224956 Bullies, 3416 online  
  • Register
Our Sponsors:

Results 51 to 60 of 82
Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst ... 23456 789 LastLast
Sponsored Links Spacer Image
  1. BackFistMonkey is offline
    BackFistMonkey's Avatar

    Actual Photo

    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Dayton
    Posts
    8,285

    Posted On:
    3/04/2006 6:31pm

    supporting member
     Style: Recovery-Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Psychedelic
    I'm logging off....
    Does anyone else need a cigerette ?
    Quote Originally Posted by Bodhi108 View Post
    Nuke a unborn gay whale for Christ.
    I don't mean to sound bitter, cold, or cruel, but I am, so that's how it comes out.
    BILL HICKS,
    1961-1994
  2. crowey is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    May 2002
    Location
    bristol/falmouth UK
    Posts
    372

    Posted On:
    3/04/2006 6:49pm


     Style: Kung Fu/TKD/MMA n00b

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Psychedelic
    I'm already owned, by who you?
    Right!
    First I come at you nice, you're a jerk, I complain politely,
    you say I'm whining, so I decide to be an asshole back and
    now you are the one whining.
    What a couple of fags!!!
    complaining politely is calling them "typical bullshido assholes"? that's polite?
    jeeez, maybe I'm just too damn brittish for my own good.

    that aside. you're a dick.
  3. Hammer Fist is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Parts Unknown
    Posts
    72

    Posted On:
    3/05/2006 11:57am


     Style: Intergalactic

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Psychedelic
    you might want to grab a dictionary you two idiots and look up the difference between complain and whine... you illiterate ****-nut!!!!
    If you're going to infer that others have an inadequate grasp of the english language, you should have the common sense to avoid grammatically incorrect sentences. Your insult/barb should read as follows:

    You two idiots may want to grab a dictionary and look up the difference between the words complain and whine, you illiterate ****-nuts!!!


    Aaaah . . . much better. Oh, and shielded head gear is for motorcyclists and American Gladiator contestants. Finally, yes, you do come off as a whiner and, even though I'm pretty new to this site, even I can see that you posted in the wrong forum.
  4. WunHungLo is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    NJ
    Posts
    170

    Posted On:
    3/05/2006 2:06pm


     Style: Jujutsu, freestyle Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I also need some advice about kenpo armor. Sometimes, when one of the other girls in my dojo taps me with a heavily padded hand, I begin sobbing. Is there a headgear that can absorb my tears, too? Not that I'm ashamed, since the rest of the class cries, too. This IS shorinji kenpo, after all.
    Also, all the groin protectors I've seen are MUCH too large for a kenpo practitioner.
    My sensei also has this problem, and he has even tried children's sizes. One of my dojo-mates found a suitable eyepatch to use, but the store was out when I went to get mine.
    I'm also trying to find softer mats. The judo-style mats we have are way too hard. My feet begin to hurt if I stand on them for more than 5 minutes. One time, sensei made us do some sit-ups. We were all in pain for the rest of the week! One of the tougher guys in class even did a pushup on them, though. And that was on his KNUCKLES!

    Please just help me, and don't be mean. I'm running out of tears(and testosterone).
  5. UpaLumpa is offline
    UpaLumpa's Avatar

    Exasperated.

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Descending into absurdity
    Posts
    6,977

    Posted On:
    3/06/2006 2:59pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "Alright, so I took everyone's advise and looked into Muay Thai gear, and you're right, that **** is made for real use! I am now going to be purchasing a Muay Thai chest/body guard from Twins, and a Muay Thai/Boxing headgard from Fight Gear. "

    General "LOL" at the idea of sparring while wearing MT chest guards.
    Do you have any idea what those are for?
  6. FictionPimp is offline

    Sexiest Punching Bag Alive

    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    2,147

    Posted On:
    3/07/2006 11:30am


     Style: BJJ/Judo/Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    A had a acident where a a guy hurt my ribs while performing a takedown and another a day later with a armbar attempt where the guy landed flat on my chest with his ass. After which I had a nice welt on my rib and pain so bad I had to sleep sitting up. I went to the doctor (though maybe I broke a rib or two, you guys probably seen my whine on the forums) and found out I only poped the rib out of place. They put it back, pain went mostly away. I'm still in pain, doing a lot of crunches, or a lot of pressure on my ribs hurts bad.

