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  1. UrbanArmory is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/15/2005 6:36pm


     Style: nothing

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tacitus
    I agree completly. But what I'm trying to say is that another difference with ground fighting in the koryus, aside from the change in distance due to weapons, is also that there is, when wearing armour, a differance in method of joint locking, sory of like gi and no-gi.
    From what I understand, most koryu jujitsu schools have techniques deliniated for armored opponents and others for un-armored opponents. When someone is armored, not only do certain locks and the like become very impractical/impossible, but you and your opponent are very top heavy- that affects balance alot, and techniques usually seek to take advantage of that.

    The common thread in both is that they assume that the opponent has the option of drawing a weapon, and to be as safe from that as possible.
  2. UrbanArmory is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/15/2005 6:47pm


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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Knecht Ruprecht
    And getting a stick jammed into me while I work a choke is still better than getting whacked repeatedly while the guy with the stick dances outside my striking range.
    Honestly, try this out (CAREFULLY!). Get a friend and see what he can do with a stick while grappling. I actually learned this stuff not from any MA, but from when me and my brother (both of us were taught a little wrestiling from our dad) would essencially beat each other with sticks in the backyard as kids (ah, the memories...). Good target points are:

    anywhere between the collarbone and the neck
    back of the head where it meets the neck
    under the arms
    right above or below the ribcage
    solar plexus
    between the shoulder blades
    kidneys, both back and front
    back of the hand
    be inventive!

    It'll suprise the hell out of you, what a little stick can do.
  3. Tacitus is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/16/2005 1:12pm

    supporting member
     Style: Crazy Monkey, BJJ, MT

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    From what I understand, most koryu jujitsu schools have techniques deliniated for armored opponents and others for un-armored opponents. When someone is armored, not only do certain locks and the like become very impractical/impossible, but you and your opponent are very top heavy- that affects balance alot, and techniques usually seek to take advantage of that.
    Aight! I'll stfu. That was just something I was told, and thought it might have relevance, but to be honest, I know almost nothing of feudal Japan, so I probably shouldn't have said anything. Won't happen again. I see your point. Basically, what I said has little to no relevance...that's what you get for responding to a thread while you're gettng a bj!
  4. UrbanArmory is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/16/2005 6:46pm


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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    tH3 r34L BJJ!
  5. Cdnronin is offline

    Ghost of Kawaishi

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    Posted On:
    12/16/2005 9:18pm


     Style: judo, parenting

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I just got a copy of the game of jiu jitsu by Yukio Tani and Taro Miyake(190..?)
    very early English jiu jitsu manual. Tani and Miyake were some of the first japanese Martial artists brought over by Barton-Wright at the turn of the last century. This book is from roughly 10- 15 years before Yukio Tani joined the Kodokan(via the Budokwai). Chapters on arm bars, leg locks, and ground work. All given english terminology(no Japanese description and translations). I believe Tani was Tenshin-ryu. Some fun reading for the weekend, checking out 100 year old BJJ :toothy10: .
  6. Virus is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/17/2005 2:08am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Fumio Manaka was on e-budo answering peoples questions and someone asked him about newaza. I thought he would have something really interesting to say but it turns out he's not much of a conversationalist. http://www.e-budo.com/forum/showthread.php?t=3296

    As much as I respect the guy, that's just bollocks about standup skills working on the ground. That's why the Kodokan was whupped by the Fusen Ryu despite being the best standup grapplers.
  7. Spunky is offline

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    Posted On:
    12/17/2005 2:59am


     Style: Bujinkan Budo Taijutsu

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Perhaps he is trying to communicate that you'll uncover the same core principles in both paradigms even if they are technically implemented differently. Not knocking focused groundwork study today, but based on the discussion so far I think that this was "good enough" back in they day.
  8. Virus is offline
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    Posted On:
    12/17/2005 3:41am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Judo

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Could be. I've heard a lot of guys say "If your stand-up is good, you will be able to fight on the ground" which is BS.
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