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  1. Miguksaram is offline
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    Day Tripper/Dream Weaver

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    Posted On:
    10/31/2005 11:08am

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     Style: Shorei-ryu & Kumdo & TKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Did Musashi ever have students?

    Recently I have seen an influx of sword videos, from people claiming to teach the system of Musashi. For those who do not know, Miyamoto Musashi was a legendary swordsman of Japan who is the famed author of the book "Gorin no sho (Book of Five Rings)" and was believed to have fought in 60 duels. I haven't read anywhere that he ever opened up a school or had a disciple.

    So how is it possible for someone to know what he taught and how he taught it?
    Jeremy M. Talbott

    Quote Originally Posted by Phrost
    "Bullshido isn't just a place to hang out when you're browsing the net. We really are trying to accomplish something fucking extraordinary here that nobody's ever had the balls to do before."
    Quote Originally Posted by D.Murray
    "Which is better, to learn the truth, or to enjoy the illusion of being right when you are not?"
    Quote Originally Posted by hangooknamja88 View Post
    My definition of Ki is our energy. it's rather hard to explain it in words. It's not some mystical type of energy like white people...


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  2. Ronin is offline

    Merry Christmas Bitch

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    Posted On:
    10/31/2005 11:26am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Canadian Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    The Niten-ryu is a recognised system of bujutsu, no?

    Fighting with two swords is nothing new, nor did it originate with MM.
    But, anyone claiming to teach the Niten Ryu would have to have the appropriate paperwork.
  3. Miguksaram is offline
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    Day Tripper/Dream Weaver

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    Posted On:
    10/31/2005 11:48am

    supporting member
     Style: Shorei-ryu & Kumdo & TKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronin
    The Niten-ryu is a recognised system of bujutsu, no?

    Fighting with two swords is nothing new, nor did it originate with MM.
    But, anyone claiming to teach the Niten Ryu would have to have the appropriate paperwork.
    I agree that fighting with two swords is nothing new, but people are claiming to learn the system of MM, which leads me to believe that they are practicing what he learned during his traveling years and not just the basic system he grew up in.
    Jeremy M. Talbott

    Quote Originally Posted by Phrost
    "Bullshido isn't just a place to hang out when you're browsing the net. We really are trying to accomplish something fucking extraordinary here that nobody's ever had the balls to do before."
    Quote Originally Posted by D.Murray
    "Which is better, to learn the truth, or to enjoy the illusion of being right when you are not?"
    Quote Originally Posted by hangooknamja88 View Post
    My definition of Ki is our energy. it's rather hard to explain it in words. It's not some mystical type of energy like white people...


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  4. Ronin is offline

    Merry Christmas Bitch

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    Posted On:
    10/31/2005 11:50am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Canadian Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Again, IF the Niten Ryu is a recognised school of bujutsu, there would be "lineage" records.
    The Japanese are extremly constipated about these matters.
  5. Ronin is offline

    Merry Christmas Bitch

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    Posted On:
    10/31/2005 11:52am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Canadian Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Not sure how accurate:

    http://www.geocities.com/HotSprings/6065/

    Traditional Japanese Bujutsu

    This page contains, in alphabetical order, a number of traditional Japanese martial arts Ryu (schools) that might be of interest for serious students of Martial Arts. The list contains links - if available - to other sites that may have some more information. The links looks like this: [1]. I have also added links to a picture when possible. If you want to add items or links to the list, send me a message. I try to keep the information in the list historically correct, however, due to my limited knowledge of some ryu, errors might have occurred.

