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  1. PoleFighter is offline

    Professional Swede

    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Stockholm, Sweden
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    1,155

    Posted On:
    6/30/2005 7:10am


     Style: Sandbagged BJJ white belt

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!

    Strong side/weak side training focus

    Everyone seems to have a favorite side for each technique. For example, I prefer to rotate counter clockwise when I do armbars, I like having the right leg of my opponent in my half-guard and I always go for the triangle with my right leg bent. My question is, how much do you think one should fokus on developing one's weak side?

    Of course, escapes should be practiced on both sides, since you have little control over which side you end up on, but what about submissions, sweeps and takedowns? I'd love to hear what our more experienced members have to say on this subject..
    I pointed at him [the panhandler], bringing my rear hand up in a subtle approximation of the double Wu Sau guard that is the default hand position in Wing Chun Kung Fu.

    "Step away," I hissed.
    -Phil Elmore
  2. Ronin is offline

    Senior Member

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    Sep 2003
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    Canada
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    20,894

    Posted On:
    6/30/2005 7:17am

    Join us... or die
     Style: Shi Ja Quan

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    All sexual innuends aside, I go both ways and train accordingly.
    South paw and orthodox, always have, used to drive my boxing coach crazy, they hate that.
  3. Otaku Waffle is offline
    Otaku Waffle's Avatar

    Registered Member

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    Jul 2004
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    Mechelen-Belgium
    Posts
    925

    Posted On:
    6/30/2005 8:10am


     Style: Kali/Jun Fan/CSW

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I'm a leftie and will usually fight focussing on my strong side but for training I go along with the majority and learn the "right" way of doing techs first.
    I find it's a lot easier to learn [whatever] with my weak side (forcing me to pay attention to the details) and then picking it up with my strong side, rather then the other way around.
  4. lawdog is offline

    Middleweight

    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Florida
    Posts
    1,660

    Posted On:
    6/30/2005 8:14am

    supporting member
     Style: Judo & Boxing

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by PoleFighter
    Everyone seems to have a favorite side for each technique. For example, I prefer to rotate counter clockwise when I do armbars, I like having the right leg of my opponent in my half-guard and I always go for the triangle with my right leg bent. My question is, how much do you think one should fokus on developing one's weak side?

    Of course, escapes should be practiced on both sides, since you have little control over which side you end up on, but what about submissions, sweeps and takedowns? I'd love to hear what our more experienced members have to say on this subject..
    I think it probably depends on your goals. I can't really comment on BJJ, but as for judo, if you just want to learn self defense or good street fighting skills, perhaps it's not as important. But, if you want to succesfully compete at the upper levels, you need to work both sides, particularly as far as throws/takedowns. A judoka who is effective from his weak side can be as difficult to contend with as a boxer who fights southpaw.
  5. _Mick_ is offline

    Registered Member

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    Mar 2005
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    618

    Posted On:
    6/30/2005 4:05pm


     Style: Hapkido

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    http://bjj.org/articles/harris-physical.html

    this is discussed under coordination here.

    i think practicing both sides can be important. on the ground, somebody could leave their left or their right arm out, so you should be able to attack on either side.
    the same can be said for throwing, kicking, punching ect.
  6. Bang! is offline
    Bang!'s Avatar

    Light Heavyweight

    Join Date
    Apr 2003
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    3,242

    Posted On:
    6/30/2005 4:19pm

    supporting memberBullshido Newbie
     Style: Wu Style TCC + BJJ

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    I usually feel like I need a certain level of comfort with a certain technique one side before I want to start farting around with it on the other. However, I try to vary up the side that I use to practice new techniques on. That way, even though I may not be able to use a certain throw on my left side with enough proficiency, I should have a couple of other options at my disposal.

    Usually, I just concentrate on the mechanics of things, and they just seem to sort themselves out over time.
  7. awakenedstream is offline

    Featherweight

    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Concord, Ca
    Posts
    79

    Posted On:
    5/09/2011 3:33pm

    Bullshido Newbie
     Style: WT, Escrima, BJJ, MT

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    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    what about during competition time. does training both sides breed any kind of uncertainty to a technique causing more decision time and becoming slower in execution?
  8. Res Judicata is offline

    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,633

    Posted On:
    5/09/2011 3:48pm


     Style: Judo & BJJ

    --
    Hell yeah! Hell no!
    Quote Originally Posted by lawdog View Post
    I think it probably depends on your goals. I can't really comment on BJJ, but as for judo, if you just want to learn self defense or good street fighting skills, perhaps it's not as important. But, if you want to succesfully compete at the upper levels, you need to work both sides, particularly as far as throws/takedowns. A judoka who is effective from his weak side can be as difficult to contend with as a boxer who fights southpaw.
    You need to work offside throws, but unless you're Angelo Parisi, you're almost certainly going to fight righty or lefty. It's a matter of motor skill learning. Ground work is different.

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