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  1. albert is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2002 1:32am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hello all - this is my first post. Need some advice.

    I'm an incoming freshman at my college, and am thinking about joining their aikikai club. Aikikai is basically the original aikido style as promulgated by Ueshiba. There are more aggressive modern styles out there, but this is all that is offered in my area (in terms of aikido) so I will probably attend a few classes and try it.

    I've been exchanging emails with the secretary of the club. He's Japanese (maybe an int'l student?)- and his English is sort of hard to understand, but I've made out a few things. The instructor trained at "US West Aikikai" for 12 years. Guess that means out in California or something? Also, he seems real confident about the practicality of aikido.

    Can anyone testify to this? I would especially any aikidoka out there to post, and anyone who has trained/sparred/fought with aikidoka.

    I know I need to take classes and see for myself, and talk with the instructor/students and all that..but I just wanted some preliminary information if anyone has any.

    Thanks.
  2. PeedeeShaolin is offline
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    Posted On:
    8/20/2002 2:36am

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ, Karate,

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Whats up man? One of my best friends trained in Aikido for 16 years. He stopped because of a spinal injury he rcvd on his job. He said it was a very enjoyable practice. He had alot of fun with it.

    I really wouldnt suggest it for PRACTICAL use. And neither would he. But try it and see what you think. Just remember that not every instructors word is gold. Look at what youre taught honestly. Alot of things that are taught in the martial arts will never work the way we are TOLD they will work. If you just use your head a little from the start you'll be able to pick these techniques out pretty easily.

    "Do not become entranced by impractical or useless movements. Do not be categorized as one who "Learns all there is to know about less and less until he ends up learning everything there is to know about nothing." -Ed Parker
    "All warfare is based on deception." -Sun Tzu, ca. 400BC


    Reverse punch Kiaii!!!
  3. juji-gatame is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2002 3:09am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You're looking at alot of pratice with aiki ,but I think it's very practical ,I was a detention officer for several years, and used aiki techniques with great sucess as well as jujitsu techs.



    Edited by - juji-gatame on August 20 2002 03:10:29
  4. ruk is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2002 3:21am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Watch any Steven Seagal movie and you'll see what you can do when you train Akdio long enough and hard enough.

    There's a REASON why the UFC has banned most Akido moves.
  5. 9chambers

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2002 3:41am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Small joint manipulation is not legal in the UFC, that is true.
  6. Musashi83 is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2002 4:18am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I have trained it and I have come to the conclusion that it is not practical at all. Check it out for yourself but I wouldn't recomend it.,
  7. Gezere is offline
    Gezere's Avatar

    My guns bigger than Scrapper's!

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2002 4:48am

    supporting member
     Style: Kakutogi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The goal of Aikido really isn't to make one a fighter, it is BuDO after all. I think it is good in it helps you learn good flowing body movements which can be put to many different things. The Aikikai has a rep of being the TOFU TREE HUGGING type of MArtist looking for spirtual enlightment more than anything else (which is aikidos main goal anyways) However some newer Aikido schools are getting more and more practical while still using aiki principles, look into Tomiki Aikido. Better yet look into aikijutsu arts. Keep in mind these are battelfeild arts and dealt with more weaoponry and armor wearing so some adjustment would have to be made from the orginal waza for more practicality.

    Xiao Ao Jiang Hu Zhi Dong Fang Bu Bai (Laughing Proud Warrior Invinsible Asia) Emporer of Baji!!! THE FIRST LINE OF DEFENSE AGAINST THE UNITED AUSSIE FRONT!!
    ______
    Xiao Ao Jiang Hu Zhi Dong Fang Bu Bai (Laughing Proud Warrior Invincible Asia) Dark Emperor of Baji!!!

