowly, etc. It also gives our instructor and the senior students time to check people out and "correct" them if they are meatheads or UFC posers who can't wait to kneebar somebody.
    Last edited by Oscar Goldman; 7/04/2006 9:37pm at . Reason: type
  6. eviechu is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/05/2006 10:19pm


     Style: Relson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I did this all today in class. It was great. It was all grip breaks from different positions, then if they break on position where you go from there step by step. Then sparring this was just fantastic.

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