    Before the restoration of the Meji era in 1868 a very large number of ryu existed, there was reckoned to be about 3000 ryu. Most of the ryu was created by noble Samurai, others simply by ronin or even common people. The ryu sometimes divided into branches, ha, as a result of the various masters composing new techniques or movements from old ones. The seat of a ryu was usually located were the founder lived. Some ryu were independent, others belonged to the great families, Daimyo. Each master had his own style, ryugi, and transmitted the secrets, okuden, of his style to a few chosen disciples. Most of the ryu which still existed before the second world war have now dissapeared, for the old masters are dead and the pupils have deserted the dojo. According to the Bujutsu Ryu Soroku, a work published in 1843, there were in Japan at that date some 150 important Ryu; 66 teaching Ken-Jutsu and Iai-Jutsu, 31 teaching So-Jutsu, 20 teaching Ju-Jutsu, 19 in the use of firearms and 14 devoted to Kyu-Jutsu. Any Bujutsu/Budo system established before 1877 are recognised as Ko Ryu (old schools). Thereafter they are known as Gendai Bujutsu, or modern martial arts. Some ryu in this list, like the Chujo Ryu, are now extinct, others, like the Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu, still flourish today, dating back more than 500 years.

    In order to preserve the old styles and traditions the Dai Nippon Butokukai was founded in 1895 by the Japanese government. The headquarters, the Butokuden, is seated in Kyoto. The Nihon Kobudo Shinkokai (Society for the Promotion of Japanese Classical Martial Arts) also sponsors a demonstration of the classical martial arts at the Meiji Shrine in Tokyo, Japan, on November 3 each year.

    Anually, there is a kobudo demonstration at the Budokan. This event, held for the first time in 1978, is the premiere classical martial arts demonstration in Japan, Co-sponsored by the Nippon Budokan and the Nihon Kobudo Kyokai. Schools demonstrate by invitation only, and not all member traditions of the Nihon Kobudo Kyokai participate each year.

    If you are interested in genuine Japanese Swords I highly recommend


    Aoi Art, Tokyo

    The list contains 169 different Ryu. Last updated 1999-05-31

    Abe Ryu
    Kendo
    c. 1700
    The oldest traditional Kendo school, adapted from Ken-jutsu. Aio Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    c. 1600
    Aisu-Kage Ryu
    Anzawa Ryu
    Naginata
    c. 1600
    Araki Ryu [1] [2]
    c. 1600
    Founded by Araki (Mujinsai) Mataemon Minamoto Hidetsuna (c. 1584-1638).
    Ariki Hidetsuna was skilled in - amongst others - the Yagyu Shinkage Ryu and in the Muso Jikiden Ryu. Arima Shinto Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Arima Motonobu.
    Asayama Ichiden Ryu [1]
    Founded by Arima Motonobu.
    Buko Ryu
    Naginata
    Chujo Ryu
    Kenutsu
    c. 1400
    Founded by Chujo Nagahide.
    Daito Ryu [1]
    Aiki-Jutsu
    c. 1100
    Founded by Shinra Saburo Minamoto Yoshimitsu (1056-1127).
    Eishin Ryu

    Founded by Hasegawa Chikaranosuke Eishin (Hidenobu).
    Emmei Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Fudo Ryu

    Fudoshin Ryu

    Fukono Ryu
    Ju-jutsu, Kenjutsu
    Founded by Fukono Shichiroemon.
    Gan Ryu

    c. 1600
    Founded by Sasaki Kojiro.
    Specializing in the use of the no-dachi, a very long sword. Gassan Ryu
    Naginata
    c. 1800
    Gikan Ryu
    Koppojutsu
    Goju Ryu
    Karate-Do
    Founded by Miyagi Chojun (1888-1953).
    Gyokko Ryu
    Koshijutsu
    Gyokushin Ryu
    Ninjutsu
    Hakko Ryu [1] [2]

    c. 1938
    Founded by Okuyama Yoshiji.
    Hakutsu Ryu
    Ju-Jutsu
    Hasegawa Eishin Ryu
    Iaido
    reffered to as Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu Hasegawa Ryu

