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  1. judoguy is offline

    Registered Member

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    108

    Posted On:
    9/23/2005 9:50am


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Flexibility is acheived throug the CNS and relaxed mujscles as well as joint mobiliy. People who are inflexible either have tight muscles, poor joint mobility or a problem with the CNS (BTW, I find it hard to explain the CNS bit, so can someone else do that for me?) When you stretch you are not lenghening your muscles, but relaxing them. When soembody complains of having short hamstrings, they really mean tight hamstrings.
  2. Jekyll is offline
    Jekyll's Avatar

    .

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    On the wrong side of the pond for gong sau
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    Posted On:
    9/23/2005 10:00am

    supporting member
     Style: San shou(tai chi) +judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Flexibility improves with stretching over time, so it's clearly about a lot more then just relaxing.
    For range of motion to improve either the muscle has to lengthen further when stretched, or the tendons. It's not the tendons, so it must be the muscle. I'm sure the muscles length inside the standard ROM is the same as before, but it doesn't sound that to misleading to call stretching lengthening.

    Edit: Well it's advertising copy, so it's fairly misleading, as opposed to just being wrong.
    Last edited by Jekyll; 9/23/2005 10:07am at .

    Quote Originally Posted by Stickx
    It must suck for legit practitioners of tai chi like Cullion to see their art get all watered down into exercise for seniors.
    Those who esteme qi have no strength. ~ Exposition of Insights into the Thirteen Postures Attrib: Wu Yuxiang founder of Wu style tai chi.
  3. Cullion is offline
    Cullion's Avatar

    Everybody was Kung Fu fighting

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    Posted On:
    9/23/2005 10:12am

    supporting member
     Style: Tai Chi

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I sort of agree with Jekyll and JudoGuy simultaneously.

    I think stretching to achieve a greater range of movement is largely a CNS effect, but I think the muscle get's 'longer' without the fibre actually growing laterally. I think stretching just trains your CNS to allow the fibres to be stretched further, without making them 'bigger' if you see what I mean.
  4. lawdog is offline

    Middleweight

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    Posted On:
    9/23/2005 11:11am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo & Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It's not a mystery. Yes, you can "stretch" muscle tissue and you can "lengthen" muscle tissue.

    The confusion arises because people confuse that concept with lengthening the whole muscle. Your muscle's insertion points will not change, therefore the length of the muscle as a whole will not change.

    But you certainly can stretch and lengthen muscle tissue thereby increasing the flexibility of that tissue.
  5. baofuhaibo is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/23/2005 10:22pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm done reading Core Performance, and here's my review:

    Absolute fucking must buy. It's not done by Men's Health, so those of you who hate Men's Health on some strange principles need not worry. It teahces you how to train like an athlete. You can't lift weights like an athlete, you can only do weirdo excercises that noone else does. Warming up and cooling down are twice as important as the workout. This book blew my mind.

    There are seven workout units to the core workout: Movement Prep(Active stretching warmup), Prehab(Injury prevention), Physioball Routine(Stability excercises, core excercises, injury prevention, and balance), Elasticity(Plyometrics the scientific way), Strength(Weight training athletically), Energy System Development(HIIT and lactate threshold training), and Regeneration(A series of excercises, foam roll massage techniques, and rope assisted stretching to help promote muscle recovery and flexibility in motion). The diet was solid and scientifically proven, with facts and such. It was just a little shady on facts though, like he didn't really know but he heard it from somewhere you know? It's a diet everyone can enjoy, but it's for athletes.

    The Core Workout itself is set up beautifully. It sounds like it will lengthen your workout a bit, but once you stop being a ***** and resting between excercises you'll zip through it in about an hour or so(It's mostly a bigass split routine spread over a week, you might do one unit 3 or 4 times a week and another unit only twice), the strength unit is set up in supersets for explosiveness and time constraints, so it's about 4-6 compound moves in supersets that can be followed as a circuit, but only if your a pro, like they don't advise it for normies like AkiraMusashi or Rigante, but it'll probably make it faster and harder.

    I'm not going to follow it word for word, because I'm going to incorperate uneven loads into my workout, but trust me, the principles will be there. Stop excercising like a bodybuilder or a powerlifter, stop excercising like a guy that just wants to lose some weight for his wife for your anniversity, and get off your ass and snatch up this fucking book before it's gone, and start excercising like the goddamn athlete you are. Start excercising not like a martial artist, like a Bullshido Martial Artist.

    I give this book 9.5 katamaris out of 10, I didn't like the shadyness in the diet, otherwise it was perfect.
    Last edited by baofuhaibo; 10/09/2005 6:54pm at .
  6. baofuhaibo is offline

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    Posted On:
    9/23/2005 10:34pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I also read The Men's Health Weight-Free Workout, and little 100 page tiny book about weight free excercise, I read it all today, in about an hour, and here's my review:

    It was solid. It contained a lot of interesting excercises to incorperate a full body routine, even if your too weak to do a chinup. If you want a more comprehensive guide, I would suggest The Men's Health Home Workout Bible, which contains more excercises, is more specific, but doesn't set up their programs or diet well, and encourages isolation excercises a little too much. The Men's Health Weight-Free Workout contains a lot of usefull information and a diet plan on par with many, many books in a condensed form everyone can understand. They didn't say NUTHIN' about cardio or HIIT though. Not a damn thing. I would at least get a jump rope with this book, and do jump roping in between sets and on off days for better results. I enjoyed my read, it was good. I give Men's Health Best Weight-Free Workout: 8 Mark Verstegens out of 12. I would recommend it to anybody with a lack of equipment, 10 bucks, and a nearby Border's.
  7. lawdog is offline

