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  1. Olorin is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/11/2006 5:04pm

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    Overview of Handgun Shooting Stances

    While reading through the threads in the Bullshido Armory, I realized that some people might not understand the differences between the various handgun stances. To clear up any confusion and to promote good shooting techniques I will endeavor to define several popular handgun shooting stances and post a few pictures of each stance. Feel free to correct, or expand upon my descriptions.

    The Isosceles Stance

    Most new shooters will take this stance almost instinctively. The shooter fully extends both arms towards the target. The shoulders are kept perpendicular to the target and both elbows are locked. The name of the stance comes from how the shooter’s arms and shoulders form an isosceles triangle. The advantage to the stance is its simplicity and the fact that eye dominance is not an issue when using the Isosceles Stance. In addition, the shooter centers his/her weight neutrally or might even lean back slightly.

    (source) http://www.io.com/~cortese/firearms/

    Modern Isosceles Stance

    In this modification of the Isosceles Stance, the shooter shifts his/her weight forward and stands more on the balls of their feet. The upper body curls forward, and the shooters’ arms are in line with the his/her shoulders. This creates a strong grip that helps control muzzle flip. When done correctly the arms move in and out with the recoil instead of up and down. The shooter needs to relax their shoulders to help in recoil absorption. In addition, the shooter’s head is more forward than in the traditional Isosceles Stance. With the head forward, the shooter’s balance is further shifted forward and giving a clearer view of the pistol sites in relationship to the target.
    The advantage to this modification is that it solves the problem of muzzle flip associated with the Isosceles Stance. Also, It is simpler that the push/pull dynamic required to properly execute the Weaver Stance. For a more complete description of the stance, see the source listed below.

    (source) http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl...24/ai_65910635

    (source) http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl..._65910635/pg_5



    The Weaver Stance

    This popular shooting stance was developed by Deputy Sheriff Jack Weaver in the late 1950s. Both elbows are belt with the dominant arm bent less than the support arm. The dominant hand (the one holding the pistol) pushes forward while the support hand (wrapped around the pistol) pulls back. The goal of this push/pull technique is to create isometric tension that will control the recoil of the pistol and provide accuracy and control for quick follow up shots. The shooter aligns his/her body at a 45-degree angle to the target and places the dominant hand and foot back foot back.

    (Source)http://weaverstance.com/history.htm

    (Source)http://www.findarticles.com/p/articl..._65910635/pg_4



    The Chapman or Modified Weaver Stance

    This stance is identical to the Weaver Stance but had one important difference. In the Modified Weaver, the shooter locks strait his/her dominant hand and arm. This modification helps with the trembling that some experience while using the Weaver Stance. If properly done, the shooter can still take advantage of the push/pull aspect of the Weaver Stance to control muzzle flip. Also, with the dominant arm locked straightt a shooter cannot overpower his weaker arm during times of stress. The tendency to push to hard in the Weaver Stance will cause a (right handed) shooter’s aim to skew to the left.

    (Source) http://www.io.com/~cortese/firearms/

    (Source) http://www.midwesttraininggroup.net/...ke_a_stand.htm



    Bull’s-eye Stance

    I will not add too much on this one. The feet are shoulder length apart, you hold the pistol in one hand with the arm outstretched, and place the hand not in use on your chest, hip, or even in a pocket. It is a single handed shooting style popularized by duelists. The advantage of the stance was that it allowes the shooter to make himself a smaller target by turning his body to the side thereby presenting the minimum target possible. Outside of Cowboy Action Shooting, I do not think many use this stance today.

    (Source) http://www.agsfoundation.com/safety/tips.html#stances



    Point Shooting

    In general Point Shooting is a technique as much as a stance. Point shooting is designed to allow the shooter to discharge a firearm quickly with no use of the gun's sights. While inherently inaccurate at distances over 30 feet,* a shooter can utilize point shooting in self-defense situations at very close quarters when accuracy is not as important as speed.

    Instead of using the gun's sights, the shooter faces his intended target head on with his body, and then points his gun, like a finger, towards the target by raising the firearm along the centerline of his body. The shooter will also be crouched over in what looks like a deep boxing stance. Fairbairn and Applegate, who promoted this method, believed that this stance replicates a person's natural physical response to danger.

    Point shooting was used by American and British military intelligence during World War II because in can be taught with under twenty hours of instruction. It is not useful for competition shooting and has therefore fallen out of favor since this war. A full discription of this method can be found in Rex Applegate's book. "Kill or Be Killed" which is now available through Paladin Press.

    (Source)http://www.bobtuley.com/pointshooting.htm

    (Source)http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Point_shooting



    * Various studies have indicated that most non-military gunfights and shootings take place at distances of 21 feet and under, frequently under low light conditions.
    Last edited by PizDoff; 7/10/2007 11:48pm at .
  2. Neildo is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/11/2006 5:15pm

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    Sticky please.






    This is awesome.
  3. Bugeisha is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/13/2006 9:42pm


     Style: Kyokushin

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    I really appreciate this thread as well.
  4. Deer-boxer is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/14/2006 9:30am


     Style: wing chun, muay thai, KB

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    Weaver stance FTW!

    for me anyways.

    Great post.
  5. Olorin is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/15/2006 5:35pm

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    Quote Originally Posted by Deer-boxer
    Weaver stance FTW!

    for me anyways.

    Great post.
    I am not a Weaver man either. I have messed around with it but for some reason it always falls apart and I end up back in the Chapman/Modified Weaver. I need to get off my ass and start using the Modern Isosceles Stance. It seems to be what all the top competitors use.
  6. Zendetta is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/15/2006 6:16pm

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     Style: MMA, functional JKD

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    cool **** Olo. made me realize that I was (havn't shot in a while) doing the right thing leaning forward on the balls of my feet (modern iso).

    I thought it just felt natural, especially when firing magnum rounds. kewl.


    ps - happy news: a judge just struck down the ludicrous San Francisco handgun ban.
    "You know what I like about you, William? You like guns AND meditation."
  7. Deer-boxer is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/16/2006 10:40am


     Style: wing chun, muay thai, KB

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    Quote Originally Posted by Olorin
    I am not a Weaver man either. I have messed around with it but for some reason it always falls apart and I end up back in the Chapman/Modified Weaver. I need to get off my ass and start using the Modern Isosceles Stance. It seems to be what all the top competitors use.
    I hear you, lucky for me (well kind of i guess in this sense) I broke my arm twice when I was younger so I can't straighten it all the way, so even if I try to do the modified weaver it just looks like a bastardized weaver. so the arm bent of the weaver feels natural for me. The modern Isosocles is a great one, but I never feel like I can walk and shoot at the same time.
  8. Sam Browning is online now

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    Posted On:
    6/16/2006 11:02am

    hall of famestaff
     

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    Hmm, what about the point shooting stance?
  9. tellner is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/16/2006 2:16pm


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    Some people are just naturally suited for one stance. Others do better with another. The reality is that under pressure an awful lot of highly trained people just "punch" the gun at the target. And it doesn't work that badly.
  10. romba_one is offline

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    Posted On:
    6/16/2006 7:47pm

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    "Bull's-eye stance".... I always wondered if that one had a proper/official/widely accepted name. Thanks for the info.

    Explaining to friends how I shot when target shooting; I always refered to that stance as the "Andrew Jackson" stance. Then had to explain; Jackson was a duelist, who used that low profile stance with a big baggy trench coat to obscure his actual body outline while still providing the appearance of a larger target...so I'd read when I was a kid.

    Anyway; I was taught to put my hand in my pocket, or thumb in my belt, ect to keep movement, created by a flopping arm, from affecting my shot.
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