    RIP SOLDIER

    Didn't anyone ever tell him a fat man could never be a ninja
    -Gene, GODHAND

    You can't practice Judo just to win a Judo Match! You practice so that no matter what happens, you can win using Judo!
    The key to fighting two men at once is to be much tougher than both of them.
    -Daniel Tosh
  8. The Shooter is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2002 9:37am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "Watch any Steven Seagal movie and you'll see what you can do when you train Akdio long enough and hard enough."

    You are being sarcastic, right? Please don't tell me you actually think movie fight choreography is a good indicator of actual combat skill?

    As for my feeling on Aikido...

    Most of the Aikido players I have met here in the United States have been sad, pathetic, out of shape, pacifist nerds who swear up and down that Aikido is the most dangerous thing since the black plague. Because of this I have developed a very poor opinion on the state of Aikido in the United States. Perhaps it's different in Japan, but the Aikido practicioners I have met in my travels were strange, awkward, and look as if they couldn't fight their way out of a paper bag.
  9. gaijin is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2002 10:37am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    However some newer Aikido schools are getting more and more practical while still using aiki principles, look into Tomiki Aikido. Better yet look into aikijutsu arts.
    True, true. Most aikido styles are nothing more than harmonious fluff. However, Tomiki/Shodokan Aikido, as well as Yoseikan Aikido have each created a type of shiai, so practicing these styles will, in fact, give you a chance to go against fully resisting opponents. Most other schools - Aikikai, Ki Society, etc - rely only on cooperative training with a nonresistant partner. If that fulfills you, fine, but it will not suffice for self defense.

    I've studied Tomiki/Shodokan style for two years, and have managed to use it successfully on people outside of the dojo. However, I have unsuccessfully attempted it on trained grapplers. I managed to sneak in a few wrist locks on the ground, but never managed to throw them standing. So, as long as you don't plan on competing in MMA or NHB competitions, I'd say you'd be alright with Tomiki or Yoseikan, practically speaking.

    Also, I'm almost positive small joint locks were banned from UFC not because they feared those bastardly aikidokas, but because small joints consist mostly of cartilage, which does not heal after scarring.
  10. Amir is offline

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    Posted On:
    8/20/2002 11:50am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I am an Aikido practitioner, yet I believe most Aikido teachers do not teach it in the concept of self-defense and havenít a clue on how to teach for such a concept. But most doesn't equate all.

    Personally I study Korindo Aikido which is a totally separated M.A. which has developed independently out of the J.J.J. around the same time Ueshiba was developed (a bit later). Korindo Aikido is by nature a very practical M.A. and doesnít include most of the almost religious content Ueshiba placed in his Aikido. Yet, I wouldnít recommend my M.A. to anyone who is concentrated on the short range, it takes lots of years to become truly proficient in this art (similarly to other soft & sophisticated traditionally oriented M.A.). the techniques often seem just like Ueshiba Aikido techniques but having practiced the latter for a short while as well, I must say the difference in the details makes all the difference.

    Since my style is called Aikido, I have participated in several Aikikai seminars. I came to the above conclusion: most of them arenít even trying to teach a practical M.A.. Some only practice hand grabbing and often the attacker (Uke) is the more Harmonic and flowing then the defender (Tori). But not everyone is inefficient; a few of them are very good. Actually, these practical Aikidokaís often

    A couple of hint that could help you in your decision:
    * Ask and see if they practice techniques against an attacker using punches and kicks
    * Ask and see if they practice some form of free sparring.
    * Try checking if cooperation from the attacker is necessary or would they perform against a resisting opponent as well (donít check it with a beginner and remember you should remain unharmed at the end so they might be unable to finish the technique)
    * Are all practices just static or do they include dynamic practice as well (both practitioners move before the attack)
    * How long does it take to perform the technique when performed in normal speed (not trying to move as fast as possible)? If it takes forever and they move around several steps not practical in general.

    Naturally, these are only pointers, and at least some refer to the more advanced students. When practicing a new technique and/or principle or trying to improve a known one, advanced students may practice from a static hand grab. The question is do they practice the other forms as well?

    Amir
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