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  1. Cassius is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 1:45pm

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     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mjelva
    Must...learn...sweeps...

    Actually, sweeps is my #1 focus right now. I've practically stopped going for submissions from guard in order to improve my sweeps.
    Just remember that you can set sweeps up off of failed submissions, giving you something to go into besides more submissions.

    Sweeps are ridiculously important. They are your friend. Learn them. Love them. Tenderly.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  2. Mjelva is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 2:18pm


     Style: BJJ, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Garbanzo Bean
    Just remember that you can set sweeps up off of failed submissions, giving you something to go into besides more submissions.
    Really? Tell me more!
  3. Yrkoon9 is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 2:25pm

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     Style: 5.56

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    You know whats funny to do when someone can-opener's you?

    Throttle them.

    No kidding. It works. The old thumbs on the adams apple crush. Most of the time the can opener attempt is lame and you will both just sit there for a while. You throttling him. Him cranking you. You will have a sore neck. He won't be able to swallow easily.

    I put my finger right up their nose when they can opener me. Yup. I am an asshole. They let that **** go in a hurry though. They may even cry about it. No biggie. It just goes to show. You CAN pick your friends nose.
  4. Cassius is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 4:44pm

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     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Raynor
    Scissors guard for the win.
    Dammit, I was going to trademark that name a long time ago but I forgot. Rats.

    For Mjelva:

    Failed triangle setup ==> scissor sweep ==> push sweep ==> armdrag + push through with scissored knee to take back . . .

    Just an example. You could go butterfly or any other different open guard or transition to different submissions at pretty much all points.

    I think Aesopian has mentioned making a "techniques tree" before. It can be helpful if you know a lot of techniques but aren't good at remembering to string them together.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  5. Mjelva is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 6:03pm


     Style: BJJ, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Garbanzo Bean
    Dammit, I was going to trademark that name a long time ago but I forgot. Rats.

    For Mjelva:

    Failed triangle setup ==> scissor sweep ==> push sweep ==> armdrag + push through with scissored knee to take back . . .
    That's awesome.
    Generally, with me it looks something like this:

    Failed triangle setup ==> passed to halfguard ==> "how the **** do I sweep from here, again?"
    And then I either hold halfguard waiting for a lucky break, or let the guy pass to sidecontrol where I've actually got some game.
  6. Cassius is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 6:08pm

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     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Raynor
    Been taken apparantly. I'd never heard of it til around december when a teammate showed me how to rock the OTHER side of the guard. The basic series is cool, but when you combo the **** out of the basic series and then come out of nowhere with the omoplata, people start getting caught because many people at the white/blue level are only looking at the push, triangle, collar choke and scisor series and ignoring the arm control.
    Interesting. About the fanciest I've gotten with my scissor series is the reverse scissor (Yeah, I'm boring. Sue me.).

    Other than omoplata (which I often use as a sweep instead of just a sub) and kimura, my guard subs are kind of weak, though. I'd much rather sweep and then submit people from a more dominant position. Come to think of it, guard subs are probably the biggest weakness in my game right now. I really need to start trying to sub more from there. At the very least, it should make my sweeps less predictable.

    I love when random discussion about grappling points out a glaring weakness in my game. This is the most excited I've been all week.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  7. Cassius is online now
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    Posted On:
    3/17/2006 6:52pm

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     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Raynor
    The way I was taught, by a blue belt instructor in this case, so take it for what its worth to yoy, is that you lead in with your subs, as they end the fight immediately, and then combo off your subs into sweeps when they fail. For example, when using my scissor guard, ultimately my favorite move in there is the sweep. However, I'm gonna start with the triangle set up just in case I can get it and THEN sweep so I don't pass up any opportunities.
    No, this is definitely what I have been taught. I've just been completely slacking with submissions from the guard.

    I think what's been happening lately at least, is that I've had a shift of mind. At first, I was going for submissions, but keeping sweeps to combo off of them in mind. Then I started focusing heavily on sweeps just because I feel like I am pretty good at them. After that, it's probably become really easy to half-ass a sub because I know in the back of my head that I'm probably going for a sweep anyway.

