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  1. Bang! is offline
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    Light Heavyweight

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    Posted On:
    1/31/2006 4:06pm

    supporting memberBullshido Newbie
     Style: Wu Style TCC + BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Ok. I see where you're going with this, particularly since it's only been fairly recently that I've realized just how badly I need to buckle down and work on my transitions.

    I think that as long as I can transition into a deep underhook after a failed tsurikomi, then following it up the way you've described should be fairly doable. Ist korrect?
  2. Yrkoon9 is offline
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    Brock Sampson

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    Posted On:
    1/31/2006 4:15pm

    supporting member
     Style: 5.56

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Mileage may vary by user. I use what works for me.

    There are a million set up for seoi. Heck, some guys can just jump right into that ****!

    My buddy Mark Kompanyets (BJJ black belt) absolutely owns BJJ guys with drop seoi with no set up at all. BJJ guys who lean forward are ripe for this. He just jumps right under them and pulls. They practically throw themselves.

    I like to get my opponent twisted and rotated for an entry. But I am tall and weak. If you are short and powefull you might want to think about other entries.

    Smaller guys don't have as good a Tsurikomi in my opinion. They just don't have the limb length. But they can hop right in with a Kouchi attack and spin right into seoi, or attack with Ouchi into seoi.

    Aaaaghh. I have to stop. Too much crap with too little expertise. I think one of the better Judo guys here on this site might be able to help more.
  3. Bang! is offline
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    Light Heavyweight

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    Posted On:
    1/31/2006 4:28pm

    supporting memberBullshido Newbie
     Style: Wu Style TCC + BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I know what you're saying about limb strength. There are subtle little things that I've been taught to do, like rolling the elbow outward, which help a lot. Howevery, they can also be really hard to apply.

    As far as seoi goes, my natural -- and oh so conservative -- tendency is to fear it, but people who stubbornly try to double-leg have been begging for it, so that's a good place to practice.

    Thanks for your input. And respond to my PM, dammit.
  4. dakotajudo is offline
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    Judo Instructor

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    Jul 2002
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    South Dakota
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    Posted On:
    1/31/2006 4:30pm

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Repulsive Monkey
    Cool. Any thoughts on adapting tsurikomi to no gi? I used to think that I should be bringing the arm across, but that's proved to be really impractical compared to leveraging the elbow out. Am I on the right track? Bear in mind that I'm a short fucker.
    Are you talking about sasae-tsurikomi-ashi, or tsurikomi-goshi?

    Tsurikomi refers to the actions of your hands, and is kinda hard to do, no-gi.

    Most times, when I hear tsurikomi, I assume the goshi. And when you describe bringing the arm across, it sounds like a sode-tsurikomi variation. That can be done, no gi.

    But what Yrkoon is talking about, is sasae.

    Sasae is very commonly done, no-gi. I've seen it used in college wrestling, and MMA clips. Just use an overhook, and sasae the foot one the same side.

    For shorter guys, sasae to the power grip side usually works better than to the pulling grip - you don't need as much length, and can get your power underneath better. It's almost a harai-tsurikomi-goshi.

    I do this with a left grip. I first learned judo rightie, but have a bad shoulder, so I shifted grip. But I can still do sasae with the same foot (left) as I learned originally from the right grip. Then I might use it to set up a wrong-handed seoi - that is, keeping my left grip, turn into a right seoi (keep some slack on the lapel, right hand comes under).
  5. Bang! is offline
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    Light Heavyweight

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    Posted On:
    1/31/2006 4:42pm

    supporting memberBullshido Newbie
     Style: Wu Style TCC + BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Talking about the sasae version. Sorry; still trying to learn judo terminology, as no one knows what the **** I'm talking about when I say things like "Double Lotus."

    I definitely like the idea of being able to go either direction with this one. I have a tendency to get an overhook and pin the arm deep under my armpit, so I can see this working toward that side, or -- with a really good offset step -- toward the side with a neck grip.
  6. Ridder is offline

    Registered Member

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    Posted On:
    2/03/2006 7:24pm


     Style: Judo, Wrestling, Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What all the guys have said here is good to take into account. Ippon is a great throw and it feels so nice to pull it off crisp and clean. Keep in mind that you need to pull them to you. The off-balance is key in all throws, get them to want to move in the direction of your throw. Kizush, entrance, execution, remember.

    Also, remember to turn all the way and "dissappear"--that is to say, get under them and your hips in deep. I'm not sure what your height is, but that's a general point. Be sure to get the crook of your elbow deep up there, and use your forward momemtum to fly 'em over.

    Practice, as always, and focus on technique and fluidity before speed.
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