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  1. #41

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I reckon, still a bit off-topic, that the depth of the stance has much to do with the weapons used, and the delivery method.
    Another issue is if the fight is to be over quickly then you can afford to go with a deep stance if it is useful.
    If a long drawn-out fight will ensue, as in most sport fighting bouts (for example boxing) then the deep stance will just tire your legs, so you absolutely need to fight in a high stance.

    As for the fencing comments, may I suggest the traditional ancient sword fighters used a high stance with short bursts of low work for specific uses, like lunges and low defence responses. Also, the technical manual illustrations (my opinion) artificially lower the stances for clarity and 'coolness'.

  2. #42
    Fantasy Warrior's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Muqatil
    Oh for what it's worth, I don't have to agree or disagree with what's in the article. Given the opportunity, I would listen to what he was saying, try it out and make my own decisions. It all comes back to "whatever floats your boat".
    Why are you participating on a website that is dedicated to combating the BS in martial arts if your opinion is that it "all comes back to whatever floats your boat"? seems pointless to me.
    You are a total Douchbag. Train more, post nevermore.
    FickleFingerOfFate -08-21-2007 08:59 AM

    just die already.
    Plasma - 08-20-2007 11:45 PM


    Aikidokkkkakkakakakaaaaa
    Best MA website ever!!!!!: http://www.dogjudo.co.uk/

  3. #43
    ARGUMENTUM AD LATINUM DICTIONAIRUM Bullshido Newbie
    Doctor X's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Indeed.

    Modern fencing is not "t3h r34l d34dly" fencing you see on t3h str33tz any more than kendo is fighing with a real samurai sword. Modern fencing has adapted to the rules. The fact you cannot move around--you only fight forward and back in a narrow "strip"--hides one of the major limitations of the "classic" fencing stance.

    How many of ye see a beginner fighting in a very "bladed" stance to limit target? This come from the forward-back fighting. How many of ye have done this? Then someone gets around you and kicks your ass. Been there . . . done that. "Hey!"

    The comment on "transition" is very important. Even modern fencers do not fence in a lunge! My style has a "t3h d34dly" stance everyone obsesses over . . . in my style! In reality it is just a "basic." That is it. As a fighting stance it looks . . . like . . . your standard "standup" fighting stance!! Heavens to Betsy! Yet, some in my style will bitch and moan about "angles" and minutia as if it matters:

    "You may have kicked my ass and raped my woman, but your forward foot should be turned 30 degrees, not 35! HA! ME for the win!"

    One other lesson from that. In "static" training it is VERY easy to fool oneself in to "bearing down" into a stance--getting "low." A low stance is INVINCIBLE--if I attack it only in its strong point. I remember a person use to forward challenges getting into a forward-heavy stance. He was strong if you ran straight at him--and I am not a grappler.

    "What if they guy attacks your from, like, a bit of an angle?"

    The problem with the theories from the guy in the opening, is he is trying to justify bad practice by adjusting reality to fit it.

    --J.D.

  4. #44

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    How many of ye see a beginner fighting in a very "bladed" stance to limit target? This come from the forward-back fighting. How many of ye have done this? Then someone gets around you and kicks your ass. Been there . . . done that. "Hey!"
    Er, did you suddenly turn paraplegic? Not able to adjust to your opponent's angular movement AND minimize your profile? And the worst that happens is your opponent gets as big of a target as he would if you were squared off. And is it not useful at times to virtually force your opponent to move laterally? What about additional reach from being "bladed" versus squared? What about balance and footing on difficult terrain? What about having multiple allies and opponents?

  5. #45
    Lane's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Virus
    Something about the ichimonji stance: It makes it easy to do thier own takedowns but nobody ever stands like that. The front leg is just presented for the opponent so all he has to do is push the body back slightly, taking the weight off the front leg, then trip or sweep, hook it out or whatever. You see a lot of stuff like this in their demos. I found when I started doing some MMA that people don't really stand the way they do during bujinkan training, and the way they do stand in a real situation was never covered. Standing side on, with the front leg out is a bad idea in a real fight. If you want stronger legs, hit the gym.
    O-uchi-gari and ko-uchi-gari come to mind as fun things to try.
    --
    L.

  6. #46
    Fantasy Warrior's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Spunky
    What about additional reach from being "bladed" versus squared? What about balance and footing on difficult terrain? What about having multiple allies and opponents?
    I love ninjas. :new_popco

    Have you pressure tested the traditional stance's efficiwency in multiple opponent situations?
    You are a total Douchbag. Train more, post nevermore.
    FickleFingerOfFate -08-21-2007 08:59 AM

    just die already.
    Plasma - 08-20-2007 11:45 PM


    Aikidokkkkakkakakakaaaaa
    Best MA website ever!!!!!: http://www.dogjudo.co.uk/

  7. #47
    Yrkoon9's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ...ninjas...

    There have never been better targets for leg kicks.

  8. #48
    DerAuslander's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Yrkoon9
    ...ninjas...

    There have never been better targets for leg kicks.
    Yes there have.

    We call them TKDers.

  9. #49
    Yes Koto got his name changed, quit asking... supporting member
    VikingPower's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    This ninja's immune to leg kicks. And your odds of applying a wristlock are reduced by 50%.


  10. #50

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The fact of the matter, ichimonji is a retarded stance to do anything in other than transition or finish. As a starting or defensive position, it can provide little to no real help. The majority of the **** involved has limited application to armoured fighting (which makes training it even dumber because so little training is in Yaroi).

    Ichimonji/lunge punch and all that **** should be utilized as a kata to show morons how to add body weight to their strikes, that is it. Making it lower and forcing people to memorize ancient kamae is not in anyone's interest unless pretending to be a ninja/feudal japanese warrior is the goal. If that is the goal, then why get upset when called a LARPer?

    Bladed stances actually limit the options for engaging, a more squared stance with the feet offset slightly offer better balance and options for moving ,cause its natural and in good alignment with the design of the body (sports and modern methods prove these points). Ninjas don't need science though..................They have the ancient wisdom of a crazy old man and his possible fake scrolls to comfort them in their inevitable defeat from a 'sport fighter'.

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