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  1. #31

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
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    1,738
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I would pull every string in the book to do BJJ.

    Depending on the instructor and your own commitment, you may be able to strike a deal as a 'starving student'.

    I really push this because, not only is BJJ awesome (yes, nutriding), but also I am a college student and I have many friends who 'can't afford BJJ' when they damn well could if they cut back on their wasted cash eating out at shitty places all the time, buying expensive on-campus **** and every new edition of the ipod, alcohol and way too much pot.

    Trust me, I stopped lifting (because I can't afford to eat enough :XX3d: ), partying, eating out and might have to sell my little boat (which I restored) soon just to continue to be able to afford BJJ. It's worth it.

  2. #32

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    4
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Double Post...
    Last edited by Nice But Dim; 5/16/2006 10:03am at .

  3. #33

    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    4
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I trained with the Jitsu Foundation for about three years from 2003 to 2006.

    In my opinion most of the observations here are accurate. Obviously it varies from club to club, but I experienced little resistive training with joint locks and throws, virtually no striking was taught but they expected you to integrate striking in almost every technique (I think that I had something like three sessions on it in three years), and almost no sparing (I saw some once but did not participate), while my instructors were great guys it is a large organisation and has more than its fair share of dickheads in high places, in training you were rushed onto the next technique before you had come to grips with the previous one.

    On the plus side you will develop great break-falling skills, it is a “jack of all trades” style so you be exposed to all aspects of self defence, its cheap to train and the clubs are usually very sociable.

    Do I regret taking it? No. Whilst it has its faults (mainly lack of resistive training), it has given me exposure to striking, kicking, joint locks, throws, vulnerable parts of the body, ground-fighting, weapon defences and strategy for multiple attacker situations. I feel that whilst I no longer which to train with the Jitsu Foundation, it has given me a good base to work with and specialise in the future.

    I am starting Muay Thai and BJJ over the summer, and at some point I hope to add Judo or wrestling for the takedowns. I intend to restart training with the Foundation after a few years of cross-training, primarily because it takes a holistic approach, useful for integrating strikes, locks and throws, and because the clubs have such a great atmosphere.

    As an aside regarding sharps, one of the rumours floating around one of the clubs that I trained at was that the instructor (a 1st Dan) had managed to stab himself in the leg whilst training with s knife..

  4. #34

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    3,334
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Diomedes
    There's no university Judo club unfortunately, though there are probably private clubs in the city. Basically Uni clubs are all I can afford to attend since they're much cheaper for students. The Muay Thai and Boxing clubs are superb, but I dont have any experience with the rest. They've got two TKD clubs and two Karate clubs as well, but I'm not particularly interested in them - I might check out the Kyokushin one sometime though.

    I take it your university has a Kyokushin club ? If it does then you shoud check it out. If it's a university club it'll be cheap and you can't go past Kyokushin. If you want hard training and shitloads of fighting, Kyokushin is the way to go.

    But if you have your heart set on learning a grappling art then you may have to go with BJJ or Judo. Even if the Judo club is not part of the university it'll be cheaper than BJJ. Since money is an issue here, have a look at the Judo club in your town aswell.
    Hannibal: The sworn enemy of dishonest politicians, source of entertainment on Bullshido and newly appointed Office Linebacker. Terry Tait ain't got **** on me !!!!

  5. #35
    alex's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    8,202
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    uni clubs, at least here, really arent *that* cheap compared to some places outside. most people who go to uni have at least some money or they wouldnt be there. look around for judo clubs cos i will bet they are cheaper than you think.

  6. #36

    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Sydney
    Posts
    3,334
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Absolutely.

    As a rule of thumb, BJJ costs the earth and Judo is normally very cheap. Can't see why, same sort of material really.
    Hannibal: The sworn enemy of dishonest politicians, source of entertainment on Bullshido and newly appointed Office Linebacker. Terry Tait ain't got **** on me !!!!

  7. #37

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    SF CA
    Posts
    77
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    look for other places to do bJJ. I train under a gracie purple and brown belt ( no gi) at a krav maga school. small classes, great instruction, and less than half of the cost for a gracie school.

  8. #38

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    15
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    some video footage of Jitsu Foundation training.

    Champions of the syle will no doubt claim that this clip does not represent the best training that the style has to offer. They would be right. However, it is fairly typical, especially at lower grades.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lYXrRrlVlIU

  9. #39

    Join Date
    Nov 2005
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    434
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    DON'T DO IT!

    Making martial arts choices based on cost is not a good idea, IMO.

    You CAN make money back, but the cost of bad habits in your brain will haunt you, and it's not easy to remove them. They could permanently ruin your ability to fight :5sigh: If you're unlucky.

    If you REALLY REALLY can't afford it, then don't take up a sub-standard martial art. Just go and play another sport or get yourself fit. If "Jitsu" is as bad as the video in the post above mine, then it looks like a waste of time.

  10. #40

    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    15
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    In fairness I should point out that pretty much all the students in the video are yellow/orange belts which makes them little more than committed beginners.

    However, the "V" which is basically one step sparring is a consistent feature of Jitsu training and is generally (although I understand this is changing) about as "alive" as it generally gets (outside of the odd bit of groundwork).

    As you go up the grades attacking gets "better" as do the counter attacks, but the basic training/testing methods are the same.

    EDIT: because of the emphasis on wrist locks, a very large proportion of Jitsuka have dammaged/weak wrists- for this reason alone I think it should carry a health warning.
    Last edited by flange; 5/31/2006 9:28am at .

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