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  1. #21
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I am a long-time student of Barry Bradshaw (known variously as Kancho / Professor / "The Professor of Pain" etc.). He is a very impressive martial artist, but he does not claim to represent the Kodokan and his rank as a 10th dan is not from the Kodokan (nor does he claim it to be).

    If anyone thinks that he plies "Bullshido" they would be advised to visit his dojo!

  2. #22
    kwoww's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Lower Hudson Valley / Rochester
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    1,986
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    If it's not from the Kodokan where is the 10th dan from?

  3. #23

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    759
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    As well, if he does not represent the Kodokan, how come the kata requirements for the Jujitsu system formulated in the 16th century by Chineses Buddhist Nuns(we'll deal with that little bit later) consists of 4 Kodokan katas developed 3-400 years after the development of this style? http://www.jiujitsu.org.au/art_jiujitsu.html

  4. #24

    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,046
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by dakotajudo
    judo-do
    gentle way way?

  5. #25

    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    Melbourne, Australia
    Posts
    1
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Cdnronin:

    As the web-site says "According to oral tradition, Tai-jitsu Ryu was codified by a group of Chinese Buddhist nuns living in Japan in the 16th Century."

    This does not preclude evolution and extension over the following centuries. Kawaishi (along with several other early Kodokan masters) were exponents of various styles of Jiu-Jitsu prior to coming into Kano's stable.

    Kawaishi taught various kata. See his still-in-print book "The Seven Katas of Judo".

  6. #26

    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Ottawa
    Posts
    759
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by danprager
    Cdnronin:

    As the web-site says "According to oral tradition, Tai-jitsu Ryu was codified by a group of Chinese Buddhist nuns living in Japan in the 16th Century."

    This does not preclude evolution and extension over the following centuries. Kawaishi (along with several other early Kodokan masters) were exponents of various styles of Jiu-Jitsu prior to coming into Kano's stable.

    Kawaishi taught various kata. See his still-in-print book "The Seven Katas of Judo".

    Although many of the early Kodokan masters did come from various jiu jitsu ryu prior to joining the Kodokan, there is no solid evidence that Kawaishi was one of them. I have 6 of Kawaishi's books. All the kata in his book are from Kodokan judo.

    "This does not preclude evolution and extension over the following centuries" That in and of itself is a fair statement. However, it does not answer why all kata requirements are from the Kodokan, with nothing earlier or different to distinguish this "ryu". What was the original name of this school? Tai-jitsu ryu is more than a little generic.

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