    Middleweight

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    Mar 2005
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    Florida
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    1,660

    Posted On:
    9/24/2005 8:29am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo & Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by baofuhaibo
    I'm done reading Core Performance, and here's my review:

    Absolute fucking must buy. It's not done by Men's Health, so those of you who hate Men's Health on some strange principles need not worry. It teahces you how to train like an athlete. You can't lift weights like an athlete, you can only do weirdo excercises that noone else does. Warming up and cooling down are twice as important as the workout. This book blew my mind. There are seven workout units to the core workout: Movement Prep(Active stretching warmup), Prehab(Injury prevention), Physioball Routine(Stability excercises, core excercises, injury prevention, and balance), Elasticity(Plyometrics the scientific way), Strength(Weight training athletically), Energy System Development(HIIT and lactate threshold training), and Regeneration(A series of excercises, foam roll massage techniques, and rope assisted stretching to help promote muscle recovery and flexibility in motion). The diet was solid and scientifically proven, with facts and such. It was just a little shady on facts though, like he didn't really know but he heard it from somewhere you know? It's a diet everyone can enjoy, but it's for athletes. The Core Workout itself is set up beautifully. It sounds like it will lengthen your workout a bit, but once you stop being a ***** and resting between excercises you'll zip through it in about an hour or so(It's mostly a bigass split routine spread over a week, you might do one unit 3 or 4 times a week and another unit only twice), the strength unit is set up in supersets for explosiveness and time constraints, so it's about 4-6 compound moves in supersets that can be followed as a circuit, but only if your a pro, like they don't advise it for normies like AkiraMusashi or Rigante, but it'll probably make it faster and harder. I'm not going to follow it word for word, because I'm going to incorperate uneven loads into my workout, but trust me, the principles will be there. Stop excercising like a bodybuilder or a powerlifter, stop excercising like a guy that just wants to lose some weight for his wife for your anniversity, and get off your ass and snatch up this fucking book before it's gone, and start excercising like the goddamn athlete you are. Start excercising not like a martial artist, like a Bullshido Martial Artist.

    I give this book 9.5 katamaris out of 10, I didn't like the shadyness in the diet, otherwise it was perfect.
    What's so unique about the weight training? What makes it "athletic"?
  8. Nid is offline

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Posts
    3,530

    Posted On:
    9/24/2005 8:52am

    supporting member
     Style: Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Flexibility. Between the insertion and origin there is tendon, muscle belly, and tendon.

    Tendon:-----
    Muscle belly:OOOOO

    Let's say this is a biceps:

    -------OOOOO--------

    To say a muscle "lengthens" implies muscle displaces tendon, like so: --OOOOOOO--

    That is wrong. The only way muscle grows is in cross section.

    The only part of of anatomy which appreciably stretches is the muscle...not the tendon. The more muscle one has lengthwise (in proportion to tendon) the easier he will increase his flexibility.

    Biceps: -------OOOOO-------
    Same biceps while stretched: -------O-O-O-O-O-------

    Tendons didn't move. Muscle didn't need to "lengthen". It will always return to the same state. It's an elastic tissue.

    Someone doomed with a proportionally short muscle muscle belly isn't going to have the same potential for flexibility. I.e. -------OO-------

    There's only a little potential flexibility in such a proportionally short bit of muscle belly.
    Last edited by Nid; 9/24/2005 8:56am at .
  9. baofuhaibo is offline

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    Sep 2004
    Location
    Alton, IL
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    811

    Posted On:
    9/24/2005 9:52am


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by lawdog
    What's so unique about the weight training? What makes it "athletic"?
    Excercises arranged in supersets of opposing muscle groups, high to low, and so forth. Going from a strength excercise to an explosive one, the excercises themselves require balance and coordination along with strength(much like the movements we see and do in sports), and they're compound moves that work multiple muscle groups, like the split curl-to-press, split squat, alternating dumbell bench press, cable chop, etc.
  10. baofuhaibo is offline

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    Sep 2004
    Location
    Alton, IL
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    Posted On:
    10/02/2005 7:31pm


     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I just finished reading Scrawny to Brawny. This book is THE CURE to an ectomorphic physique. Ectomorphs have certain disabilities when it comes to working out because of their long limbs and metabolism and such. If your looking for a strength training book, this book is it plus more. The 3rd or 4th phase is pure growth, so you can skip it if your all for strength. The book uses various proven tests from several chiropractic peoples and scientists to analyze your strength imbalances before you start the program, for injury prevention and correction.

    This part can be used by all. You know how the scientific cure for ectomorphs is always compound lifts? They can't do compound lifts like you and I. They have to make certain adjustments for injury prevention and growth and strength maximilizationess(I'm making up a lot of words to explain this to you), but the cure is still compound lifts. They have to make strength modifications though to correct their imbalances, or else face failure and certain death. Of results. This book is beautiful. The diet, the excercise, the science, the man-pictures(mostly clothed test subjects!), it's beautiful! I give it, in terms of usefullness for Bullshido members, martial artists, and ectomorphs alike, 7 Zodiac Braves out of 10. The information doesn't apply to all, but I suggest all read it. You'll correct your strength imbalances at least, and be pointed in the right direction with the diet and excercise sections, but only 2-3 phases will help you in strength.
    Last edited by baofuhaibo; 10/09/2005 6:53pm at .
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