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  1. #11
    kiai_killer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
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    Newcastle, UK
    Posts
    576
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I wanna ninja to play with too!!
    Straight punches make you go blind. More damage is done to a criminals nervous system when they are struck. Strikes that make you stronger. All this and more systema douchebaggery:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eak-m2iwI7Q

    NEW BONUS REEL, feat RobG at it again! lol:
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SJDnMDJVWmQ

  2. #12
    Yes Koto got his name changed, quit asking... supporting member
    VikingPower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    4,993
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyCache
    Is raven the guy that looks like blade? He is teh suck. I like the boxer guy. He has the ultimate tekken 5 queso.
    King pwns all those Tekken bitches.

  3. #13
    MEGA JESUS-SAMA's Avatar
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    Jan 2005
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    Pirate Island
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    7,038
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Tekken sucks, thereby nulling any coolness of any of its characters.

  4. #14
    King Sleepless's Avatar
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    Jul 2005
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    Cuba
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    10,058
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyCache
    Is raven the guy that looks like blade? He is teh suck. I like the boxer guy. He has the ultimate tekken 5 queso.
    No way the Kempo guy is waaaay more nacho than anyone else.

  5. #15
    Yes Koto got his name changed, quit asking... supporting member
    VikingPower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
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    4,993
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by MEGA JESUS-SAN
    Tekken sucks, thereby nulling any coolness of any of its characters.
    Be quiet before I 10-hit combo your ass.

  6. #16
    Yrkoon9's Avatar
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    Jun 2004
    Location
    Land of the Living
    Posts
    4,593
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I would say you have little to actually worry about. Even if you know very little, it my opinion that they are more theory than application, and an injury you might sustain will be more accidental than anything else.

  7. #17
    Gypsy Jazz's Avatar
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    Jul 2004
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    Long Island, NY
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    961
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Sirc
    No way the Kempo guy is waaaay more nacho than anyone else.
    Although a simple and understandable typo, I find it hilarious. I figured I could find an image of a kempo nacho or have fun trying.

    I found this: http://nachos.sabatos.net/index2.html Sometimes I hate the internet.

    Also, I know nothing of ninjitsu except what I've seen of it on websites and tv. There seems to be a strong emphasis on standing locks. Can't offer up much more than that. Hope it goes down though, I'd be interested to hear what happens.

  8. #18
    Lane's Avatar
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    Feb 2005
    Location
    Houston, Texas
    Posts
    1,354
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Bujinkan people, except for those who crosstrain, will generally WAIT for you to start the fight. They'll hang back waiting to react to you. So dictate the terms. Come out with a lot of combos. Most Bujinkan waza, especially at the low levels, are taught in the kata form where there are at most 2-3 attacks from uke that tori defends against and finishes with a technique. Most of the punches that are used are straight, stepping punches (what some call "lunge punches"). Generally, the first move someone will do in this situation is to fade back and away from your lead hand in a punch. If this is a left jab, follow with a distance-closing round kick (since I see you're a fellow MT enthusiast, I'll tell you how I'd fight someone from my old dojo). Bujinkan kick defense, if it's practiced at all, is very much like it's punching defense -- you use kerikudaki (destroying a kick) to block a kick. It's basically an oblique kick where they attempt to plant their toes in the soft part of your thigh while turning their hips to generate power. It has the distinct disadvantage that it won't actually stop your shin from coming into contact with them. If you can take a kick to the inside of your thigh to get off a round kick to the ribs, take it. Low kicks will probably work better. Work their knees over until they drop their guard and step in and box them till they give up. They may try to check your low kicks, but I can guarantee which of you will have better shin conditioning.

    A good Bujinkan fighter will be aggressive in how they fight, maybe using a position called jumonji no kamae. They'll cross their hands in an "X" in front of their body and raise the X in front of their face. It's not a half-bad idea, actually. It's hard to punch through the X, and most people will punch AT your hands if you box from this range. They'll try to rap you on the back of your knuckles. The good thing is that you can get them into the habit of doing this and kick the **** out of them. You should be able to kick through their guard in this position too.