    Founded by Hasegawa Soki (1568-95).
    Hayashizaki Ryu
    Iai-jutsu
    reffered to as Shimmei Muso Ryu Higo Ko Ryu [1]
    Naginata
    Hikida Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Hikida Bungoro (1537-1606).
    Hikita Kage Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Hikita Kagekane (1573-92).
    Hioki Ryu
    Kyu-Jutsu
    Hoki Ryu
    Kenjutsu, Iai-jutsu, Kyu-jutsu
    Hokusai Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    c. 1700
    Hokushin Itto Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    c. 1830
    Founded by Chiba Shusaku (1794-1855).
    Chiba promoted an art of swordfighting that was less warlike and more spiritual. This ryu used a straight bokken in training (kumitachi style), the ancestor of the shinai used in modern Kendo. Followers of this ryu used to hold competitions in which the bokken was used against a person armed with a naginata. Honma Shinto Ryu Kenjutsu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Honma Masayoshi.
    Hontai Takagi Yoshin Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    Hontai Yoshin Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    Hoshin Ryu
    Naginata
    Hozan Ryu
    Kendo
    Hozo-in Ryu
    Kenjutsu,Yari, Ju-jutsu
    Founded by Hozo-in Ei (1521-1607).
    Hozo-in Ei was a guardian of the temples of Nara. Restored to popularity by the end of the nineteenth century. The most famous follower of this ryu in modern times was Takeda Minamoto no Masayoshi (1858-1943). Hyo Ho Niten Ichi Ryu [1]
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Miyamoto Musashi.
    The Hyo Ho Niten Ichi Ryu (two heavens as one school) was developed by Miyamoto Musashi, author of Go Rin No Sho "Book of Five Rings" and Japan's most famous swordsman. The school dates from the early 1600s and its most distinctive feature is its concurrent use of both the long and short swords. Ichiden Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    c. 1800
    Ichien Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Ichinomiya Ko Ryu
    Iai-jutsu
    Iga Ryu
    Ninjutsu
    Ikake Ryu
    Jitte, Keibo
    c. 1600
    Ippa Ryu

    Founded by Moroka Kagehisa.
    Isogai Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    c. 1669
    Founded by by a disciple of the chinese master Chén Yuan Bin.
    Isshin Ko Ryu
    Kusarigama
    Isshin Ryu
    Karate-Do
    Founded by Tatsuo Shimabuku.
    Tatsuo Shimabuku was a student of Okinawan Goju-Ryu and Shorin-Ryu Karate. Itto Ryu

    Founded by Ittosai Kagehisa (1560-1653).
    This ryu had a profund influence on the development of kendo. Followers of this ryu learned to master the spirit-heart (Shin), the spirit-breath of the internal energy (Ki) and the energy of the body (Ryoku). Thus they learned to act only when the emotions were quiet and free from any fear and evil intent. The fundamental principle in Itto Ryu is called Uchikachi, which means attack and defense in one blow. Itto Shoden Muto Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Jigen Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Togo Shigekura Bizen no Kami (1563-1643).
    One of the more famous followers of this ryu was Saigo Takamori (1827-77), the leader of the revolt on the island of Kyushu against obligatory conscription decreed by the emperor Meji. Jikiden Ryu
    Kenjutsu, Iai-jutsu
    c. 1250
    Founded by Onkeibo Chochen.
    This ancient ryu was developed with techniques that used the principles of tenshin sho (divine inspiration). It is said that the seventh master of this ryu was Izasa Ienao (1387-1488), the founder of Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu. Jikishin Kage Ryu
    Kenjutsu, Naginata
    c. 1560
    Founded by Yamada Heiazaemon (d. in 1578).
    Jikishin Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    Founded by Terada Kanemon.
    Juki Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    c. 1600
    Juki Shin Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    Jushin Ryu
    Iai-jutsu
    Kage Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Aizu Iko (1452-1538).
    Kan Ryu
    So-Jutsu
    reffered to as Owari Kan Ryu Kanemaki Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Jisai Michiie (1576-1615).
    Kankai Ryu

