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  1. Wynergy is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/03/2006 2:17pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Competition training

    So, I just found out about a grappling competition that I could actually make it to in about a month and a week. I'm interested in entering the light-weight novice division (under 1 year experience), it's no-gi and I mostly do gi training. I've never done competition before, the rules and points system look fairly standard and I'm familiar with those, but I'm not sure what's best to work on in order to compete effectively.

    Apart from standup and no gi training, are there exercises and drills that I should be doing to practice, and in addition, what level of intensity should I be practicing at, in terms of resistance and frequency? I don't want to injure myself/burn out, but I would like to be in top form for such a thing. Thank you!

    Website for this competition: www.negrappling.com
  2. eviechu is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/03/2006 2:42pm


     Style: Relson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Well, the rules are pretty much standard for BJJ.

    Omega is not quite right in saying not try for a submission.
    If you submit you WIN. Of course you should train techniques - pass the guard, pass half guard, escape mount, escape side control, escape back mount, etc. AAAALLL that good stuff. Concentrate on that.

    Concentrate on takedowns and how to move on after getting taken down. Since this is no gi, there is no use to trying to submit from standing, its going to be pretty much a ground game. I do agree with omega, spar every other day. If you do train more than 3 hours a day, separate it out by several hours.

    Do not train the day before.

    For cardio jump rope 3 mins once in the morning and then again later that day. That is what I did for my tourney and I didn't have any gas problems.
    Lift weights, get two 3 lbs and stretch your arms straight out to your sides like this
    - | - .
    Then circle them forward for 30 seconds, then circle them backwards for 30 seconds. Take a weight that goes on equipment. Whatever weight you can handle and sorta lift it on each side of your body up to your core on each side in a fluid motion.

    Practice upa drils.

    Rest alot. Again don't train the day before. Do only slight cardio warmups before... not thing major.. just a few jumping jacks maybe. Stretch, stretch, stretch

    Try to get info on who is going, then ask your teacher if he knows anything about their style of competing then know what to expect.
    Last edited by Aesopian; 7/03/2006 2:47pm at .
  3. Wynergy is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/03/2006 2:48pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    *prints and scurries off to do such* I'm planning on asking my instructor as well, when it starts up after the holiday. The only newcomer who has stayed as consistently as my partner and me is training for competition too, so I'll work with her. Thank you all for the excellent advice!
  4. Yrkoon9 is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/03/2006 3:18pm

    supporting member
     Style: 5.56

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Normally I eviscerate people who make these kinds of threads. Your only saving grace is that you posted it a month before the competition, not a week. In a month you MIGHT be able to do the preparation neccessary. Normally I would advocate at least 2 months to prepare.

    I will agree with MOST of what Omega said. If you look carefully he outlined ONE KEY CONCEPT : CONDITIONING

    He suggested anaerobic cardio, resistance training, and rest.

    THOSE ARE KEY.

    No matter how many moves you learn, no matter how slick your takedown is, and how awesome you look doing a flying armbar NOTHING MATTERS MORE THAN CONDITIONING IN COMPETITION.

    Skill will take you through a couple of matches in a tournament. But the guys in the finals have skill and conditioning. And if you are going there to win you need to be able to hang with these guys.

    Long slow runs are okay. But sprints are much better. Some people like 100yds. Some like 200yds. Some 400yds. I don't think it matters. What matters is that you are left in the fetal position as you alternative dry heaving and gasping for air. Because this is the physical state you will be in after a couple of matches. And you cannot prepare like this alone. You need a partner there to push you. Preferably a trainer.

    Okay so maybe you are running those sprints a couple of times a week. You need resistance training. With only a month to prepare I do not think you can make any real strength gains. Noticable strength gains come over longer periods. You can do some muscular endurance work. High reps, lower weight. Somewhere around 20 reps and until failure. Maybe some circuit training as you go from machine to machine, weight to weight. While it shouldn't have you gasping for air you need at least 1 good workout a week where you can't raise your arms you are so tired. This is dangerous because you probably don't have a good background so you will be prone to injury. So I would back off the intensity from being so tired you can't raise your arms to maybe....so tired you can barely raise your arms.

    Other forms of resistance training can be done with a partner, or rubber bands, or whatever. But these are more sport-specific and generally require more supervision and experience than a less-than-1-year novice has unless he has experience as an athlete in other sports.

