Page 2 of 4 First 1234 Last
  1. #11
    KhorneliusPraxx
    Guest
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Shard
    Is it at all possible to throw a decent kick[roundhouse] with the lead leg?

    Has anyone done this type of thing before? Are the twist mechanics the same as that of a orthodox stance?

    No...you will not have the power...but what you loose in power you make up with speed. It just depends on you situation.

    Swich Round Kick - Quickly shift your feet (not your body) and throw it quick.

    Short Skip Round Kick - Skipping forward almost like a side kick and coming around with you front leg...alot less power...primarily used to get around the a barrier, like there hips if they are stand sideways, and QUICKLY driving the toe of your shoe into their nuts.

    My favorite and most powerful...
    Step into it round Kick - Actually step your rear foot forward and off to the side as if you were running by them. Take care of the pivot as you step...thus when your foot plants down, have you heel point at them. As that Heel is planting the kicking leg can powerfully come around and blast the desired target.

  2. #12
    and good morning to you too supporting member
    PirateJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Location
    DC
    Posts
    3,240
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by LI GUY 1
    In boxing he said the large gloves require more power for knockouts and so power side back is neccessary to gain the extra power.
    riiiiiiiight... no one's ever been KO'd by a lead hand... :pancakebu

    Your left hook and jab are faster and more powerful than you right because you trained it to be that way. If you trained in a right lead mostly the opposite would be true. It's your thing...do what you want to do.
    correctomundo.
    You can't make people smarter. You can expose them to information, but your responsibility stops there.

  3. #13

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    23
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    However, if you have good lower body defense, eg. crane blocks, it can somewhat make up for it.

    As far as power, you still turn into it a bit. Just not much. That's one of the reasons Bruce Lee used his stronger leg as the lead. The majority of power comes from an understanding of body mechanics anyways.

  4. #14

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    340
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Thanks for the replies.
    Its not the hand techniques i'm worried about. I think i can land some decent hits with hands.
    I dunno why but i always seem to revert back to a side stance. So i figure i might as well try to make the most out of what i'm comfortable with.

  5. #15
    meng_mao's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Westford, MA
    Posts
    2,007
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Kengou
    It's also worth a note that Lee was also focused on street fighting. A straight on stance can be great for MMA but it leaves the groin exposed.
    When I think about this, it seems that
    side stance: you can roundkick to the balls easier.

    front stance: you can snapkick to the balls easier.

    Is there really an advantage?

  6. #16
    KhorneliusPraxx
    Guest
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by meng_mao
    When I think about this, it seems that
    side stance: you can roundkick to the balls easier.
    if you are trained to do so...
    Quote Originally Posted by meng_mao
    front stance: you can snapkick to the balls easier.
    EVERYONE on can do this...natural instinct...training helps but not neccesary
    Quote Originally Posted by meng_mao
    Is there really an advantage?
    Everyone vs. people trained to target the nutsack...which group is larger

  7. #17
    KhorneliusPraxx
    Guest
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Shard
    Thanks for the replies.
    Its not the hand techniques i'm worried about. I think i can land some decent hits with hands.
    I dunno why but i always seem to revert back to a side stance. So i figure i might as well try to make the most out of what i'm comfortable with.
    I think that you are confused to think that Bruce Lee thought everyone should fight with their strong side leading ALL THE TIME. We do equal reps of everything from both sides. Much of our foot work involves switching leads to so you can use the best tools for the situation you opponent gives you.

  8. #18
    Arbiter's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    614
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Side stance and strong-side-forward are really 2 different issues. although if you do have a side stance then you'd better fight with your strong side forward.

    Side stance is way too limiting, takes half your weapons at a time out of the game and is very vulnerable to takedowns and giving up your back. Is only practical for point sprarring imo.

    Strong side forward on the other hand can be a great tactic, some people can make it work really well, comes down to preference though.

  9. #19

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Posts
    23
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by meng_mao
    When I think about this, it seems that
    side stance: you can roundkick to the balls easier.

    front stance: you can snapkick to the balls easier.

    Is there really an advantage?
    Greater mobility, lighter on your feet, swifter kicks. If you can crane block, you can cover the groin anyways.

  10. #20
    meng_mao's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Westford, MA
    Posts
    2,007
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by ~SS2~
    Greater mobility, lighter on your feet, swifter kicks. If you can crane block, you can cover the groin anyways.
    I feel plenty mobile in a boxer's stance or even square on.

    What is a crane block?

Page 2 of 4 First 1234 Last

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Log in

Log in
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO