228429 Bullies, 3786 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 1 to 10 of 34
Page 1 of 4 1 234 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. Teh El Macho is offline
    Teh El Macho's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Porcupine/Hollywood, FL & Parmistan via Elbonia
    Posts
    11,762

    Posted On:
    6/25/2006 12:13pm

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    recommended earliest age for starting MA

    Hmm, for those of you guys with experience in teaching and in particular teaching children, what would be the youngest age a child can start?

    I have a nephew who's 4 and going to be 5. And I've seen most dojos with an after school program for children 5 and older. In the case of my nephew, I would prefer to wait until he is 6, but my sister is seriously considering it (I'll explain later.)

    For my nephew, I'd prefer he go to a judo school nearby, but my sis will most likely take him to a krotty school (after considering her own work schedule and driving distance and **** like that.) If it keeps my nephew active and teachs him something... anything, I guess it's fine.

    I your experience, what's the youngest age you would recommend for a child?

    Now, this is the catch. My nephew suffers a bit from autism and ADD. He excells at doing things on his own, puzzles, painting, spelling, etc. And he follows most instructions. But he sometimes choses NOT to focus on following instructions (either he choses not to or he has a hard time focusing... ADD for ya), and in the presence of other kids sometimes he becomes a bit hyperactive (jumping, hugging and tackling kids.)

    His pre-school teachers suggest he needs to be immerse more with children his age (more than what he is experiencing in pre-school). This is one of the main reasons my sisters wants to enroll him in a martial arts school ... plus she is determined to give him a healthy sport-based lifestyle. Whether it's MAs, football, **** even ballet. Whatever it happens to be, it will be a fitness-oriented lifestyle.

    Sooo, what do you guys think?
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  2. Bugeisha is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Minnesota, USA
    Posts
    476

    Posted On:
    6/25/2006 12:23pm


     Style: Kyokushin

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't think it would be a bad idea. We've got kids that sound a lot like your nephew at our dojang, and it oftentimes helps them.

    I personally wouldn't worry too much about which martial art he was doing this early. At his age, feeling comfortable at the school, liking the feel of the place and the teachers, and not getting scammed by outrageous prices are more important than training for hardcore application. Of course, you don't want somewhere that would make him think he could fight when he couldn't, but I think that at a young age the training is more about building attributes that will make it easier to train for "real" later.

    Of course, I don't mean that the training should all be feel-good games and what have you. If that was the case, it would be daycare, not training. What I mean is that a program that will help him develop physically and mentally in a solid direction is more important than one that teaches him to break people. The breaking people part comes when he's a little older.
  3. Neildo is offline
    Neildo's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Vancouver BC
    Posts
    6,045

    Posted On:
    6/25/2006 12:25pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: FBSD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've seen chinese kids start Kung Fu at 4. Depending on how the kids motor skills are developing. My cousin at 2 was already running around causing trouble and imitating funny moves he picked up from wathing ultraman and power rangers and crap like that.

    You and your sister should go around to the various schools that offer the program for young kids and see what the instructors, and the class are like.
    '
    MA might be just the thing for an ADD kid.
  4. pauli is offline

    i keep tryin to spar, but nothin happens!

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    herndon, va, usa
    Posts
    3,521

    Posted On:
    6/25/2006 2:00pm

    supporting member
     Style: karate / bjj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    there's an under 40lbs division (gi and no gi) at local grappling tournaments. there's no earliest age for training, per se; there are just common starting points for different things. breakfalls and tumbling for the youngest, positioning and grip fighting once they can talk, submissions and strikes when they're old enough to understand the danger, etc.

    to my mind, the best thing you can do for young kids is send them to gymnastics. teach them good balance and safe falling *now,* not when they're a clumsy ass adult.

    (and yeah, formal training is great for giving add/aspergers kids a structure within which they know how to behave. one of the reasons i like karate so much)
    Last edited by pauli; 6/25/2006 2:03pm at .
  5. Goju - Joe is offline
    Goju - Joe's Avatar

    I am a Ninja bitches!! Deal with it

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Toronto
    Posts
    7,856

    Posted On:
    6/25/2006 3:26pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Improv comedy

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The most important thing is to find a good teacher, even if it's Krotty you want someone who can get the kids to pay attention and keep it fun at the same time.

    MA training for kids should not be the same training for adults.

