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  1. twilight_ronin is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/07/2005 10:21pm


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    blocking a strike with closed eyes???

    attended an aikido class where this teacher talked about 'ki' and 'connectivity'. grabbed my shoulder and told me to close my eyes while he wanted to strike my head. said that because one of his hands was holding my gi, i should be able to sense his 'ki' and block. i didn't believe in the BS about 'ki', but rather relied on sensitivity and the sound of motion from his gi. was successful a few times and not successful a few times to a silly overhead chop to the forehead that most aikido folks wanna practice with. and when i did a good block, he kept telling me that i was too tense, which i knew was not true at all. it was just a quick circular shuto block that was leading his hand away, but it seems that he didn't like me to block him at all. another time, i moved to the side to lead away his strike and he didn't like that either. kept talking about not moving the 'right way'. worse thing is that he never even let me try it on him! wonder why....

    frankly he set the rules all for himself to hit me, and never even bothered to show how HE could do it.
  2. roly is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/07/2005 10:41pm


     Style: judo, karate, jap jj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    is this a rant or a question or bitch session?
  3. Poop Loops is offline
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    OOOOOOOOOOAAARRGGHH RLY?

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    Posted On:
    7/07/2005 10:58pm

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     Style: In Transition

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Umm... I guess that's a good way to develop your other senses... BUT, when would you use it?

    You were actively trying to sense him, yes? On the street, do you walk around trying to sense people? I don't think so. So I wouldn't waste my time on it. Besides, once you're in a fight, closing your eyes is suicide.

    Unless you're a good grappler. I've seen people close their eyes and I even do it sometimes, but then again, there's no chance of me getting punched in my face when I do it.

    PL
  4. Lane is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/07/2005 11:19pm


     Style: Muso Shinden Ryu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Poop-Loops
    Umm... I guess that's a good way to develop your other senses... BUT, when would you use it?

    You were actively trying to sense him, yes? On the street, do you walk around trying to sense people? I don't think so. So I wouldn't waste my time on it. Besides, once you're in a fight, closing your eyes is suicide.

    Unless you're a good grappler. I've seen people close their eyes and I even do it sometimes, but then again, there's no chance of me getting punched in my face when I do it.

    PL
    The drill and the guy's talk about ki was BS, but learning how to fight by feel is very important. When you're clinched up with someone or grappling you need to develop your awareness of where their body is and how it's moving so you can counter your attacks.

    I just spent an hour drilling a white belt on that very principle. I was throwing punches and having him get in close, and then making him react to my punches and kicks from there. It took him a while (and he's probably bruised to all hell) but eventually he got to where he could react decently to changes in my posture and balance.

    It has nothing to do with ki or sensing with your eyes closed, but everything about paying attention to how your training partner/opponent is moving, incase one does have to fight blind, in low light, or with people you can't otherwise see (such as behind you).

    But yes, closing your eyes is stupid if you can keep them open. But realistically, one can't always rely on having full vision available in all situations. Then again, since you're a grappler, I'm pretty sure you've learned the trick of fighting by feel already, probably much in the same way I taught this poor white belt tonight.
  5. Poop Loops is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/07/2005 11:27pm

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     Style: In Transition

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I know, I said I do that in grappling too. But this guy was training to feel punches coming out of nowhere, not from a clinch or anything*. He was punching the guy while standing up, holding only his lapel. That's WAY different from a clinch.

    *How do I know they weren't talking about clinching? This is Aikido. They don't know what a clinch is.

    I'm not as good fighting by feel as most other people in my class, but I use it usually when I am mounted or in someone's side control (happens a LOT :( ) When you try to get your legs around a guy when you can't see them, you have to rely on feel.

    PL
  6. twilight_ronin is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/07/2005 11:33pm


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Arahoushi
    The drill and the guy's talk about ki was BS, but learning how to fight by feel is very important. When you're clinched up with someone or grappling you need to develop your awareness of where their body is and how it's moving so you can counter your attacks.

    I just spent an hour drilling a white belt on that very principle. I was throwing punches and having him get in close, and then making him react to my punches and kicks from there. It took him a while (and he's probably bruised to all hell) but eventually he got to where he could react decently to changes in my posture and balance.

    It has nothing to do with ki or sensing with your eyes closed, but everything about paying attention to how your training partner/opponent is moving, incase one does have to fight blind, in low light, or with people you can't otherwise see (such as behind you).

    But yes, closing your eyes is stupid if you can keep them open. But realistically, one can't always rely on having full vision available in all situations. Then again, since you're a grappler, I'm pretty sure you've learned the trick of fighting by feel already, probably much in the same way I taught this poor white belt tonight.
    thanks for the thoughtful replies. at the same time i find it quite amazing how we can still find such teachers with so much BS and yet find so many people willing to pay money for it . the point about paying attention to movement is certainly well-taken, although i think it applies not just to grappling but to all kinds of martial arts, where an overall sensitivity to body movement is vital.
  7. Poop Loops is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/07/2005 11:35pm

    supporting member
     Style: In Transition

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think it's more amazing that I pay $100/month to get the **** beaten out of me. Many others do, too.

    PL
  8. ScotchTape is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/07/2005 11:37pm


     Style: None

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Everytime we refer to any sort of fighting/drilling with our eyes closed and "feeling" our surroundings, we shall call it a "Dux".


    I.e.,

    "Holy cow Bob, I was sparring today and I flinched, but I blocked a right straight. I sure pulled off a Dux."
  9. twilight_ronin is offline

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    Posted On:
    7/07/2005 11:39pm


     Style: Karate

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Poop-Loops
    I think it's more amazing that I pay $100/month to get the **** beaten out of me. Many others do, too.

    PL
    haha. good one. but somehow i think your 100 bucks was well spent. provided you can still walk home and get to work the next day.
  10. Lane is offline
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    Posted On:
    7/07/2005 11:40pm


     Style: Muso Shinden Ryu

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by Poop-Loops
    I know, I said I do that in grappling too. But this guy was training to feel punches coming out of nowhere, not from a clinch or anything*. He was punching the guy while standing up, holding only his lapel. That's WAY different from a clinch.
    Yeah. I didn't emphasize enough that the drill was crap. I mean, if someone chopped at my head, I think I'd fall over from laughing, or start making Austin Powers' quotes.

    *How do I know they weren't talking about clinching? This is Aikido. They don't know what a clinch is.
    No argument here.

    I'm not as good fighting by feel as most other people in my class, but I use it usually when I am mounted or in someone's side control (happens a LOT :( ) When you try to get your legs around a guy when you can't see them, you have to rely on feel.
    I dunno about this "getting a guy between my legs." :) Nah, I totally understand. My vale tudo class's groundwork consists of shooto and BJJ. Thanks to my taijutsu, I can feel whenever one of the senior students is about to break my guard. I'm still not to the point where I can do much about it, but at least I know it's coming.
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