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  1. HorizonXP is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/11/2005 12:58am


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    Want to start Muay Thai, help needed

    Hey guys,

    First time posting, and I haven't been on these forums for long. I'm a COMPLETE newbie here, so bear with me...

    Basically, I want to take Muay Thai. I want to start in January. I go to school in Waterloo, ON, Canada, and I'm studying right now. In January, I'll be on a work-term, and hopefully in Waterloo again, so I'll have time to start Muay Thai.

    That said, few key issues:

    1. Right now, I'm insanely busy with school. Like, I should go to bed right now, and wake up early. I'm going to after I post this.
    2. I need to wake up early to start working out again. I did over the summer, and it did wonders for my body. But I still have lots to go because...
    3. I'm 5'10, 200 lbs (I haven't weighed in since July though). So I'm about 20 lbs overweight. I think in May, I was 205 lbs, but there's a SIGNIFICANT difference in my body composition now. Still a lot to go however.
    4. I've never done any martial arts, save karate for 3 weeks when I was in grade 5. My interest in Muay Thai is simply because I've wanted to do boxing, and muay thai seemed at least a bit more functional. It also seems to be PURELY strength training, which would be awesome for my body.

    Basically, I need to know what I can do prior to starting in January. My diet has been pretty shite lately because of school, but I eat healthy overall, especially since this past summer. I don't think I've put any weight back on. I need to do cardio, so I'm planning on running. But it's always been planning, and not any doing. I'll work on that tho. ;-) Should I hit the weights again? Stuff that fits into a busy 10+ hour day would be awesome.

    Also, is this even a good idea? What should I even expect? I stayed away from boxing because I was afraid of getting hit in the head -> losing brain cells. I'd be doing Muay Thai purely for myself, not for competition. Any recommendations for places around here?

    Again, newbie. Rip my **** apart if need be, but take that into account. Thanks guys.
  2. Torakaka is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/11/2005 1:41am

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    Quote Originally Posted by HorizonXP
    Hey guys,

    First time posting, and I haven't been on these forums for long. I'm a COMPLETE newbie here, so bear with me...

    Basically, I want to take Muay Thai. I want to start in January. I go to school in Waterloo, ON, Canada, and I'm studying right now. In January, I'll be on a work-term, and hopefully in Waterloo again, so I'll have time to start Muay Thai.

    That said, few key issues:

    1. Right now, I'm insanely busy with school. Like, I should go to bed right now, and wake up early. I'm going to after I post this.
    2. I need to wake up early to start working out again. I did over the summer, and it did wonders for my body. But I still have lots to go because...
    3. I'm 5'10, 200 lbs (I haven't weighed in since July though). So I'm about 20 lbs overweight. I think in May, I was 205 lbs, but there's a SIGNIFICANT difference in my body composition now. Still a lot to go however.
    4. I've never done any martial arts, save karate for 3 weeks when I was in grade 5. My interest in Muay Thai is simply because I've wanted to do boxing, and muay thai seemed at least a bit more functional. It also seems to be PURELY strength training, which would be awesome for my body.

    Basically, I need to know what I can do prior to starting in January. My diet has been pretty shite lately because of school, but I eat healthy overall, especially since this past summer. I don't think I've put any weight back on. I need to do cardio, so I'm planning on running. But it's always been planning, and not any doing. I'll work on that tho. ;-) Should I hit the weights again? Stuff that fits into a busy 10+ hour day would be awesome.

    Also, is this even a good idea? What should I even expect? I stayed away from boxing because I was afraid of getting hit in the head -> losing brain cells. I'd be doing Muay Thai purely for myself, not for competition. Any recommendations for places around here?

    Again, newbie. Rip my **** apart if need be, but take that into account. Thanks guys.

    there really isn't much of any weight training done in your average muay thai class, actually. The biggest thing will be cardio. Other than getting your cardio up to speed, there's really not any prep you need to start muay thai.
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  3. Equipoise is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/11/2005 1:58am

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    Start powerlifting.

    As for your "cardio." That term makes me want to eviscerate someone..

    I would recommend short bursts of high intensity aerobic activity such as wind sprints, or a stair master. I'd prefer the latter as it's easier on the joints unless you're trying to stomp a hole through the stairs.

    Do you have any specific diet/fitness questions?
    Last edited by Equipoise; 10/11/2005 2:27am at .
  4. Lothene is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/11/2005 2:16am

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     Style: Muay Thai

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    Go running, do strength exercises for your stomach and back, do squats and stretches.