    The sensei at my dojo is awesome with kids, one of the best I have ever seen.
  6. Plasma is offline
    Plasma's Avatar

    Bullshido Admin

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,088

    Posted On:
    6/25/2006 3:30pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: 柔術

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by El Macho
    Hmm, for those of you guys with experience in teaching and in particular teaching children, what would be the youngest age a child can start?

    I have a nephew who's 4 and going to be 5. And I've seen most dojos with an after school program for children 5 and older. In the case of my nephew, I would prefer to wait until he is 6, but my sister is seriously considering it (I'll explain later.)

    For my nephew, I'd prefer he go to a judo school nearby, but my sis will most likely take him to a krotty school (after considering her own work schedule and driving distance and **** like that.) If it keeps my nephew active and teachs him something... anything, I guess it's fine.

    I your experience, what's the youngest age you would recommend for a child?

    Now, this is the catch. My nephew suffers a bit from autism and ADD. He excells at doing things on his own, puzzles, painting, spelling, etc. And he follows most instructions. But he sometimes choses NOT to focus on following instructions (either he choses not to or he has a hard time focusing... ADD for ya), and in the presence of other kids sometimes he becomes a bit hyperactive (jumping, hugging and tackling kids.)

    His pre-school teachers suggest he needs to be immerse more with children his age (more than what he is experiencing in pre-school). This is one of the main reasons my sisters wants to enroll him in a martial arts school ... plus she is determined to give him a healthy sport-based lifestyle. Whether it's MAs, football, **** even ballet. Whatever it happens to be, it will be a fitness-oriented lifestyle.
    Sooo, what do you guys think?

    You might already considered it. But I find Judo the best MA for kids (w/ and w/o autism).
    Edit: Oh **** I missed it, you already want Judo: Oh well, this is why I agree I guess.

    1. There is contact. No punch the air and standing in Horse Stance. They can
    "play" around with each other, keeping their interest.

    2. Focus of Nage Waza rather then Joint locking prevents joint injury in young kids. (Developing Joints and all)

    3. Kids bounce.

    Our dojo runs a very successful Kids(5-8) and Pre-Judo (3-5) class. In fact in the Fall they are planning to open an after school Judo program, so kids that have to wait for their parents to come pick them up can just do Judo instead of playing games in school cafeteria. I teach the class on occasion and the kids always have a great time. Whether is balance drills, randori, and just working throws.
    Last edited by Plasma; 6/25/2006 3:35pm at .
  7. Devil is offline
    Devil's Avatar

    His heart was visible, and the dismal sack that maketh excrement of what is eaten.

    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    6,764

    Posted On:
    6/25/2006 3:30pm

    supporting member
     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I've got a slightly different take on it. I really don't think you can put an age on when a kid is ready for martial arts. I think you can expose them to it at an early age, but I don't see any point in starting their training until they ask to do it on their own. It will make life easier on everybody (the kid, the instructor, fellow students, and the parents) if the kid is there because he's actually interested.

    It's cool that your sister wants him to be involved in athletics, but why not wait until he expresses his own interest in something, then help him pursue that? Anyway, that's the plan I have for my kids. I hope whatever she decides to do works out.
  8. Plasma is offline
    Plasma's Avatar

    Bullshido Admin

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    7,088

    Posted On:
    6/25/2006 3:32pm

    supporting memberforum leaderstaff
     Style: 柔術

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by El Macho
    plus she is determined to give him a healthy sport-based lifestyle. Whether it's MAs, football, **** even ballet. Whatever it happens to be, it will be a fitness-oriented lifestyle.

    That makes me happy.
  9. pauli is offline

    i keep tryin to spar, but nothin happens!

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    herndon, va, usa
    Posts
    3,521

    Posted On:
    6/25/2006 5:16pm

    supporting member
     Style: karate / bjj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i just mentioned this discussion to my mom (a first grade teacher), who pointed something else out: some schools, unpon enrollment of a child, send a questionaire to their teacher at school, so they can be aware of any behavioral concerns ahead of time (and so the teacher knows to watch out for wayward karate chops in class). something to look for, i suppose.
  10. TehDeadlyDimMak is offline
    TehDeadlyDimMak's Avatar

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    2,199

    Posted On:
    6/25/2006 6:35pm


     Style: Sanda, BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Depends on the kid.

    Some kids will only be whiny and end up hating martial arts as a whole. Other kids will embrace it and make it something they dedicate a large portion of their lives to.

    Ultimately the question should depend on whether or not he enjoys it. Let him try it out for a bit before committing.
Page 1 of 4 1 234 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.