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  1. Ragar is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Posts
    50

    Posted On:
    5/05/2006 10:15pm


     Style: Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Martial Arts Retreat Center

    I know some folks don't like Yang, Jwing Ming because they feel his life revolved around selling his books, etc. I actually met him some years ago and didn't feel that was the case but he certainly could have gotten caught up in the whole merchandising of his brand thing.

    I came across the site of a Martial Arts Retreat Center his organization is developing.
    I have to say the curriculum is the most comprehensive I have ever seen for a US school.

    http://www.ymaa-retreatcenter.org/en/curriculum

    Which is not to say that the training might not be weak in practice. I am not considering applying or anything, but I am interested to know if it bears any resemblance to China's state approved training regimin or to any of the degree programs in martial arts that people have posted about being able to earn in Asian countries.

    I'd also be curious to know if people thought this might be an effective course of study to pursue (note it includes firearms training, financial planning, language, cooking, etc). Has anyone tried to put together a similar program in that hasn't lived up to its promise on paper?

    It is interesting to note that they are only accepting students 17-22. I am a little wary that people that age can't come up with the money they are asking and wonder if people that age have the self-discipline to stick with such a program. (Though among the many erroroneous assumptions that statement makes about 17-22 years old is that all the candidates will be from the US.)

    I am also interested to know if folks here think that ages 17-27/32 are the peak years physically and mentally to devote to learning a martial arts lifestyle. I don't know the reasoning behind only accepting people in that age group, but I assumed it had something to do with being in a good place to learn and still have X years of good physical condition to teach others and presumably expand your knowledge.

    What makes me think this isn't a McDojo situation is that they say they will give you your money back at the end of the 10 year program so you can open your own school.

    They are also open about their budget and how much instructors are going to be paid a year which seems to be anti-McDojoish. Ten paying and 5 non-paying students will be chosen with the non-paying folks having to work 2-3 hrs a day to earn their keep. (They of course don't get any money at the end of the 10 yrs)

    The criteria of admission and questionarrie are right up there for people to see, too so you know what to expect.

    They also say that if there isn't anyone qualified to keep the program going, the center will serve as a resource. If there is someone interested in keeping it going, they will revamp the entire program design. The fact they acknowledge change is necessary presumably to keep the program relevant seems to be a good sign.

    Of course, after spending 10 years of their lives in the program, the grads may adopt a mindset that everything Grandmaster Yang did and said must be preserved and enshrined and everyone must eat, dress and sleep as he did.
  2. Shaolinz is offline
    Shaolinz's Avatar

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    Austin, TX
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    Posted On:
    5/05/2006 10:23pm


     Style: Muay Thai , BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    1. Knowing and Feeling Nature (Working in the Land)(400 Hrs)
    Overpriced, MA "college" complete with acting like a farm animal. I have a feeling if you invested 10 years into this program it would simply disappear by year 9 and leave with your money.
  3. Ronin.74 is offline

    霍氏八极拳徒弟

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    Dec 2005
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    2,467

    Posted On:
    5/05/2006 10:33pm


     Style: CMA,Muay Thai ,Yudo,TKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have seen some pretty intensive programs in China. But none included "Knowing and Feeling Nature", Horseback riding, Qigong Massage, Meditation, Cooking, or some of the other stuff being taught. I find it interesting with all the crap that they're offering that no training in Acupuncture is being offered. I would think that would be a more valuable skill than say, Knowing and Feeling Nature.

    And the pricing is outrageous. I guarantee that they are counting on no one making it past the first couple of years then they just get to pocket the money.
  4. Ragar is offline

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    Aug 2005
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    50

    Posted On:
    5/06/2006 3:22pm


     Style: Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronin.74
    And the pricing is outrageous. I guarantee that they are counting on no one making it past the first couple of years then they just get to pocket the money.
    I gotta think there are easier and more time tested ways to fleece people of their money than to buy real estate in California and construct a facility.

    In response to Shaolinz's comment, I would agree that perhaps they are a little too enamoured of the romantic notions of monastary life enobling one's soul. I had enough working the land as a kid to last me a life time and don't feel particularly enlightened or noble. (Though I do make a mean strawberry-rhubard pie)

    Normally I would say that small scale farming and herbal remedy training might not be a necessary skill for a person in this day and age. But if the doomsaying about an oil crisis impacting food transport turns out to be valid, it might not be a bad idea to know how to cultivate a little squash. Though this is really me editorializing on the world today rather than on the validity of the program.

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