    P.S. I don't really get people who want to do MA just for the fun of it. I don't think it's bad or anything, I just don't really understand.
  5. Torakaka is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/11/2005 2:21am

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lothene
    Go running, do strength exercises for your stomach and back, do squats and stretches.

    P.S. I don't really get people who want to do MA just for the fun of it. I don't think it's bad or anything, I just don't really understand.
    It's a hobby, like anything else, no different from reading a book. It just happens to be a potentially useful hobby.

    As far as the suggestions to do weight training and what not, that's really only NECESSARY if you plan on competing at any point. It's always a good idea (regardless of what you do) to stay in shape, but it is not at all necessary for doing muay thai as a hobby. Doing cardio exercises will make the classes easier and more enjoyable, but also not entirely necessary for a hobbyist.
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  6. Equipoise is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/11/2005 2:30am

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kidspatula
    It's a hobby, like anything else, no different from reading a book. It just happens to be a potentially useful hobby.

    As far as the suggestions to do weight training and what not, that's really only NECESSARY if you plan on competing at any point. It's always a good idea (regardless of what you do) to stay in shape, but it is not at all necessary for doing muay thai as a hobby. Doing cardio exercises will make the classes easier and more enjoyable, but also not entirely necessary for a hobbyist.

    Strength training benefits all. Resistance to injury, ease of movement, Higher immunities, enhanced recovery times, increased endurance due to the strength aspect of enduring activities, I can go on for days...
  7. HorizonXP is offline

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    Posted On:
    10/11/2005 2:32am


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    Aiight, over the summer, here's what I did:
    Day 1: Arms (Main Exercise: Bicep Curls)
    Day 2: Chest (ME: Bench)
    Day 3: Legs & Back (ME: Squats & Deadlifts)
    Day 4: Rest
    Repeat...

    I would throw in an hour of running/elliptical whenever I could, usually on the off days. I haven't done any "cardio" for 2 months now, but I've kept up my weight lifting somewhat. I started at a 95 lbs bench, I'm at 150 lbs now. 75 lbs squat, now at 125, and 110 deadlift, now at 130. It hasn't been terribly structured, I know, and I've been riding on my beginner's gains, though I probably won't plateau for a while unless I go hardcore.

    Now, should I just do crazy cardio? Tomorrow, I'm planning on running for an hour in the morning, and an hour in the evening. I'm gonna try that for the week. Too much? Or should I do, cardio in the morn, weights at night? Or just cardio?

    Diet-wise: I'm vegetarian. I get my protein through peanut butter, milk, soya milk, and soya meat, as well as any normal protein in my regular diet. Although, I don't eat very regularly. Like today, I ate yesterday at like 9pm, woke up today at 1pm, didn't eat until 5pm. At school, I'll try to get in a nice breakfast of fruits and/or yogourt, decent lunch, and dinner's usually not a problem, I just reheat some of my mom's curry.

    Problem is, I've heard recommendations of 5 meals a day, not 3. I semi-watch my calories, I used to count, now I just know what to eat, and how much, and it's probably the biggest reason I've lost weight, and continued to. Should I keep doing this, or am I completely retarded, and don't know what I'm doing, and should revamp?

    Edit: Crap, yeah, I'm doing this as a hobby. I realize most ppl on this forum are actually competing and what not. No disrespect intended, but some people just can't make that kind of committment. I want Muay Thai to be something that I do, not the one thing that I do.

    Also, flexibility: mine's ****. I can't even sit cross-legged on the ground without my quadriceps feeling the burn, and my ankles feeling weight on them. Help?
    Last edited by HorizonXP; 10/11/2005 2:35am at .
  8. Torakaka is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/11/2005 2:33am

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    Quote Originally Posted by AkiraMusashi
    Strength training benefits all. Resistance to injury, ease of movement, Higher immunities, enhanced recovery times, increased endurance due to the strength aspect of enduring activities, I can go on for days...

    oh I'm definitely not saying strength training would be WORTHLESS to a hobbyist, just that it's not entirely necessary for doing a muay thai class.
    Ranked #9 internationally at 118lbs by WIKBA http://www.womenkickboxing.com/wikba...rch%202009.htm
  9. Equipoise is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/11/2005 2:36am

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    Did you just say Soy? I'll deal with this tommorow..
  10. Lothene is offline
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    Posted On:
    10/11/2005 2:38am

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     Style: Muay Thai

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    Re: the flexibility - might seem over the top but I wish I had gone to see a physio BEFORE I started training for flexibility rather than after, as I managed to agitate a back problem I didn't realise I had, and ended up missing training for a while. A good physio can give you some good stretches to do and also good exercises for building strength in the muscles that support the movements you will make when you start.
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