    My doctor recomended a chest guard. I couldn't stop laughing. I can just picture myself dressed up like a tank while trying to do judo or bjj. Moral of the story. I'll stick to my cup and some moderate pain now and again.
  7. Psychedelic is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Northeast L.A.
    Posts
    41

    Posted On:
    3/07/2006 3:57pm


     Style: Kenpo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    http://cgi.ebay.com/TWINS-Muay-Thai-...QQcmdZViewItem

    The above link is to an ebay auction for the body protector that I am NOW thinking of getting. As you can see, it is designed for the fighters to wear, not the coach, like many other "muay thai" body-guards. If the link doesn't work, copy-and-paste it. But take a look, it looks pretty good to me.
  8. UpaLumpa is offline
    UpaLumpa's Avatar

    Exasperated.

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    Descending into absurdity
    Posts
    6,977

    Posted On:
    3/07/2006 3:59pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Your stupidity rating has decreased then.
    Your lame index remains high.
  9. Psychedelic is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Northeast L.A.
    Posts
    41

    Posted On:
    3/07/2006 4:18pm


     Style: Kenpo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Hey all,
    The following is an excerpt from an article I found on the National Parkinson Foundation website. I will give the link to the rest of the articel, should anyone be interested in reading more of it, at the end of the excerpt. ANYONE WHO READS THIS ARTICLE AND STILL RIDICULES ME FOR SEAKING PROTECTIVE GEAR IS AN IDIOT!!!! And I ask you, how many times have you been hit in the head in the last month? Well, that explains your attitude!!! Read on...

    Boxing and Parkinson Disease

    by Dr. Ira Casson

    "Dementia pugilistica" and "punch drunk." These terms have been brought to the public's attention and renewed interest in the long-term effects of boxing on the brain. Public statements by various experts, however, have clouded rather than clarified the issue. This article will review the literature on the topic.

    The term "chronic encephalopathy" or "chronic brain injury" of boxers encompasses a wide spectrum of disorders. At one end are boxers with minimal involvement and at the other end are severely affected boxers requiring institutional care. Along the spectrum are some boxers with varying degrees of speech difficulty, stiffness, unsteadiness, memory loss, and inappropriate behavior. The more severely affected boxers gave rise to labels such as "punch drunk".

    In different studies, 15-40% of ex-boxers have been found to have symptoms of chronic brain injury. Most of the boxers have mild symptoms. Recent work, employing detailed psychological testing and MRI scanning, has shown that most professional boxers (even those without symptoms) have some degree of brain damage. Although obviously symptomatic cases still occur, they are less common today probably because today's boxers have fewer bouts and shorter careers, resulting in fewer blows to the head and less cumulative brain injury.

    Onset of Symptoms
    Symptoms usually begin near or shortly after the end of a boxer's career. On occasion they are first noticed after a particularly hard bout. Symptoms develop an average of 16 years after beginning the sport, although some cases have occurred as early as 6 years after becoming a boxer. Symptoms have been reported in boxers as young as 25 years of age. Although the disorder has been reported in amateurs, it is more common in professionals. It can occur in all weight classes but is seen most often in the heavier divisions, and champion boxers run as much risk of sustaining chronic brain injury as less skilled journeymen.

    Recent work has demonstrated that MRI abnormalities and minimal memory deficits occur in many boxers who appear normal. These minimal deficits can begin after only a few years in the sport. While boxers with less than 20-30 professional bouts usually do not have any symptoms of brain injury those with 25-50 bouts often show MRI and psychological test abnormalities without obvious symptoms. Boxers with more than 50 professional bouts often have obvious symptoms of brain injury as well as MRI and psychological test abnormalities.

    This continuum of symptoms strongly suggests that the chronic encephalopathy of boxers is a progressive illness. The older literature contains numerous case reports that document a progressive deterioration, even after the boxer had retired from the ring. The Parkinson-like disorder is as progressive as the other forms.

    As the damage accumulates, minimal symptoms merge gradually into more obvious symptoms. The boxer usually is not aware of his difficulties; his wife is often the first to notice subtle personality changes. Extreme intolerance of alcoholic beverages is a common symptom in the early stages. Confrontations with law enforcement authorities are often the result of lost social inhibitions or sudden changes in mood and behavior. These difficulties usually are explained away as symptoms of depression, anxiety, or even the enthusiasm of an immature aging athlete. An example of such behavior is the ex-heavyweight champion Mike Tyson.