    If they attempt to attack you, the attack will be in one of those stepping punches to a limited amount of target areas -- the arms, the hands, the neck, the collarbone, the floating ribs, and the chest will be the most popular targets. If they kick, it will most likely be low, stomping kicks kind of like teeps. I recommend just scooping them out of the way and following with a low kick to the back of their knees.

    They'll be much better fighters from the clinch, so stay at striking range and wear them down if you can. From the clinch, the Bujinkan has a lot of hip and shoulder throws that are fairly effective, as well as some standing joint locks and takedowns. If you do clinch, keep their head in close to you and use things like skip knees to pound them. Watch out -- people in the Bujinkan will throw elbows.

    Like I said, this is all if your potential sparring partner doesn't crosstrain, and this is assuming that they've been taught taijutsu like I was.
    --
    L.

  9. #19
    Virus's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2005
    Location
    Australia
    Posts
    6,966
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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Come at him with aggression, use speed and power. Most aren't used to it.

  10. #20

    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    San Francisco, CA
    Posts
    191
    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Arahoushi
    Bujinkan people, except for those who crosstrain, will generally WAIT for you to start the fight. They'll hang back waiting to react to you. So dictate the terms. Come out with a lot of combos. Most Bujinkan waza, especially at the low levels, are taught in the kata form where there are at most 2-3 attacks from uke that tori defends against and finishes with a technique. Most of the punches that are used are straight, stepping punches (what some call "lunge punches"). Generally, the first move someone will do in this situation is to fade back and away from your lead hand in a punch. If this is a left jab, follow with a distance-closing round kick (since I see you're a fellow MT enthusiast, I'll tell you how I'd fight someone from my old dojo). Bujinkan kick defense, if it's practiced at all, is very much like it's punching defense -- you use kerikudaki (destroying a kick) to block a kick. It's basically an oblique kick where they attempt to plant their toes in the soft part of your thigh while turning their hips to generate power. It has the distinct disadvantage that it won't actually stop your shin from coming into contact with them. If you can take a kick to the inside of your thigh to get off a round kick to the ribs, take it. Low kicks will probably work better. Work their knees over until they drop their guard and step in and box them till they give up. They may try to check your low kicks, but I can guarantee which of you will have better shin conditioning.

    A good Bujinkan fighter will be aggressive in how they fight, maybe using a position called jumonji no kamae. They'll cross their hands in an "X" in front of their body and raise the X in front of their face. It's not a half-bad idea, actually. It's hard to punch through the X, and most people will punch AT your hands if you box from this range. They'll try to rap you on the back of your knuckles. The good thing is that you can get them into the habit of doing this and kick the **** out of them. You should be able to kick through their guard in this position too.

    If they attempt to attack you, the attack will be in one of those stepping punches to a limited amount of target areas -- the arms, the hands, the neck, the collarbone, the floating ribs, and the chest will be the most popular targets. If they kick, it will most likely be low, stomping kicks kind of like teeps. I recommend just scooping them out of the way and following with a low kick to the back of their knees.

    They'll be much better fighters from the clinch, so stay at striking range and wear them down if you can. From the clinch, the Bujinkan has a lot of hip and shoulder throws that are fairly effective, as well as some standing joint locks and takedowns. If you do clinch, keep their head in close to you and use things like skip knees to pound them. Watch out -- people in the Bujinkan will throw elbows.

    Like I said, this is all if your potential sparring partner doesn't crosstrain, and this is assuming that they've been taught taijutsu like I was.
    I think you're probably giving the Bujinkan guy a little too much credit, but who knows. In his ideal world, yeah, that's probably how he'd fight, but once the adrenaline starts pumping and he gets hit a few times I'm willing to bet that his fighting style will devolve into arm flailing and/or bleeding all over you.

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