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  1. #41
    Cassius's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by FictionPimp
    knee on stomach to clock choke is one of my favorite submissions.
    Knee on belly to baseball bat choke is pretty good. There's often a biceps cutter from there that people seem to not see coming.

    But I think UpaLumpa was referring to tapping someone just from the pressure of knee on belly.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal

  2. #42

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    Quote Originally Posted by The Vagrant
    switching to BJJ might not be a bad idea, im tired of explaining to the instructors that a RNC is a choke, not a neck crank and asking what **** would work without teh gi.
    Considering that the RNC is a legal judo technique and is shown in Kano's book, that's not a good sign.

  3. #43

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    I always get guys rolling over on me and giving me their backs when I go knee on belly, but yea the baseball bat choke is another favorite of mine from there. I've never tried to hold the position really long, I just use it for the reaction and go for something (9 out of 10 times i'm trying for an armbar and end up with them rolling and I take their back.)

    But, thats what I love about being a white belt, all these new things you learn every single day. Knee on belly is the coolest position I ever learned once I actually learned how to get there properly.

  4. #44
    jnp's Avatar
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    warning: ego-whorrific post

    Quote Originally Posted by Tourettes
    Yeah, how's about that newbie "I'm beating this blackbelt! I rule!" attitude. Everyone goes through it. When you're new, you think damn, I'm doing great, until you see that senior you played turn it up a few degrees when they play their peers and then if you have any sense, you understand that they're being nice to you so you can learn.

    In my dojos, you give the lower rank one chance to "win" and to work on being an offenseive player.
    I rolled with a white belt last week, and, after repeatedly attaining S-mount, I let him roll me off because I'm bored with my usual subs. After practice I heard him bragging about how good he was at escaping from me. I had a little Yrkoon9 moment where I silently promised him his just rewards next week.

    Last night I subbed him over and over from S-mount, but only after holding him there for a few minutes and letting him flop like a fish. Another white belt I roll with frequently has blue belt level legs and hips when you try to pass his guard. I play with him a lot because he is damn good at the armbar and omoplata setup. I do this to work my defense and his offense. Last night I passed his guard every time in less than 15 seconds.

    Long story short, a few of the white belts came up to me after practice and asked if I was mad at them. I said no, I just wasn't in the mood to play and that I felt like working my offense that night. They asked me to tell them beforehand next time I felt like that.

    I find it boring to crush the junior belts over and over. I find I learn more if I let them work moves as long as their technique doesn't suck. Basically I capitalize on their mistakes to negatively reinforce bad habits.[/ego-trip]

    That said, I'm pretty sure I have never actually worked a move on my instructor that he didn't let me have.
    Shut the hell up and train.

  5. #45
    Cassius's Avatar
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    I still remember the first BJJ class in which I got to roll. I tried to get a BJJ black belt off of my chest by bench pressing him. What a riot that must have been to everyone else.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal

  6. #46
    UpaLumpa's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jnp
    They asked me to tell them beforehand next time I felt like that.
    Once one of our best purples (now brown) decided to turn it on on me. I'd always known he was tempering himself against me but damn it was one of the most painful things I've ever experienced.

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by UpaLumpa
    Once one of our best purples (now brown) decided to turn it on on me. I'd always known he was tempering himself against me but damn it was one of the most painful things I've ever experienced.
    Painful ego-wise or body-wise? I try to never injure my training partners. This means applying the subs slowly and with control. I might get the setup quickly, but I slow down once position is established. I'm not saying the brown did this to you, just stating my viewpoint.

    If you're being a total dick while training I might sweep you onto your face though.
    Shut the hell up and train.

  8. #48

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zing!
    Considering that the RNC is a legal judo technique and is shown in Kano's book, that's not a good sign.
    Are all the players doing the RNC as a crank or just the one blackbelt?

    Sounds like you have an agenda and that's great but many people in judo don't share that agenda and you have to accept that. Play judo at judo practice. If you want no gi, figure it out on your own or head to the no gi bjj practices.

    Also, a lot of chokes in judo double as neck cranks. The mentality is often that if the ref didn't see it you didn't do it. and this can be manifested in some extreme ways at times. I'm not saying to wreck your training partners, not at all, but that you should be aware that it can happen and be prepared for it instead of being caught unawares.

    Crushing whitebelts does get boring - you only do that with the ones who come in with or develop the big egos. And sooner or later, it happens with and to everyone. There's always someone better than you and hopefully, there's a equality of give + take for both. But to have some whitebelts come up to you after practice and ask if you're mad at them - huh? Tell them beforehand that you're going to up the intensity? They couldn't take being steamrolled for one night?

  9. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tourettes
    But to have some whitebelts come up to you after practice and ask if you're mad at them - huh? Tell them beforehand that you're going to up the intensity? They couldn't take being steamrolled for one night?
    Meh. I'm normally very laid back with white belts on the mat. They aren't used to me actively pursuing submissions against them. Usually I just 'lie in wait' for them to make errors. I'll often let them pass my guard, get me in side or whatever. This way I can work my escapes/sweeps and they get to work on their offense.

    My attitude is that the quicker you get good, the better a training partner you'll become for myself and for the dojo. IME, people get better faster when you let them work good technique and either point out their bad habits or sweep/sub/whatever when they make bad positional decisions.
    Shut the hell up and train.

  10. #50

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    Quote Originally Posted by jnp
    Meh. I'm normally very laid back with white belts on the mat. They aren't used to me actively pursuing submissions against them. Usually I just 'lie in wait' for them to make errors. I'll often let them pass my guard, get me in side or whatever. This way I can work my escapes/sweeps and they get to work on their offense.

    My attitude is that the quicker you get good, the better a training partner you'll become for myself and for the dojo. IME, people get better faster when you let them work good technique and either point out their bad habits or sweep/sub/whatever when they make bad positional decisions.
    You make good points. I've just never encountered folks going up to other people in the dojo, complain about the intensity and ask for warnings concerning someone's mood after they've played them. If you didn't physically get hurt, let it go until the next session.

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