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  1. Poop Loops is offline
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    OOOOOOOOOOAAARRGGHH RLY?

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    Posted On:
    11/01/2005 1:30am

    supporting member
     Style: In Transition

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    ...hockey?

    PL
  2. Tourettes is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/01/2005 1:36am


     Style: judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The most important thing is to be patient. You're brand new to two arts - count the hours instead of the months you've been training unless you train all day and then see where you are in a year, especially because you've not been very active before. Congradulations though, you already have a much better awareness of your balance now than when you first started training and it's only been x amount of hours spanning 2 months. Plus you're practing at home - that's important as well. Make sure though, that you pracitce quality over quantity.

    Specifically:

    WIth BJJ (newaza for me), if you've only been training for a few months, then it'll just take time - groundwork can be very disorientating. I don't know which guard pass you're working on, so perhaps you're righthanded and your pushing hard with the right leg (straightening it and pushing) and ending up leaning left.

    I'm not a striker so all I can really offer here is conjecture. Are you falling forward when you throw the kicks - like, leaning your body in and kind of falling onto the front leg heavier than you want? If so, you might want to get your hips out further and lean back a bit and shift your center of gravity back slightly - your upper body will act as a counter-balance to your legs. However, with muay thai, maybe you don't want to do this - maybe you need to stand upright in which then the muscular strength of your support leg, hips + lower back will come into play. Weaknesses/stiffness in any of these areas can throw things off and make balancing harder. But, I can't say for sure - others here on the forums certainly can, though you're going to need to experiment and figure out what works for you based on your body type

    If you weren't doing 2 arts, I'd say get a few classes of yoga in a week - even 1 day should make a considerable difference considering your skill level. It will get your flexibility + relaxation up but more importantly, it'll give you amazing body awareness. Simply put, yoga rocks , I still try to do it when I have extra time, even just 1 pose for a minute.

    Equipment based exercises include standing on balance boards, inflatable stability discs, and my favorite stability balls(Do NOT stand on these ) and bosu balls (bosus rock - love the damn thing). Freeweight traning can also help heaps, when it's done correctly.

    Equipment free exercises include one legged hopping (side to side + back to front while trying to be as light on the feet as possble), 1 legged squats (find someone to show you these - don't try to blast down like you see other people doing - going down halfway at first while holding on to something for, yup, balance), standing on 1 foot with your eyes closed(other leg raised and bent at the knee, then straightening the arms out to the side and then forward/back slowly).

    Yoga though, yoga's it, seriously, though be careful about trying toohard and injuring yourself - start off slow.
  3. bodar is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/01/2005 2:35am


     Style: none currently, ex-TSK

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tourettes
    Yoga though, yoga's it, seriously, though be careful about trying toohard and injuring yourself - start off slow.
    Good point. The Tree, which I posted above, is a good starter pose, as is Airplane:

    http://www.powerofyoga.com/img_yoga_postures/x6.jpg

    THEN, you can go for this one:

    http://www.maui-yoga.com/images/nadi...-leg-exten.jpg :cool:
  4. lawdog is offline

    Middleweight

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    Posted On:
    11/01/2005 8:42am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo & Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think Tourettes pretty much nailed it. I would add though that sometimes what people perceive as poor balance is actually a lack of strength. For instance, your inability to balance on one leg while throwing that double kick may be due to a lack of leg, or maybe even ankle strength. Yoga will make you very aware of that.

    Everything already mentioned is excellent, especially the one legged squats and the BOSU trainer. I'd also add rope skipping.
  5. VikingPower is offline
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    Yes Koto got his name changed, quit asking...

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    Posted On:
    11/01/2005 8:52am

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     Style: Kyokushin Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    One-legged squats.
  6. KhorneliusPraxx

