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  1. daigoro is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    San Antonio, TX
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    Posted On:
    4/02/2006 11:40pm


     Style: MT (no, not "empty")

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Khun Kao
    Sorry for dragging up this old thread, but I finally remembered to ask my Thai coach regarding question #1....

    Cornermen lift their fighters up (with his arms up in the air) to open up his lungs (as I suggested), but to also 'stretch' their muscles back out. The typical Thai stance is slightly crouched (though not as much as Boxing), and lifting them up stretches them back out....
    Is that the same reason they do the "lean back against the ropes" thing?
  2. supercrap is offline
    supercrap's Avatar

    Founder/GrandSensei of Joint British / Papua New Guinean Non-contact Lawn Bowls Jiu Jitsu Committee

    Join Date
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    Least Cool Guy in all of Japan
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    Posted On:
    4/02/2006 11:42pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Much obliged! I've been eating at a Thai restaurant lately that shows muay thai all day long, so the question was in my mind again.

    Thanks for the info.
    Imports from Japan, Shipping Worldwide! Art Junkie, Scramble, BJJ Spirits, Reversal...
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  3. Khun Kao is offline

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    Join Date
    May 2003
    Location
    Washington, D.C.
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    638

    Posted On:
    4/03/2006 7:14am


     Style: MuayThai

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by daigoro
    Is that the same reason they do the "lean back against the ropes" thing?
    The lean back against the ropes thing, in my experience, is for 2 reasons. Yes, for one it does help you stretch your back out. But the other reason is that you are testing how tight and/or loose the ropes are. This can play an important part of your ring strategy. Some fighters will back into the ropes, and lean away from strikes, then use the "springiness" from the ropes to catapault them back forward, adding a little extra "oomph" to their counterstrikes....

    Its also important for just plain defense. Think about Muhammed Ali's "Rope-a-Dope" fight. He used how loose the ropes were to his advantage. He would not have been able to employ those tactics if the ropes had been taut.

    When I fight, I prefer the ropes to be pulled taut. It helps my game a lot since the majority of the time, the clinch ends up against the ropes.
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