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  1. #1
    Judah Maccabee's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Stop buying bubble tea and thai iced tea at restaurants.

    Here's some culinary words of wisdom from samurai_steve.

    Your typical thai iced tea runs about $2-$3 at a restaurant, and bubble tea can run upwards of $4, depending on the location.

    This doesn't apply to places that do high-end bubble tea, as in using real fruit in their blenders; this applies to the far more common usage of powders and syrups.

    Thai iced tea (TIT) is the perfect case study in restaurant markup, namely because I make my own superior TIT for a fraction of the cost. Let's begin.

    The tea used to make thai iced tea is of an inferior quality to most teas, costing $2 a pound, and is available in most Asian grocery stores or Thai groceries (there is one a mile away from my place). Assuming a proportion of 1tbsp per 8oz of water, you can make about 100 16oz glasses.

    The other key ingredient is condensed milk. You can purchase a 14oz can for approximately one dollar. Depending on desired richness, you can use half or all of the can for this half-gallon recipe. For simplicity, we're going to use all 14oz of condensed milk for our 64oz of tea.

    Using the ratio we discussed, you need 8tbsp of the tea brewed in boiling water for two minutes, then discard the leaves. Stir in the condensed milk. Pour over ice, voila, thai iced tea! The only hard part is finding the right kind of tea.

    There is enough tea in the 1lb bag to make close to 100 16oz glasses of tea. Using the original recipe, you would need about 30 cans of condensed milk for it all.

    So altogether, you can spend $32 to make what could cost you $200-$300 in a restaurant for the same quantity. That's a markup of 7-10 times what you'd spend at home, and the labor cost hardly justifies that.

    Bubble tea can be far worse. Just google around to see the cost of getting your own powder and tapioca balls and you'll see what I mean. It'd have to be spectacular bubble tea for me to justify the cost.

  2. #2
    FighterJones's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    never had this before, so what kind of tea is this(the stuff you buy in bulk, is it just called "thai tea"?
    it sounds good
    Last edited by FighterJones; 9/25/2005 8:55pm at .

  3. #3

    Join Date
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by samurai_steve
    Here's some culinary words of wisdom from samurai_steve.

    Your typical thai iced tea runs about $2-$3 at a restaurant, and bubble tea can run upwards of $4, depending on the location.

    This doesn't apply to places that do high-end bubble tea, as in using real fruit in their blenders; this applies to the far more common usage of powders and syrups.

    Thai iced tea (TIT) is the perfect case study in restaurant markup, namely because I make my own superior TIT for a fraction of the cost. Let's begin.

    The tea used to make thai iced tea is of an inferior quality to most teas, costing $2 a pound, and is available in most Asian grocery stores or Thai groceries (there is one a mile away from my place). Assuming a proportion of 1tbsp per 8oz of water, you can make about 100 16oz glasses.

    The other key ingredient is condensed milk. You can purchase a 14oz can for approximately one dollar. Depending on desired richness, you can use half or all of the can for this half-gallon recipe. For simplicity, we're going to use all 14oz of condensed milk for our 64oz of tea.

    Using the ratio we discussed, you need 8tbsp of the tea brewed in boiling water for two minutes, then discard the leaves. Stir in the condensed milk. Pour over ice, voila, thai iced tea! The only hard part is finding the right kind of tea.

    There is enough tea in the 1lb bag to make close to 100 16oz glasses of tea. Using the original recipe, you would need about 30 cans of condensed milk for it all.

    So altogether, you can spend $32 to make what could cost you $200-$300 in a restaurant for the same quantity. That's a markup of 7-10 times what you'd spend at home, and the labor cost hardly justifies that.

    Bubble tea can be far worse. Just google around to see the cost of getting your own powder and tapioca balls and you'll see what I mean. It'd have to be spectacular bubble tea for me to justify the cost.
    Gee, i wonder if this could be applied to some other over-priced caffeinated beverage?


    One of my best friends owns a bubble tea shop in Houston, so i am biased towards the stuff.

  4. #4
    Judah Maccabee's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Coffee requires far more skill and art to brew properly than thai iced tea. High quality regular tea deserves the same skill and attention coffee does; for example, not using boiling water to brew leaves (which extracts too much out of the leaf, creating a more harsh, bitter flavor).

    Coffee requires attention to the grind, water temp, palatibility with any other foods consumed with it, brewing time, etc. This isn't a thread about fine coffee and teas; it's about how something like TIT can be brewed at a fraction of the cost with no sacrifice of flavor.

    FJ - I went into the Thai grocery and asked for "the tea you make TIT with." I got what they gave me. Googling it says it's just called "Thai tea." It's a very good beverage served at all Thai restaurants and most Asian-themed places.

  5. #5
    Phrost's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Fortunately there's only one place out here that I know of that serves either. If there were one up the street from my house, I'd be guilty of spending several hundred dollars a month on them as they're fooking awesome.

  6. #6
    Meager's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think people should stop buying bubble tea cause it's really disgusting.

  7. #7
    JKDChick's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Man, I just spent an hour I should have been studying making homemade Chai Tea for this very reason
    Monkey Ninjas! Attack!

  8. #8

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    you know, that name "chai tea" always confuses me. because chai just translates to "tea" from russian. so when i hear chai tea, i think "tea tea".

  9. #9

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by MaverickZ
    you know, that name "chai tea" always confuses me. because chai just translates to "tea" from russian. so when i hear chai tea, i think "tea tea".
    Heh. Same in Punjabi and Hindi and I'm sure some other languages too.

  10. #10
    Phrost's Avatar
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I thought it was "Chat" in Hindi/Punjabi.

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