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    Posted On:
    11/01/2005 9:19am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by garbanzobean
    For Muay Thai: At the school I took MT at (Khornelius Praxx's school), the instructor had a set of leg stretches everyone did together at the beginning of the class. Something like holding a front kick, side kick, and uhh . . . something else (maybe a reverse kick. Hell, I don't know) at 3 progressively higher levels for a certain amount of time. I started doing this on my own as well and it worked wonders for my balance.
    Ok, here is what GB is talking about:
    Everybody finds a support, usually just put you palm on the wall. Don't grip anything, just be in contact with a solid surface for stability. Then we hold 15 different positions (5 different levels for 3 different kicking positions.) We usually hold these positions for about 15 sec. Longer would probably be better but that would cut into out class time. :laughing7
    I think the main reason for this is just stretching, to warm up our hips, but I could see that it would increase your balance. The longer you do it, the less you have to rely on the support of the wall.
    First we hold for the Straight Kick, or as I call it, "Jik Tek to the Nut Sack." We start with our shoulders perpendicular to the wall with our right hand on the wall. Right foot at a 45 angle. Hold your left leg straight forward, parallel to the wall, but only a couple of inches off the ground. When it is time to switch, turn around and repeat with the right leg. That is level one. Level five is as high as you can hold it. As you can guess, level two is 2/5 of the way up, level 3 is 3/5 of the way up, and level 4 is 4/5 of the way up.
    When we are done with that we change to the Round Kick position. Base foot at a 45 angle, like before. Leg now going perpendicular to the wall, in a round kick position (knee slightly up, toe higher than the heal.) We do all five levels with both legs.
    When we are done with that we change to the Side Kick position. Base foot is now perpendicular to the wall. Start with you hips parallel to the wall and your leg is now going straight back, keeping your leg straight with you heel higher than you toe. KEEP YOUR HEAD UP, looking over your shoulder at you foot. Again, we do both sides at all five levels.

    I saw one person doing this without holding the wall and the instructor said that we don't do it for balance, we do it to stretch. He made him put his hand on the wall and get his leg up higher. GB is probably right though, it has improved my balance as a side effect.

    I doubt this would do anything for your grappling though.


    Quote Originally Posted by garbanzobean
    Your brain and body are probably still just a bit confused with all this new "athleticism" stuff, especially since you say you've not been especially athletic before in life.
    I am the same way. This new "hobby" was started after 36 years of athletic incompetence. I was that kid that was always picked last for teams in grade school so I can understand where your coming from.
  7. Cassius is online now
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    Posted On:
    11/01/2005 9:36am

    supporting memberforum leader
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by KhorneliusPraxx
    I think the main reason for this is just stretching, to warm up our hips, but I could see that it would increase your balance. The longer you do it, the less you have to rely on the support of the wall.
    From my perspective, it helped with flexibility, balance, and even a little leg strength and was a pretty decent quick warm up for the leg muscles. It's something she can try, at any rate.
  8. Apostol is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/01/2005 11:03am


     

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    One-legged squats, not the Matt Furey type. Just keep your opposite leg in the air right by your other foot, or even a bit behind you. Don't set the foot down at any time.

    One-legged balance reach - stand on one leg, and keep the opposite leg in the air right by your foot. Take your leg and slowly move it in front of you like a straight-legged kick, and hold it at about waist level for maybe 2 seconds. Then bring it back without setting it on the ground.

    When kicking or doing anything related to balance, activate your abs/core.

    You can also do single leg lateral hops, by jumping side to side explosively and stabilizing for 2 seconds. You should be in a single leg squat position, make sure your back is arched, and not rounded. After you get good at this, integrate a single leg squat after the hop.

    Make sure you do not have any ankle pronation issues. If your ankles do not naturally line up with your 2nd to 3rd toe, or your leg collapses inward, your ankles pronate. You may be flat-footed if this is the case. Orthotics could greatly benefit you, if you happen to have this problem. But when doing all balance related exercises, or standing in general, make sure the middle part of your foot towards the big toe is not touching the ground, and your ankles are not pronating.
  9. bodar is offline

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    Posted On:
    11/01/2005 11:46am


     Style: none currently, ex-TSK

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Also, whenever you are doing balance exercises without a support, it helps immensely to fix your eyes on a single, small point in front of you... your eyes in the mirror, an imperfection on the wall, a blood stain on the floor :icon_wink , etc.
  10. Gypsy Jazz is offline
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    Posted On:
    11/01/2005 12:08pm


     Style: Does exercise count?

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Apostol
    One-legged squats, not the Matt Furey type. Just keep your opposite leg in the air right by your other foot, or even a bit behind you. Don't set the foot down at any time.
    Care to clarify what a "Matt Furey type" is and why not to do it that way? I have seen a few ways to do one legged squats.
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