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  1. kungfujew is offline
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    Sexe dans la derrière!

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    Posted On:
    5/06/2006 10:48pm

    supporting member
     Style: Muay Thai Khmer

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Wait wait wait wait wait...
    Wait...
    Wait...
    ...
    You're teaching BJJ to 5-6 yearolds? I mean, at least in krotty or even CMA you got doing summersaults, kicks, punches, etc., but... I mean, it seems like advanced or even basic grappling is beyond what little kids could do or understand.
    Maybe I'm just not giving the little womb-boogers enough credit.
  2. NSLightsOut is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/06/2006 11:27pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by kungfujew
    I mean, at least in krotty or even CMA you got doing summersaults, kicks, punches, etc., but... I mean, it seems like advanced or even basic grappling is beyond what little kids could do or understand.
    Maybe I'm just not giving the little womb-boogers enough credit.
    I do a lot of fitness stuff (squats, running, chinups, pushups, situps etc.) and a fair bit of basic positional grappling (passing guard, sweeping from the guard, escapes, taking the back, takedowns, etc). I think you are giving them too little credit in some respects, as it seems to be more a matter of how the basic concepts are taught than the concepts themselves.

    For example, a month ago, my instructor came up with a method to explain passing and preventing passing through angles using fingerpuppets, of all things. Just with that simple explanation, the kids went up a level in terms of passing and defending. I make it a point to reinforce the lesson on a regular basis to get it into their long-term memories.

    Quote Originally Posted by DAYoung
    Then I realised that at least four of our seniors were kids when they began, and were still training, decades later. Even when they were unfit (a few years off training), they had a natural 'feel' for the moves, and did quite well against fitter, higher-ranked opponents. While they, too, might have pissfarted around as kids, they seemed to benefit from the early training.

    Gumby and NSLightsOut, does this accord with your experience at all?
    Umm...

    I haven't really rolled with too many people who started as kids. We've got one phenominal white belt down at St. Kilda at the moment who did some Judo when he was 11, but quit shortly thereafter, and only came back to grappling (BJJ) last year.

    Then again, my instructor has a 17/18 year old blue belt who started with him in his early teens who is apparently fantastic, and his own kids who've been rolling since early childhood roll better than many adults I've seen. Leonardo Viera (Leozinho), arguably the world's best competitive BJJer, started training at 6 years old, so there may be something to this.

    On the other hand, I've been told that the Gracie family generally start their kids off around 11-12, so there may be something to that too.
  3. IndoChinese is offline

    AKAKTK

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    Posted On:
    5/06/2006 11:38pm


     Style: Liu Seong Gung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    little ones like that need only gross motor coordination. basic strikes maybe.

    they love to tumble around and hit pads.

    their attention spans are very short, so you have to change the drill often, maybe six to twelve activities an hour.

    and if you dont like kids, you shouldnt be teaching them.

    it is easy to emotionally scar a kid.

    peace.
  4. Cassius is online now
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    Posted On:
    5/06/2006 11:44pm

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by IndoChinese
    it is easy to emotionally scar a kid.
    Actually, it's not. Kids are more emotionally resilient than most people realize.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  5. ojgsxr6 is offline

    Dorkus Malorkus

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    Posted On:
    5/06/2006 11:51pm

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     Style: Boxing/BJJudo/Crossfit

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Garbanzo Bean
    Actually, it's not. Kids are more emotionally resilient than most people realize.
    While it might not be easy to emotionally scar a child, it's definitely more fun.
  6. Doctor X is offline
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    ARGUMENTUM AD LATINUM DICTIONAIRUM

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    Posted On:
    5/07/2006 12:13am

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: Argumenta ad Rem

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    WE HAVE A WINNER!!

    Back when I started [Cue Sounds of Winter Winds Blowing through the Waste-Land--Ed.] training back when everyone trained on broken glass, I was a kid. This concept of being "forced" to come to a class is "foreign" to my understanding--it is what I wanted to do.

    Times change. Someone sweeps the dojo floor--"Hey! Who broke the damned glass and didn't clean up?!!"

    Classes need a "Dojo-Enforcer." As a kid, there were older serious kids who would be happy to let you know you were "wasting time" if you fucked around.

    I recently spent some time with one of my teachers who has started teaching kids. He is actually quite good at it, but he had me. "Heinrich Himmler" as he affectionately refer'd to me. Saw two kids fucking about--"push ups!" Soon, kids are in line. Workout happens. There is much rejoicing . . . at least from the Child Psychiatry community that will have to pick up the pieces.

    Nice to know I will be remembered as "the Bad Man in White!"

    Anyways, as I awake from my nasty reverie, my problem with parents is the unreasonable expectation as to what their Little Precious is going to learn. My teacher is quite clear--as are youse guys in your posts above. I must admit my brain reared up when I read "BJJ for Kids!" Man! I see you are teaching what kids need. So long as parents understand that, fine.

    I have a friend who does run a successful martial arts day-care. He fills a need. Some of the kinder graduate to more adult programs and stick with it. It can work--he has his "enforcers"--provided that the intent remains trying to teach the children something useful--discipline, concentration, exercise.

    --J. "Achtung!" D.
  7. IndoChinese is offline

    AKAKTK

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    Posted On:
    5/07/2006 12:24am


     Style: Liu Seong Gung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    'Actually, it's not. Kids are more emotionally resilient than most people realize.'

    nice bail.

    i disagree.

    maybe someone can cite us a study...

    and kids are alot more sensitive to people's attitudes than most think. they pick up on **** quick. last thing they need is a teacher who doesnt want to be there.
  8. NSLightsOut is offline
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    Posted On:
    5/07/2006 1:02am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by IndoChinese
    and kids are alot more sensitive to people's attitudes than most think. they pick up on **** quick. last thing they need is a teacher who doesnt want to be there.
    Definitely agree. The few times I've been preoccupied whilst teaching, or haven't really wanted to be there because I had something impending (due date for classwork or the like), the kids have picked up on it VERY quickly.
  9. alex is offline
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    STOP POSTING!

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    Posted On:
    5/07/2006 1:32am

    supporting member
     Style: Muay Thai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    emotional scarring is a healthy part of growing up when you are a martial artist. helps to breed that psychopathic disregard for life that is neccessary in this day and age.
  10. Truculent Sheep is offline

    KEIN HAAR APPROVED!

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    Posted On:
    5/07/2006 8:03am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by IndoChinese
    'Actually, it's not. Kids are more emotionally resilient than most people realize.'

    nice bail.

    i disagree.

    maybe someone can cite us a study...

    and kids are alot more sensitive to people's attitudes than most think. they pick up on **** quick. last thing they need is a teacher who doesnt want to be there.
    It really depends on the child on a case-by-case basis. A lot of parents just seem to think their kiddies are all generic clones and force them all to join the same clubs, have the same hobbies, sometimes even wear the same style of clothes...

    And we wonder why they go postal when they enter their teens.
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