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View Poll Results: Wristlocks ~Please read post before voting

Voters
50. You may not vote on this poll
  • 1)wristlock bad can train with them

    15 30.00%
  • 2)wristlock bad can't train with them

    1 2.00%
  • 3)wristlock good can train with them

    27 54.00%
  • 4)wristlock good can't train with them

    2 4.00%
  • I like sitting on the fence because it makes my buttocks feel funny.

    5 10.00%
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  1. Jekyll is offline
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    Posted On:
    6/26/2005 12:47pm

    supporting member
     Style: San shou(tai chi) +judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Wristlocks again

    Right, I'm sick of this everyone who doesn't like wristlocks doesn't use them bullshit.

    To me it sounds like the majority of people who are pro-wristlock do not have the oppetunity to use them in sparring or wrestling.

    Prove me wrong.

    Here are the poll options in full;
    1)I think standing wristlocks are easily resisted and I often train in a wrestling/sparring context where they are allowed.
    2)I think standing wristlocks are easily resisted and I don't often train in a wrestling/sparring context where they are allowed.
    3)I don't think standing wristlocks are easily resisted and I often train in a wrestling/sparring context where they are allowed.
    4)I don't think standing wristlocks are easily resisted and I don't often train in a wrestling/sparring context where they are allowed.

    And no, standard aikido randori is not wrestling or sparring.
    Last edited by Jekyll; 6/26/2005 12:50pm at .

    Quote Originally Posted by Stickx
    It must suck for legit practitioners of tai chi like Cullion to see their art get all watered down into exercise for seniors.
    Those who esteme qi have no strength. ~ Exposition of Insights into the Thirteen Postures Attrib: Wu Yuxiang founder of Wu style tai chi.
  2. Bang! is offline
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    Light Heavyweight

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2005 1:11pm

    supporting memberBullshido Newbie
     Style: Wu Style TCC + BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Your poll confuses me, but I'll tell you what I think:

    I have a chance to attempt wristlocks when standing and believe that their uses are very limited. However, that doesn't differentiate them from the majority of stand-up locking techniques. When on your feet, the dynamics of movement make it relatively simple to extricate yourself from locks in general. Wristlocks are particularly troublesome, IMO, because if you're in tight to your opponent, then the wrists are a pain in the ass to seize; and if you're in striking range, then wrists are still a pain in the ass to seize. However . . . Do I think that wristlocks have value anyway? Yes.

    It would be one thing if wristlocks didn't hurt or couldn't do damage. That's not the issue. If they can be used to instigate a certain predictable response or to modify your opponent's grip, then they are definitely worth exploring.

    I have had poor results when it comes to doing the former, but chalk that up to a general lack of savvy on my own part. However, I have threatened with locks lots of times in order to nullify an opponent's grip or to make them give up on a technique halfway.

    I wish that I could train with Wolverine. I believe that there is a good chance that standing locks could work as breaks if they were slammed on, but that one would need to practice consistently in order to achieve any level of real proficiency in that regard. And unless your partners have the X Factor, you're going to go through them very quickly. One of the most valuable things that I've taken from this site and applied to my own training approach is good ole Kano's take on practice and application.

    Finally, I didn't vote because I didn't like the options. My vote would actually be:
    Wristlocks not all that bad. Can train with them.
  3. Cato is offline

    Lightweight

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2005 1:16pm

    supporting member
     Style: Shorinjikempo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I think wristlocks are alright, but they are hard to learn and it takes a lot of training to make them work on a resisting person.
  4. Thaiboxerken is offline
    Thaiboxerken's Avatar

    Genius

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2005 2:18pm

    supporting member
     Style: Kru-MuayThai,GJJ-Blue

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Voted for option 1.
    "Those who can make you believe absurdities, can make you commit atrocities." Voltaire.
  5. eyebeams is offline

    Senior Member

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2005 4:17pm


     Style: Kickboxing/Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I toss kotegaeshi on folks all the time, but I usually end up just whacking the person with the other hand, since they'll muscle out of it unless I go fast -- not something I'm prepared to do with a training partner all the time. As a little unbalancing move it works well enough. I don't find other wristlocks quite as easy to apply on the fly.

    I have, on the other hand, made it work for me right to the point of dropping someone when a guy grabbed me and wanted to punch me outside of the pub. If I had done a technique from the ground, his buddy might have kicked me in the head, so I'm glad I used it.

    So I guess I'm a 4. I don't think they're easy to use, but I've made 'em work for me fine.
  6. ScotchTape is offline

    Registered Member

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2005 9:23pm


     Style: None

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    What type of fence are we talking about?
  7. J-Lau is offline
    J-Lau's Avatar

    UFC Fighter

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2005 9:46pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: MMA, No-Gi Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    "Standing wrist locks work best when following a few knees to the head"

    Seriously though... its like any submission. If you control their body, attacking someones wrist is like any other submission hold. They work on the ground if set up properly. Marcelo Garcia tapped Popovitch this year at Abu Dhabi with a wrist lock, and lots of other people were using wrist locks as well. That being said, standing wrist locks suck because you cant isolate their arm/hand properly, so they flail and get out and away.
  8. roly is offline

    Registered Member

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2005 10:17pm


     Style: judo, karate, jap jj

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    do wristlocks fall into seperate categories of "pain locks" and "break locks" or are they generally considered to be one and the same?
  9. J-Lau is offline
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    UFC Fighter

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    Posted On:
    6/26/2005 10:21pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: MMA, No-Gi Grappling

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    It does damage... does it really matter?
  10. hapkido_keith is offline
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    Crappler Extraordinaire

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    Posted On:
    6/27/2005 3:51am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I had a BJJ instructor who used to get us in wrist locks all the time. Some of my friends who train in Hapkido with me work as corrections officers and they say that wrist locks work wonderfully. I picked 3
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