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  1. Neildo is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/08/2006 1:15pm

    Join us... or die
     Style: FBSD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Elnyka, it's been a few months since the OP.


    Just curious, have you been attending the class?

    Everyone seems to be giving very similar advice.
    If you haven't done it yet, you should try.
    :new_all_c
  2. Red Elvis is offline
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    Da Komrads... Again you are MadPelvisOwn3d!

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    Posted On:
    4/08/2006 6:44pm

    supporting member
     Style: Spetsnaz Shovel-Fu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Update Please
    .
    :icon_twis
    .

    To fight and conquer in all your battles is not supreme excellence;
    Supreme excellence consists in breaking the enemy's resistance without spilling your Guinness.
    Sun "Fu Man JhooJits" Tzu, the Art of War & Guinness
  3. selfcritical is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/09/2006 2:46pm


     Style: Pekiti, ARMA, other stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quick question about Latosa in regards to other FMA.

    As it's usually taught next to EMBAS WC, does it use the WC footwork and angulation, with hands kept from crossing centerline, or is the more distinctively filipino triangular footwork w/flanking attacks? In what other ways would it differ in approach or training from standard FMA?
  4. DJR is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/09/2006 8:56pm


     Style: BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by selfcritical
    Quick question about Latosa in regards to other FMA.

    As it's usually taught next to EMBAS WC, does it use the WC footwork and angulation, with hands kept from crossing centerline, or is the more distinctively filipino triangular footwork w/flanking attacks? In what other ways would it differ in approach or training from standard FMA?
    I took Latosa Escrima for while a with a German instructor, and also tried a bit of WT, and they didn't seem to have much in common. The Latosa stuff was was a lot more straightforward and practical than WT. WT was kind of a waste of time for me, whereas I learned things in my Latosa classes that I've been able to use in the real world.

    The footwork I learned for Latosa Escrima was somewhat similar to the triangular footwork in other FMAs I've tried. Overall, the system seemed a bit more linear and direct than some of the other FMA I've seen, and less flashy/technical in terms of technique (i.e. no abanicos, etc). My instructor didn't bother teaching wristlock based disarms either, as he felt they weren't reliable and left you open to attacks from your opponents free hand.
  5. Teh El Macho is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/09/2006 9:19pm

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Neildo
    Elnyka, it's been a few months since the OP.


    Just curious, have you been attending the class?

    Everyone seems to be giving very similar advice.
    If you haven't done it yet, you should try.
    Yo, yo, guys.

    I haven't gone in about a month unfortunately due to work. However, I've been taking my sticks to the gym and done the drills to develop power in the heavy bag once to three times a weeks. I hope I can go back again to the classes by the end of april...

    It certainly seems to be true that one can learn escrima with one class per week. A lot of is the triangular footwork as well as dropping the weight behind the strikes (very similar to dropping the weight behind a punch in boxing.)

    I was taking the class with Thomas Stuebe on Saturdays from 1:50 till 3:30pm. A typical class would with warming up drills (wrist and shoulders), very similar to the drills found in DBMA tapes, followed by drills to develop power against a thai pad.

    After that, we would go over with redondo drills against stationary sticks or against somebody doing the same. After that, the class would focus on a particular thing, be it a blocking technique, an attack technique, or as in my last class, a dissarming technique.

    I heard his WC classes weren't that optimal, plus I've never been quite interested in that art. However, I liked the escrima class a lot. What I liked about Thomas is that he is very practical in his approach regarding escrima.

    For example, during one double-stick blocking/atacking technique he was going over, I asked if the same thing could be done with empty hands. He said yes, but that would not be the most optimal thing, and he went over what to do and not do with two sticks, single sticks and empty hands. No BS, or magical chi ****.

    This particular escrima class is pretty practical and pragmatic. The only thing is that we never sparred. Anyways, we were a bunch of n00bs without protecting gear, so any sparring was done with foam sticks... and thank God that was because for the rest of the class we would use real sticks... and boy, there was no class when I wouldn't get my knuckles hit just by going over the drills. Thomas didn't trust us yet to do the sparring, but I know he sparred hard with one of the students (the only one so far advanced enough to do so.)