    Honestly, most sport athletic conditioning will apply to grappling. It should be tweaked to add more anaerobic and explosive excersizes.

    The REST part of the equation is what is tricky. After a hella workout where you can't raise your arms you need rest and nutrition. This is the pitfall of many combat athletes. They are motivated by a fear of losing, and don't want to take any time off training because they feel thier opponent might be getting the edge on them. Combine that with the tendency of these athletes to try and cut weight(oftentimes cutting out nutrition) it is a receipe for disaster. Nothing will slow you down faster than an injury. Overtraining, lack of rest, and bad nutrition can really hurt you. Literally.

    Now training specifically for a no-gi tournament you need to train...duh... without the gi. I would say at least 50-80% of your training should be without the gi. If you cannot do this IN CLASS, then you need to do it outside of class. I would recommend 100% no-gi training, but that might kill off all class time. I don't know your situation.

    What should you work on?

    Simple. Work on YOUR stuff. Not the latest killer moves off a DVD you are going to get in 1 week. Work on your two best guard passes. Work on your 2 best sweeps. Work on your 2 best armlocks. Drill them. Drill them in combination. Drill them over and over and over. Drill them with speed. Drill them against a stronger person. Drill them when you are fresh. Drill them when you are tired. Drill them until your partners get so sick of drilling they want to quit and start rolling. Then you get a new partner and you drill some more.

    When it comes to sparring you need to do it. A lot of it. It would be better to roll against guys of similar size, but you should look for partners with different attributes. Some guys who are faster. Some guys who are stronger. Some guys who are way better than you. Some guys of same skill. And a few who aren't as good. You need guys that understand you are going into competition and cannot afford to get injured, however minor it might be. For instance, taking you out of commision for 2 days by trying to 'finish' you with the fastest fucking armlock you have ever seen that hyperextends your elbow...you know...they were just trying to 'help'. Screw that. You don't need that kind of help. You need guys who are going to go hard, but are going to go safe also. Guys you can trust. Preferably guys with competition experience.

    Now as for the competition itself you need to ask, are you there to win or are you there for experience? I don't go to compete for experience. That comes naturally. Usually from a large number of matches. And that large number of matches comes from the fact that I wasn't a fucking speed bump scrub who gassed out in the first round. I got those matches because I kept winning and winning and winning until I made it to the finals. And there, at the finals, I will give my opponent everything I have. And if I win it was because I prepared to win. If I lose it was because my opponent was better than I was - not because I did not prepare adequately.
  5. eviechu is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/03/2006 3:28pm


     Style: Relson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Of course you condition, you should be conditioning anyways - just step it up. But all in all you can either be strong or smart. BJJ does not always rely on strength like in other martial arts, it's skill in pull off the technqiues.
  6. eviechu is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/03/2006 5:18pm


     Style: Relson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Omega
    You're going to make me kill you aren't you? You're going to be walking down the street and all your friends are going to be "what happened to you" and you're going to say "I pissed off this guy named omega and he killed me" and they're going to say "what an asshole, why'd he do that" and you're going to say "because I didn't read his posts correctly" and they'd be like....well you get the picture one way or the other you'd be dead.

    I didn't say don't go for submissions I said avoid submissions, as in don't get caught up in them. The idea is to accumulate enough points for you to play your game without worrying about being tapped by a stupid mistake. I hate these BJJ rules applied to no gi tournaments.

    *smile* :eusa_ange
  7. fedeykin is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/03/2006 6:30pm


     Style: Dead Lemur Style

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ---no more than 3 hours of training per day----------




    howcome??
  8. Shaolinz is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/03/2006 6:41pm


     Style: Muay Thai , BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by fedeykin
    ---no more than 3 hours of training per day----------

    howcome??
    You don't want to break your toy do you?
  9. eviechu is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/03/2006 6:47pm


     Style: Relson Gracie Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    haha... good point.
  10. GranoblasticMan is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/03/2006 8:23pm


     Style: BJJ, WMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Yrkoon9
    Long slow runs are okay. But sprints are much better. Some people like 100yds. Some like 200yds. Some 400yds. I don't think it matters. What matters is that you are left in the fetal position as you alternative dry heaving and gasping for air.
    I love this quote.

    Very good advice, in my opinion. The only way you can increase your endurance is to push it to this limit constantly.
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