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  1. parthenon is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/23/2006 1:24am


     Style: Hung Ga Gung Fu + Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Getting around the stiff arm

    Hey all. Whenever I do randori against bigger opponents I can never get in close enough to pull off a technique cause those bastards just keep on stiff arming me! What do you usually do to get around the stiff arm? Any help at all is much appreciated!!
  2. Stick is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/23/2006 1:28am

    hall of famestaff
     Style: MMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Flying arm bar.

    Or, you could, you know, shoot for the legs.
  3. Locu5 is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/23/2006 1:39am

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     Style: Alliance BJJ (Blue)

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Use the gi to throw on a wristlock and take the back.
  4. MONGO is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/23/2006 1:55am

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    ^ the above tecniques are not really a help to Judo specific situations (except the flying armbar, that is pure sweetness).

    When some on stiff arms you in Judo, I find that if you use ashi waza to unbalance they may bend their arm but it depends on what kind of player you are fighting.

    Good ashiwaza player with quick feet- grab the gi above the elbow and quickly/sharply pull the elbow so it forces a bend, this coupled with pushing your chest closer will force a bend.

    Switch to an lapel grip (inside the arm grip underneath theirs) and force the arm to bend as I pull them into an Uchimata.

    Bent over/pick up player that straight arms you is waiting for you to sweep so they can single leg or double leg you- in that case I pull the straight arm with the opposite side hand and take the grip to a high behind the neck and push them sideways, good for Kosoto Gake/Gari, near leg Uchimata or Tani Otoshi.
  5. Stick is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/23/2006 1:59am

    hall of famestaff
     Style: MMA

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Can't recall the Japanese name, but isn't their a judo technique that is close to double legging? IIRC it innvolves dropping down, closing in, and taking the legs.
  6. nerveasian is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/23/2006 2:23am


     Style: Getting mounted

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Morote Gari ("two hand reap") is the judo terminology for a shot.

    I usually find that if someone's stiff-arming me, it means that I'm not pulling their arm hard enough to achieve good kuzushi. A good tight grip on the bottom seam of the gi sleeve and an explosive backward/upward pull has never failed me in overcoming the stiffest of arms.
  7. MONGO is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/23/2006 2:30am

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dai Tenshi
    Can't recall the Japanese name, but isn't their a judo technique that is close to double legging? IIRC it innvolves dropping down, closing in, and taking the legs.
    Yeah its morote gari but a double leg when getting a judo stiff arm will get you choked out because of the gi. I'm not knocking on the double leg but its bad when new guys start to rely upon it instead of actually learning to grip fight and break the other person's balance. Double legs also have a bad tendency to not work well on experienced Judoka (my experience)

    And nerveasian, the danger of snapping your body back is your movement can be capitalized on because it somes very close to breaking your own balance.
    Last edited by MONGO; 3/23/2006 2:34am at .
  8. Locu5 is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/23/2006 2:34am

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     Style: Alliance BJJ (Blue)

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Is the same choke concern there for taking a single leg on the same side as the stiffarm?
  9. MONGO is offline

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    Posted On:
    3/23/2006 2:39am

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    Depends on what you are doing with your other arm, if you take both arms off to do the single, yes it can be.
    The stiff arm by a bigger player keeps you away and would make the single leg or double leg start from farther away without breaking the grip. The best bet would be to concentrate on breaking the grip and then go for what ever you want as a takedown into newaza or favorite technique.
  10. parthenon is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/23/2006 2:49am


     Style: Hung Ga Gung Fu + Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Going for the legs is a good idea but wouldn't help me improve my Judo techniques though. I always think about doing it whenever I get frustrated in randori. Thanks for the suggestions keep em coming!!!
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