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  1. #151

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaiboxerken
    It seems that every martial art is TMA to you. Your definition loses all meaning when it doesn't give a person any idea of what kind of martial art you're talking about.
    Are you saying that Muay Thai that is well over 100 years old isn't Traditional?

    Are you saying that Kyokoshin isn't traditional.

    Are you saying that Wu Shu which started post 1950 is traditional?

    Damn maybe you should figure it out kid.

  2. #152
    Torakaka's Avatar
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    I thought the sport of muay thai, as it's known today, has only been around since the early 20th century?
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm

  3. #153
    Thaiboxerken's Avatar
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    What's the time requirement to be considered "traditional"?

  4. #154

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    That's what I'm asking you.


    ..........

    BTW I never said Muay Thai Kickboxing KidS I said Muay Thai.

  5. #155
    It is Fake's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaiboxerken
    What's the time requirement to be considered "traditional"?
    Doesn't matter. In your response you aren't using a Time frame. Technically TKD is a Modern MA, yet, it is considered TMA.

    That is why your argument is flawed.

  6. #156
    Thaiboxerken's Avatar
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    Maybe the problem is that it has not much to do with how long a martial arts been around, but has more to do with why some arts train like they do. I consider a TMA a system that trains and does things only because tradition calls for it, a TMA is static and doesn't change with new information or to evolve. This is why I don't consider Muay Thai a "TMA", it's adopted boxing because boxing works. BJJ is constantly changing as well.

    What I consider TMA are systems who are represently largly by mcdojo schools that do kata for kata's sake and grasp onto tradition as if it's the only thing keeping their art alive.

  7. #157

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaiboxerken
    Maybe the problem is that it has not much to do with how long a martial arts been around, but has more to do with why some arts train like they do. I consider a TMA a system that trains and does things only because tradition calls for it, a TMA is static and doesn't change with new information or to evolve. This is why I don't consider Muay Thai a "TMA", it's adopted boxing because boxing works. BJJ is constantly changing as well.

    What I consider TMA are systems who are represently largly by mcdojo schools that do kata for kata's sake and grasp onto tradition as if it's the only thing keeping their art alive.
    So now we've come full circle and arrived back at you asking why forms/katas are utilized.

  8. #158

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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaiboxerken
    Maybe the problem is that it has not much to do with how long a martial arts been around, but has more to do with why some arts train like they do. I consider a TMA a system that trains and does things only because tradition calls for it, a TMA is static and doesn't change with new information or to evolve. This is why I don't consider Muay Thai a "TMA", it's adopted boxing because boxing works. BJJ is constantly changing as well.

    What I consider TMA are systems who are represently largly by mcdojo schools that do kata for kata's sake and grasp onto tradition as if it's the only thing keeping their art alive.
    :jerk: Finally we're getting somewhere. I may not agree with your translation but yes, these schools are crap and should be treated as such. I would not define this as much as traditional (Shaolin monks have been observed learning boxing while training for fights) as much as stupid and cultish.

  9. #159
    JohnnyCache's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Thaiboxerken
    Maybe the problem is that it has not much to do with how long a martial arts been around, but has more to do with why some arts train like they do. I consider a TMA a system that trains and does things only because tradition calls for it, a TMA is static and doesn't change with new information or to evolve. This is why I don't consider Muay Thai a "TMA", it's adopted boxing because boxing works. BJJ is constantly changing as well.

    What I consider TMA are systems who are represently largly by mcdojo schools that do kata for kata's sake and grasp onto tradition as if it's the only thing keeping their art alive.

    Well then you are using TMA interchangably with SMA (shitty martial arts) and that's not always the case.

    To me, a TMA is a martial art where some nod to the culture of origin is still made in class and some lineage to past instructors is tracked. You could consider boxing a TMA - it has a longer and straighter, better recorded lineage and cultural position in the USA then many asian arts do in their countries.

    a 'school where we wear mismatched asian **** and use cheap tin weapons that were never used in history to do **** that never worked in any context, ever, and is mostly just made up **** from the 70s when shifu watched enter the dragon" is an SMA school. They aren't really traditional - they have no real grounding in history and their past, which is one reason they suck. Those schools aren't "traditional martial arts" any more then a gettysburg recreation is "traditional military training"

    Take BJJ - you could make a case that BJJ is "traditional" because the sense of lineage and ryu loyalty and the rabid perservation of the fighting standard are there, as is the respect for the early generations of the style. . .
    Last edited by JohnnyCache; 3/07/2006 10:12pm at .


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