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  1. NSLightsOut is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/23/2006 5:49am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm trying to imagine how one could wristlock from here, and I'm failing.

    Please share the technique
  2. Red Elvis is offline
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    Da Komrads... Again you are MadPelvisOwn3d!

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    Posted On:
    2/23/2006 10:17pm

    supporting member
     Style: Spetsnaz Shovel-Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ****, my problem has always been the opposite. Typically people are bigger and stronger then me so I am used to relying on my speed and technique. There is also plenty of room for me to move around them. The people who give me the most problems ironically are guys my size and speed. Not used to dealing with people as fast as me and it turns into a friggen cat fight blur of action. Good for the 'ol cardio though.

    As for the push on the hips escape. Easily solved when they tuck in their legs or grapevine.

    Quote Originally Posted by Garbanzo Bean
    The best grappling compliment I've ever recived was from a purple belt at another school that said that I "rolled like a little guy." .
    I'm offended! :icon_mad:

    But in all seriousness I had a instructor who could and did play all games. He also tought what worked best for your size and style which was awesome. Have never found that since. It was funny wathcing him roll because he was always just a little better than the guy he was with. One minute you'd see him with a blue and think "man, is that all he's got". Then you'd see him with another black and he'd still just barely be ahead. But he was always ahead whether playing light and fast against a purple or big and strong against a black. Weird.
    Last edited by Red Elvis; 2/23/2006 10:37pm at .
    .
    :icon_twis
    .

    To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence;
    Supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without spilling your Guinness.
    Sun "Fu Man JhooJits" Tzu, the Art of War & Guinness
  3. Shawarma is online now

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    Posted On:
    2/23/2006 10:33pm


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Question: Has anyone had any experience with somebody so huge and powerful they barely needed technique and thus had problems learning finesse in their techniques? How did they work around it?
  4. Red Elvis is offline
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    Da Komrads... Again you are MadPelvisOwn3d!

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    Posted On:
    2/23/2006 10:39pm

    supporting member
     Style: Spetsnaz Shovel-Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Shawarma
    Question: Has anyone had any experience with somebody so huge and powerful they barely needed technique and thus had problems learning finesse in their techniques? How did they work around it?
    Yes and I don't know. The guy ripped my collar bone from my sternum and after I came back from months of healing and no training he was gone. Fucker... :confused1
    .
    :icon_twis
    .

    To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence;
    Supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without spilling your Guinness.
    Sun "Fu Man JhooJits" Tzu, the Art of War & Guinness
  5. Cassius is offline
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    Posted On:
    2/23/2006 10:55pm

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Shawarma
    Question: Has anyone had any experience with somebody so huge and powerful they barely needed technique and thus had problems learning finesse in their techniques? How did they work around it?
    Yes, I fought a guy like that in the last tournament and I don't think he has ever bothered to learn much technique. 6'6"+ and weighed in at 333. KhorneliusPraxx saw him. I weighed in at 243 for the tourney, and he literally grabbed both sides of my collar, picked me up by them, and threw me down. The guy that faced him after actually got backmounted on him, but Gojira just smothered him. It was disturbing.

    He ended up just forcing my body to the mat and getting a kimura.

    Hence my recent obsession with improving my bottom game.

    On the other hand, a guy that weighed about 400 pounds used to train at our school, and he actually had fairly good technique for his size. He was pretty gentle.

    For me, learning good technique has always been a result of me asking myself "Can I do what I'm doing right now for the next 20 minutes, or will my muscles tire out from it?" For the basic game, if the answer is "I'm going to get really tired," then I try to relax, stop using strength, and pick a better option.
    "No. Listen to me because I know what I'm talking about here." -- Hannibal
  6. Camus is offline
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    Office Drone

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    Posted On:
    2/23/2006 11:54pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I don't know that there's anything horribly wrong with using alotta strength in rolling, so long as you've the stamina to keep using it for awhile and you work low intensity also to keep up your technique.

    In fact, one of the problems I've had is going too soft most of the time. Then just last night I was rolling relatively light with one of our blue belts about my weight (although stocky rather than lean) and we turned it up about 20 times, I latched onto my armlock (trademark move) when he went to his side, rolled him over and threw my leg over for kimura. Before the guy even tapped his arm popped. He claims he tapped before he screamed in pain, I swear to god he didn't and he definately didn't say 'tap', but man it made me feel like **** the rest of the night.

    Why am I going on about this? Well, the trouble I've had is that while I have some training partners who are tougher than steel and can stand your whole body cranking an RNC on them and then go on to tap you 30 min of nonstop rolling later, some guys just aren't built that way and their physique is not always the best indicated of that toughness. And so when you train with tough guys and using a ton of strength all the time, you can hurt other dudes unintentionally, even with good technique. This had been my main problem and hurting your training partners really really bites.
  7. NSLightsOut is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/01/2006 5:39am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Raynor
    Trap the palm against your pelvis with your forearm, sink back and bend the hand back.
    I tried this out today. It isn't possible.

    Try to visualise this. My thumb and the side of my first fingers are pushing into the groove formed between your hips and the top of your thighs. My palm is generally barely touching your thigh.

    In addition, what you're describing takes time Unless you happen to have an exceptional mount, you are going to go flying if confronted by someone good with this escape. It's a little impractical to execute this while the guy you're sitting on is bucking like a bronco.

    (To put this into perspective: I can count the people who've stayed on me for 30 seconds or longer in the last two years on one hand. Two of them were black belts. I still have a finger left over)

    Best defense, IMO, against a good mount escape is to bail to side-control or knee-ride when you feel destabilized.
  8. NSLightsOut is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/01/2006 7:27am


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Raynor
    You must be visualizing it improperly
    I very well could be.

    Question: Was the guy the black belt was demoing on pushing as I've described, or with the heels of the palms against the hips?
  9. NSLightsOut is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/01/2006 7:07pm


     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The way I perform my mount escape, my palms are sitting on my opponent's thighs. Putting the palm heels on the hips is actually less energy-efficient then doing it my preferred way of using thumb and forefingers in the groove between hips and thighs, and it opens you up to your wrist lock.

    Honestly, I'd think of the wristlock against mount escape as a move that wouldn't really work against someone of much technical skill.
  10. UpaLumpa is offline
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    Posted On:
    3/03/2006 12:45pm

    supporting member
     Style: BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Gringo Grande
    If someone has the mount on you and you are able to place your fists on or around their pelvis and basically press them up as you upa...is this generally considered a bad habit to get into as opposed to working to replace some type of guard and/or sweep?
    If you're initially raising your hips off the ground, then begin pushing with your arms at your hips' maximal height, dropping your hips (continue pushing up with arms) and then bring a knee, or both through and regain guard; then this is actually a standard technique.

    If you're just hurling the guy off you, you're a douche.

    When I started bjj I was always the strongest or closest to strongest guy on the mat (of course I haven't lifted consistently since, so much for my 400lb bench). Even now, without regular lifting, I'm quite strong for my weight. Putting that aside is the best thing you can do for your game. And it's always there when you compete. Or if some former allstate hs wrestler weighing 220 wants to show the small guys (I'm down to 190) what's up and you want to assmaster him physically and technically.
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