    Kashima Shinto Ryu [1] [2] [3] [4]
    Founded by Tsukahara Bokuden (1490-1571), son of a Shinto priest at the sanctuary of Kashima (Ibaraki prefecture).
    The Kashima Shinto ryu is one of the oldest samurai and most vigorous training organizations in Japan. The current (nineteenth generation) headmaster presides over more than a dozen branch schools and clubs (including several in Europe and North America) with a collective membership numbering in the hundreds of students. One of the most interesting features of Kashima Shinto ryu martial art is its comprehensive and holistic nature. Although training focuses on the use of the sword, Kashima Shinto ryu bugei, as practiced today, consists of twelve particularized military disciplines (bujutsu): kenjutsu swordsmanship batto-jutsu (sword drawing); naginata-jutsu (use of the naginata, a kind of glaive or voulges); sojutsu (spearmanship); kenjutsu-tachiai (use of the sword against other weapons); shuriken-jutsu (use of throwing darts); jujutsu (grappling); kenpo (striking and kicking); bojutsu (use of long staff); jojutsu (use of short staff; kaiken-jutsu or tanto-jutsu (use of knives and short swords); and tasuki-dori or hobaku-jutsu (tying or binding an opponent). These disciplines intertwine and co-exist as components of a single whole. Each contains all the others and is in turn contained by all of the others. Each draws on the same principles of thought and movement, differentiated only by the interaction of these principles with the distinctive characteristics of the weapon around which it revolves. None is complete in and of itself. Kashima Shinto ryu bugei, as an entity beyond a simple collection of tricks and strategies for fighting, materializes when taken in total, when all twelve bujutsu disciplines are melded into a single budo. Katori Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Kenshin Ryu
    Karate
    Founded by Hayashi Teruo.
    Hayashi Teruo was a follower of Kito Ryu Kijin Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Kito Ryu
    Kenjutsu, Bo-jutsu, Iai-jutsu, Ju-jutsu, Kusarigama
    Founded by Ibaragi Sensai.
    Ibaragi Sensai was a low rank samurai and a student of Yagyu Shinkage Ryu. Later Terada Kanemon developed Kito Ryu into a specific art of combat using only the bare hands. Its five principal Kata are preserved in the Koshiki-no-kata of Kodokan Judo. Kobayashi Shorin Ryu
    Karate-Do
    Koga Ryu
    Ninjutsu
    Kohgen Itto Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    In Kohgen Itto Ryu, training is broken into 3 major parts, consisting of Kata practice, Iai practice, and Shinai Kendo. Students learn in Kata practice how to deliver the edge of a sword most effectively to cut the object. In Iai practice, they learn how to handle a real sword and how to deal with opponents in close range fighting. In Kendo, they will focus on the intensity and speed of the cuts. Kosho Shorei Ryu
    Kenjutsu, Ju-jutsu
    c. 1235
    Koto Ryu
    Koppojutsu
    Koto-Eiri Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Specializing in dealing with several opponents at the same time. Koyama Ryu