    The class is worth it, but so long as one trains by himself as well (as I was told at the beginning of this thread.) I have to say that doing the power drills with the sticks against a sandbag really works your forearms. My grip strenght has increased in part because of that.

    I don't exactly know how I am going to continue, though. I just finally got my health insurance, and I'm planning to train again in Judo. There are other classes that I want to check as well (sanda and mma for boxing), but they conflict with the escrima class :(

    I really recommend this class to anyone in South Florida that wants to learn escrima - it's convenient (Saturdays), it's affordable ($15 for almost 2 hours), there are no contracts, the classes are small, and the instructor seems to know what he is doing. :viking:

    -- Kudos.
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  6. Teh El Macho is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/09/2006 9:25pm

    supporting member
     Style: creonte on hiatus

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by selfcritical
    Quick question about Latosa in regards to other FMA.

    As it's usually taught next to EMBAS WC, does it use the WC footwork and angulation, with hands kept from crossing centerline, or is the more distinctively filipino triangular footwork w/flanking attacks? In what other ways would it differ in approach or training from standard FMA?
    This is the only type of FMA I've taken, but I've been comparing it with other FMA-based arts (just by looking at videos or books) such as doce pares, DBMA, and kali ilustrisimo, and the triangular footwork is pretty similar. Seems to be more linear. The basic strikes in latosa escrima are basically the same as in other FM arts, but the numbering/naming conventions are different.

    What I was told in the class is that in Latosa escrima, you always attack, you don't worry "what if". That is, you don't wait for an attack to block, you attack or block as you are attacking following by an attack. We drilled in situations where the opponent may disarm you, which in that case you let go of the stick and attack with your hand or with a kick, knee or throw - it's hard to explain given my limited exposure, nor do I know if the other FM arts are the same.
    Read this for flexibility and injury prevention, this, this and this for supplementation, this on grip conditioning, and this on staph. New: On strenght standards, relationships and structural balance. Shoulder problems? Read this.

    My crapuous vlog and my blog of training, stuff and crap. NEW: Me, Mrs. Macho and our newborn baby.

    New To Weight Training? Get the StrongLifts 5x5 program and Rippetoe's "Starting Strength, 2nd Ed". Wanna build muscle/gain weight? Check this article. My review on Tactical Nutrition here.

    t-nation - Dissecting the deadlift. Anatomy and Muscle Balancing Videos.

    The street argument is retarded. BJJ is so much overkill for the street that its ridiculous. Unless you're the idiot that picks a fight with the high school wrestling team, barring knife or gun play, the opponent shouldn't make it past double leg + ground and pound - Osiris
  7. selfcritical is offline

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    Posted On:
    4/10/2006 4:02pm


     Style: Pekiti, ARMA, other stuff

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by elnyka
    This is the only type of FMA I've taken, but I've been comparing it with other FMA-based arts (just by looking at videos or books) such as doce pares, DBMA, and kali ilustrisimo, and the triangular footwork is pretty similar. Seems to be more linear. The basic strikes in latosa escrima are basically the same as in other FM arts, but the numbering/naming conventions are different.

    What I was told in the class is that in Latosa escrima, you always attack, you don't worry "what if". That is, you don't wait for an attack to block, you attack or block as you are attacking following by an attack. We drilled in situations where the opponent may disarm you, which in that case you let go of the stick and attack with your hand or with a kick, knee or throw - it's hard to explain given my limited exposure, nor do I know if the other FM arts are the same.

    Is the training of the stick blade-oriented, or does it assume the stick as a stick, with all sides equally valid for striking?
  8. Otaku Waffle is offline
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    Posted On:
    4/10/2006 4:55pm


     Style: Kali/Jun Fan/CSW

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by elnyka
    We drilled in situations where the opponent may disarm you, which in that case you let go of the stick and attack with your hand or with a kick, knee or throw - it's hard to explain given my limited exposure, nor do I know if the other FM arts are the same.
    I'm no FMA master, but in Inosanto kali and the IKAEF system (which is Modern Arnis based) the attitude of "So you took my stick? EAT HOT FIST!" is present as well. It damn well works in sparring, too (which we should do more of), as long as you /immediately/ react.
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