    I'm being lazy, and I've been getting away with it. No more of that.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  8. NSLightsOut is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/18/2006 5:58am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mjelva
    Along with the usual constant guilliotine attempts, attempted americana locks from halfguard and trying to kill me with their guard.
    I resemble this remark. Only remove the attempts part. :eusa_snoo

    Quote Originally Posted by Raynor
    The way I was taught, by a blue belt instructor in this case, so take it for what its worth to you, is that you lead in with your subs, as they end the fight immediately, and then combo off your subs into sweeps when they fail.
    That depends greatly upon your preferences. I rate sweeping as a higher priority than submission, as it gets me top position in any scenario and racks up points in competition. However, if I see a submission opportunity, I'll go for it.

    At the moment, my main sweep of choice is the arm drag, which sets up a number of opportunities for submissions (armbar, triangle, collar choke, etc) when it fails. These things tend to go a number of ways, which is why I'm hesitant to create a personal 'techniques tree' as focusing on that may hinder the progress of my game in discovering new things.

    Quote Originally Posted by Garbanzo Bean
    Come to think of it, guard subs are probably the biggest weakness in my game right now. I really need to start trying to sub more from there. At the very least, it should make my sweeps less predictable.
    Lately I've been working open guard with feet on hips and elbows around my opponents armpits, which is fantastic for armdrags, armbars and triangles. It enables you to isolate arms with relative ease, and can really prove to be nasty for your opponent, especially with good lapel control in gi, and head control in no-gi. I wholeheartedly advise you to try it and see what you think.
  9. Mjelva is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/18/2006 9:44am


     Style: BJJ, Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Raynor
    The way I was taught, by a blue belt instructor in this case, so take it for what its worth to yoy, is that you lead in with your subs, as they end the fight immediately, and then combo off your subs into sweeps when they fail. For example, when using my scissor guard, ultimately my favorite move in there is the sweep. However, I'm gonna start with the triangle set up just in case I can get it and THEN sweep so I don't pass up any opportunities.
    That sounds like a really good idea.
    What sweeps would you work off a failed triangle, armbar, omoplata or other guard submission?
  10. Gumby is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/20/2006 1:11am


     Style: Brazilian Jiu Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Mjelva
    That sounds like a really good idea.
    What sweeps would you work off a failed triangle, armbar, omoplata or other guard submission?
    Whether you lead with submissions or sweeps is really a matter of preference- while submissions stand a chance of ending a fight, if you're the kind of fighter who is better on top than on the bottom, you may very well wish to sweep your opponent and get on top. Jiu jitsu is about doing what you can, not what you want.

    That being said, there are a few nice combo's you can use with your armbar triangle, and omoplata attempts. The most common ones I see are

    Armbar>triangle combo: often times your opponent tries to smash you to pull his arm out of an armbar- if he gets lazy while trying to escape his elbow and pulls his entire arm out from between your legs, you have the option of swinging your top leg (the one that would be over his face) back into a triangle attempt. See Jason Delucias first match with Royce Gracie for a perfect example of this transition.

    Failed triangles often lead to omoplata's in my experience, simply because of the nature of the position

    Omoplata's often lead to triangles when defended or sweeps if you manage to break your opponents posture down, but can not submit him (i.e. he rolls out).


    To be honost, one of the best submission combo's in my opinion is your basic X choke coupled with an armbar. My collar chokes from the guard are pretty non existent to the point that I dont recall ever even attempting a basic X choke in a tournament. In the gym, however, I've had good success as using the X choke to set up the armbar. By insisting on the choke, your opponent is forced to push himself up to get posture to defend. In doing so, he gives you his arm for a possible armbar. The beauty of this submission is that once you've got good hip movement, you dont need to release the choke hold in order to switch to the armbar. This has worked quite well for me on one of the large brown belts I train with and as I said my collar chokes suck- if you've got strong grips, you might find this game to be your cup of tea.
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