    Kuki Shinden Ryu
    Happo Hikenjutsu
    Kumagokure Ryu

    Kurama Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    c. 1574
    Kushin Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    c. 1650
    Founded by Inugami Nagakatsu.
    Perfected around 1720 by his grandson Inugami Nagayasu (Inugami Gubei) Kyoshin Meichi Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Kyosui Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Minowa Kurando.
    Kyushin Ryu
    Yari
    Maniwa-nen Ryu
    Kenjutsu, Kusarigama, Ju-jutsu
    c. 1550
    Ancient ryu founded in the sixteenth century that still exists today. This ryu used somewhat spectacular training methods, like cutting a muffled arrow in two with a sword before it reached the swordsman. Masaki Ryu
    Naginata
    Mijin Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Negishi Tokaku.
    Miura Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    c. 1740
    Mizoguchi-ha Itto Ryu [1]
    Kenjutsu
    Mizuno Shinto Ryu
    Iai-jutsu
    c. 1600
    Founded by Kobayashi Koemon Toshinari.
    Mugai Ryu [1]
    Kenjutsu, Iai-jutsu
    c. 1695
    Founded by Tsuji Getten Sakemochi (1650-1729).
    Tsuji, the son of a farmer, began his experience with swordsmanship as a disciple of kenjutsu at the age of thirteen. Mugai ryu was a result of his more than thirty years of constant training. In his ryu Sakemochi taught hyodo, a method of fighting based on the Chinese philosophy of the interaction of the principles of Yin and Yang. Mugai ryu is not specifically intended to be a style dedicated to killing, but on the other hand, it is not intended that the exponent of Mugai ryu be killed should he/she face combat; Mugai ryu basis is in training with a defensive interpretation of combat. Through dedication to training, the exponent of Mugai ryu improves himself/herself mentally as well as physically. Muraku Ryu
    Iai-jutsu, Kenjutsu
    Founded by Nagano Muraku Kinrosai.
    Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu [1]
    Iaido
    Founded by Hasegawa Chikaranosuke Eishin (Hidenobu).
    Muso Jikiden Ryu

    reffered to as Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu Muso Shinden Ryu [1]
    Iaido
    c. 1955
    Founded by Nakayama Hakudo (Hiromichi, 1869-1958).
    Hiromichi was a master swordsman who studied and excelled in numerous shools, among others the Omori Ryu, the Muraku Ryu, the Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu, the Shindo Munen Ryu and the Yamaguchi Itto Ryu. The name Muso Shinden Ryu was introduced in 1955 by successors to Nakayama Hakudo, who originally called his art Muso Shinden Ryu Batto Jutsu. The history of Muso Shinden Ryu dates back to the sixteenth century, being the afterglow of the dynamic swordsman Hayashizaki Jinsuke Shigenobu and his Shimmei Muso Ryu. The study of Muso Shinden Ryu consists of Shoden, a basic level of training, based on the Omori Ryu Iai set, Chuden, a middle level of teaching, based on Muso Jikiden Eishin Ryu Iai. The most advanced stage is called Okuden, or inner / secret teachings. Additionally there are Kumi Gata techniques, and high rank students may also train Tameshigiri. Mutekatsu Ryu