    Early motor symptoms usually are noticed first by the trainer. A mild lack of coordination, subtle loss of balance, or a generalized "slowing down" initially are attributed to the natural aging process. However, as these symptoms worsen, it may become apparent to the boxer's companions that something is wrong, even while the boxer continues to insist that he is perfectly healthy.

    Types of Disorders
    Critchley, the great English neurologist describe 4 types of disorder in former boxers:

    A disorder similar to general paresis (syphilis of the brain) but without syphilis
    A disorder similar to multiple sclerosis
    A disorder similar to Alzheimer disease
    A disorder similar to Parkinson disease
    Martland first described a Parkinson disorder in a former boxer in 1928. During the next 40 years, 20 or more boxers showing Parkinson symptoms were described. In 1969, Roberts published a study of 250 British former boxers, of whom 224 were available for examination. The boxers received neurologic examinations and electroencephalograms (EEGs). 37 (17%) had evidence of brain damage that was attributed to boxing; 13 were severely affected.

    Two major disorders were reported:

    A Parkinson disorder with tremor; rigidity; slowness of movements; stooped posture and masked faces
    A multiple sclerosis like disorder with an unsteady gait, tremor, and in-coordination
    Speech difficulty was characteristic of both disorder and was present in almost all cases. The slurred speech had characteristics of the speech of Parkinson, multiple sclerosis, and stroke victims. Roberts also showed a relationship between the length of the boxer's career, the number of professional bouts, and the prevalence of brain injury. 47% of those whose careers exceeded 10 years were affected, compared with 13% of those who fought for less than five years. Half of the group who had more than 150 professional bouts showed symptoms of brain damage compared with 19% of those with 50 to 150 professional bouts and 7% of those who fought less than 50 times.

    Roberts (unfortunately) did not focus on higher intellectual functioning or psychiatric disturbances. In the same year, however, Johnson reported 4 types of psychiatric disturbances in former boxers:

    (1) A disorder with severe memory impairment
    (2) A dementia
    (3) A disorder with a progressive disorganization of personality and intellectual function
    (4) A disorder with delusions, violent rage, and morbid jealousy including repeated accusations of infidelity

    Most boxers had more than one disorder.

    (--END OF EXCERPT--)

    Here's that link (should you want to read the rest of it):
    http://www.parkinson.org/site/pp.asp...JLPwB&b=164717
    You will need to scroll down from the top of the page a bit, it starts a little ways down the page.
    Anyway,
    I hope this explains my position somewhat better, now that
    I've had time to "cool off".
    I believe that as far as this kind of thing goes, MMA fighters are every bit as likely to have trouble, if not more!!! Remember, boxing uses 10-14 Oz. gloves...
    UFC only uses 4 Oz. gloves. So the risk may be even higher for MMA!!!
    My point: protect yourself!!! And anyone who seeks to put me down for doing so is a fool!!! THE EVIDENCE IS OVERWHELMING!!!
    Cheers,
    -Psychedelic
  10. Lu Tze is offline

    BJJ might make you a better ground fighter, but Judo will make you a better dancer.

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    W. Yorks, UK
    Posts
    5,018

    Posted On:
    3/07/2006 4:30pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's better to live an hour as a lion than a lifetime as a worm.
    Quote Originally Posted by Psychedelic
    I believe that as far as this kind of thing goes, MMA fighters are every bit as likely to have trouble, if not more!!! Remember, boxing uses 10-14 Oz. gloves...
    UFC only uses 4 Oz. gloves. So the risk may be even higher for MMA!!!
    My point: protect yourself!!! And anyone who seeks to put me down for doing so is a fool!!! THE EVIDENCE IS OVERWHELMING!!!
    Cheers,
    -Psychedelic
    Gloves are designed to protect the hands not the head you numbnuts. Boxers can punch harder because they have bigger gloves, thus their risk of injury is much greater.
Page 6 of 9 FirstFirst ... 23456 789 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

Powered by vBulletin™© contact@vbulletin.com vBulletin Solutions, Inc. 2011 All rights reserved.