    Muteki Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    c. 1650
    Ryu using using the concept of yawara-riki. Muto Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Yamaoka Tesshu (1837-88).
    Also known as the Itto Shoden Muto Ryu. Nagao Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    c. 1600
    Founded by Nagao Kenmotsu.
    Nagao Kenmotsu was a samurai of the Itto Ryu and Yagyu Shinkage Ryu. Nagao ryu makes use of Kakushi (hidden weapons), such as shuriken and kaiken. Nakamura Ryu
    Iai-jutsu
    Founded by Nakamura Taizaburo.
    Also called Nakamura Batto-Jutsu. Nakamura Taizaburo Sensei was a Student/Instructor at the Toyama Military Academy where he learned Toyama Ryu Iai. He did incorporate some of the Toyama Ryu elements into his own Ryu, particularly from Toyama Ryu Kata. All katas are performed from a standing position. There are eight kamae and eight cutting techniques in this ryu. Nakanishi-ha Itto Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    c. 1650
    Founded by Nakanishi Chuta.
    Nen Ryu
    Iai-jutsu
    Nikaido Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    c. 1600
    Founded by Matsuyama Mondo.
    Niten Ichi Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Reffered to as Hyo Ho Niten Ichi Ryu. Nito Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Reffered to as Hyo Ho Niten Ichi Ryu Ogasawara Ryu
    Kyudo, Reishiki (etiquette)
    c. 1500
    Oguri Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    c. 1616
    Founded by Oguri Niemon.
    Oishi Shinkage Ryu
    Kendo
    Founded by Oishi Susumu (1798-1865).
    Followers of this ryu used very long Shinai held in one hand and wore a Men (face protector) to guard aginst blows. This ryu advocated force rather than suppleness of action. Okuyama Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    c. 1580
    Founded by Okuyama Magojiro (1525-1602).
    Omori Ryu
    Iai-jutsu, Kenjutsu
    Founded by Omori Azaemon Masamitsu.
    The Iai set of his ryu is preserved with some modifications in the shoden (basic level) teachings of Muso Shinden Ryu and the Eishin Ryu Ono-ha Itto Ryu [1]
    Kenjutsu
    Oto Ryu
    Karate-Do
    Owari Kan Ryu [1]
    So-Jutsu
    Sakuri-ha Kohgen Itto Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Sekiguchi Ryu [1]
    Ju-jutsu, Kenjutsu
    c. 1650
    Founded by Sekiguchi Jushin (1597-1670).
    Shibukawa Ryu
    Kusarigama, Bo-jutsu, Ju-jutsu
    Founded by Shibukawa Hangoro.
    Shigenobu Ryu
    Iai-Jutsu
    Reffered to as Shimmei Muso Ryu Shimmei Muso Ryu
    Iai-Jutsu
    c. 1565
    Founded by Hayashizaki Jinsuke Shigenobu.
    Shin Muso Hayashizaki Ryu [1]
    Iai-jutsu
    Shin Muso Hayashizaki Ryu
    Iai-Jutsu
    c. 1550
    Founded by Hayashizaki Jinsuke Shigenobu.
    Referred Shin Sekiguchi Ryu
    Kenjutsu, Iai-jutsu, Ju-jutsu
    Shin Shin Sekiguchi Ryu [1]
    Kenjutsu, Iai-jutsu, Ju-jutsu
    Shin Tamiya Ryu
    Kenjutsu, Iai-jutsu
    Shin-no Shindo Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    c. 1550
    It taught 166 combat techniques. Shinden Fudo Ryu
    Dakentaijutsu, So-jutsu, Yari
    Founded by Izumo no Kanja Yoshiteru.
    Shindo Munen Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    c. 1750
    Founded by Fukui Heiemon Yoshihara (Kahei).
    Shindo Muso Ryu [1]
    Jo-jutsu
    Founded by Muso Gonnosuke.
    Shingyoto Ryu [1]
    Kenjutsu, Iai-jutsu
    Shinkage Ichien Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Shinkage Itto Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Shinkage Ryu
    Kenjutsu, Ju-jutsu, Iai-jutsu, Yari
    Founded by Kami Izumi Ise-no-Kami Fujiwara no Nobutsuna (1508-78).
    The founder wanted to improve the techniques of the Katori and Kage ryu. Shinkan Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Okuyama Tadenobu.
    Shinkeito Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Matsuura Seizan.
    The ryu lasted until 1908. Shinto Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Choisai Isaza.
    See Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu Shito Ryu [1]
    Karate
    Founded by Mabuni Kenwa (1889-1952).
    The school uses a large number of kata, about fifty, and power plays a very important role in the performance of its techniques. Shojitsu Kenri Katachi Ryu [1]
    1646
    taught the way using sword wearing armour. Shorin Ryu
    Karate
    c. 1830
    Founded by Matsamura Sokon (1809-1899).
    Further developed by his disciples Itosu Anko, Chibana Chosin and Katsuya Miyahira. Soken Ryu
    Kyudo
    Sosuishi Ryu [1]
    Ju-jutsu
    c. 1650
    Founded by Fugatami Hannosuke Mansanori.
    Before creating his own Ryu, Fugatami studied Takenouchi Ryu and many other schools. Suio Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    One of the techniques in this ryu is Shiho Giri (four directional cut), adopted in the curriculum of many Iai schools. This ryu is still active in Chiba. Taisha Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    c. 1610
    Founded by Marume Kurando (1540-1629).
    Takagi Ryu

    c. 1656
    A technique developed in the eighteenth century is called Rensa Sankaku ,"three sticks", used as a defense against an opponent with a sword. Takagi Yoshin Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    Takeda Ryu
    Aiki-jutsu
    Reffered to as Daito Ryu Takenouchi Ryu [1]
    Ju-jutsu, Kenjutsu, Mijikai Mono (short weapons)
    c. 1532
    Founded by Takenouchi Hisamori (Toichiro).
    This ryu once taught 630 techniques, about 150 are practiced today. Takeuchi Ryu
    Iai-jutsu
    Tamita Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Tamiya Ryu [1]
    Kenjutsu, Iai-jutsu
    Founded by Tamiya Heibei Shigemasa.
    Tamiya Heibei Shigemasa was a follower of Hayashizaki Jinzuke Shigenobus Shimmei Muso Ryu Taneda Ryu
    Yari
    c. 1600
    Founded by Taneda Jubei.
    Tatsumi Ryu [1]
    Kenjutsu, Iai-jutsu, Ju-jutsu
    Teishin Ryu
    Ju-jutsu, Kenjutsu
    Founded by Terama Heiazaemon.
    Tendo Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Saito Denkibo.
    Tenshin Shin-yo Ryu
    Ju-jutsu
    Founded by Iso Matemon.
    It once taught 124 atemi techniques, and also Osae (immobilization) and Shime (strangulation) techniques. Tenshin Sho Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Founded by Icchu Baichu-ken.
    Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu [1] [2] [3]
    Kenjutsu
    c. 1450
    Founded by Choisai lzasa ienao (1387-1488).
    Tenshin Shoden Katori Shinto Ryu is the first known school to have developed kenjutsu. The ryu is the oldest existing school in Japan, dating over 600 years. Tenshin Shoden is literally translated as divine transmission with the full name translated as the true and correct martial tradition of the gods.The school is centred around the sword with other weapons such as bo, naginata, kodachi, and yari being used in the partner practices. Tento Ryu
    Naginata
    Toda Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Toda-ha Buko Ryu [1] [2]
    Naginata
    Togakure Ryu

    c. 1200
    Founded by Daisuke Nishina.
    This ryu is still active in Iga. Toyama Ryu [1]

    Tsuda Kan Ryu
    So-jutsu
    Referred to as Owari Kan Ryu. Wado Ryu

    c. 1939
    Founded by Ohtsuka Hidenori.
    Yagyu Ryu [1]
    Kenjutsu, Ju-jutsu
    Founded by Yagyu Muneyoshi Tajima no Kami (1527-1606).
    Yagyu is the name of a village close to Nara, where this noble family originated. Yagyu Shingan Ryu [1] [2] [3]
    Ju-Jutsu
    Yagyu Shinkage Ryu [1] [2]
    Kenjutsu, Iai-jutsu, Ju-jutsu.
    c. 1603
    Founded by Yagyu Munenori.
    Yagyu Munenori was an instructor to the Tokugawa family. The first five Kenjutsu forms of the Yagyu Shinkage Ryu set are known as San Gaku Tori Age Zukai. The names of these kata are: 1) Itto Ryodan; 2) Zantei Setsutetsu; 3) Hankai Hanko; 4) Usen Saten; 5) Chotan Ichimi. The Fukuro-Shinai, a practice sword invented by the Yagyu family during the 1600s, is unique for this ryu. It consists of a split length of bamboo approximately four feet long, which is encased in a red tight-fitting leather bag. The development of this shinai was brought about to encourage safety in training while eliminating the need the pull one's cuts during practice. The Iai-jutsu training consists of the Saya no uchi batto gohon set, the five basic Iai forms in this ryu. Yamaga Ryu
    Kenjutsu, Ju-jutsu
    Founded by Yamage Soko (1622-85).
    Yamaguchi Itto Ryu
    Kenjutsu
    Yamato Ryu
    Kyujutsu, Kyudo
    c. 1640
    Reformed by Morikawa Kozan in 1664, who created the non-military from of Kyudo. Yanagi Ryu
    Ju-jutsu, Kenjutsu
    c. 1750
    Yo Ryu

    c. 1660
    Yoshin Ryu

    c. 1732
    Founded by Akiyama Shinobu.
  6. Toby Christensen is offline

    Martial mediocrite

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    3,150

    Posted On:
    10/31/2005 11:55am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Using bag as aggro outlet

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I hear reports Musashi assassinated a 10-year-old boy. Not good.
    What am I?:

    I am ignorant, thieving, lying, hypocrital, violent and thoroughly self obssessed. I steal from others to make myself look better, only to make the item or information worse.

    I go on and on and ON about how brave and strong and brilliant and wealthy I am, but in the end I'm all mouth and no trousers.

    That's right children, I'm your average AMERICUNT! and I exemplify AMERICA!:911flag:

    :occasion1

    JohnnyCache's "retort" proving how much he knows about medicine and geography and First World countries:
    http://www.bullshido.net/forums/show...=78188&page=22

    Yes, through persistent lack of work and the cultivation of ignorance, he is a true American.
  7. Miguksaram is offline
    Miguksaram's Avatar

    Day Tripper/Dream Weaver

    Join Date
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    Illinois
    Posts
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    Posted On:
    10/31/2005 11:55am

    supporting member
     Style: Shorei-ryu & Kumdo & TKD

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Ronin
    Again, IF the Niten Ryu is a recognised school of bujutsu, there would be "lineage" records.
    The Japanese are extremly constipated about these matters.
    I see. Yes, the Japanese were very good at record keeping.
    Jeremy M. Talbott

    Quote Originally Posted by Phrost
    "Bullshido isn't just a place to hang out when you're browsing the net. We really are trying to accomplish something fucking extraordinary here that nobody's ever had the balls to do before."
    Quote Originally Posted by D.Murray
    "Which is better, to learn the truth, or to enjoy the illusion of being right when you are not?"
    Quote Originally Posted by hangooknamja88 View Post
    My definition of Ki is our energy. it's rather hard to explain it in words. It's not some mystical type of energy like white people...


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  8. Ronin is offline

    Merry Christmas Bitch

    Join Date
    Sep 2003
    Location
    Canada
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    20,888

    Posted On:
    10/31/2005 11:59am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Canadian Shidokan

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Angry_Spastic
    I hear reports Musashi assassinated a 10-year-old boy. Not good.

    That was a "typo", in japanese the character for assassinate and assrape are almost the same.
  9. Matt Bernius is offline

    Middleweight

    Join Date
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    Location
    Rochester, NY
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    Posted On:
    10/31/2005 12:01pm

    supporting member
     Style: Kung Fu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Going from memory (always a dangerous thing) the Book of Five Rings was originially a series of letters written to a Pupil of Musashi. A quick search of the 'net turned this up:

    After six years in Ogura, Musashi was invited to stay with Churi, the Hosokawa lord of Kumamoto castle, as a guest. He stayed a few years with lord Churi and spent his time teaching and painting. In 1643, he retired to a life of seclusion in a cave called "Reigendo". Here he wrote Go Rin No Sho, addressed to his pupil Teruo Nobuyuki, a few weeks before his death on the nineteenth of May, 1645. " (Source - Victor Harris http://www.samurai.com/5rings/transintro/life.html)

    It appears that in later life, Musashi did take on students. No whether that was to explicitly teach swordsmanship or simply strategy I leave to others with more knowledge,

    - Matt
    Student of Wan Yi Chuan Kung Fu,
    Kali, & what ever works
    Renaissance Martial Arts
    Rochester, NY
  10. Method2Madness is offline

    Registered Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    833

    Posted On:
    10/31/2005 12:02pm


     Style: BJJ and MMA

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    i thought he had killed a 13 year old boy. but i got that info from the novel

    in the novel it says the boy was the heir to the yoshioka school.
    Last edited by Method2Madness; 10/31/2005 12:04pm at .
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